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Center for Professional Studies

UW-PARKSIDE 2017-19 CATALOG

Greenquist 214 • 262-595-2162

College: Social Sciences and Professional Studies

Programs Offered:
Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (AROTC)
Parkside Access to College Credits Program (PACC)

Website: https://www.uwp.edu/learn/departments/professionalstudies/

Center Overview

UW-Parkside is committed to high-quality educational programs, creative and scholarly activities, and services responsive to its diverse student population, across its local, national and global communities. The Center for Professional Studies (CPS) supports the university mission by offering interdisciplinary, innovative, and diverse learning opportunities in flexible environments to students and our regional partners.  The values of CPS are compatible with the values of the University. Access: We provide motivated learners access to a high-quality, world-class education, which allows them to achieve their education and career goals. Academic Excellence: Our career-focused educational programs provide the highest level of academic excellence to prepare our students with real-world experience. Our commitment to quality is present in all aspects of program design and assessment. Innovation: Innovation is driven by an understanding that higher educational delivery must be managed in a fiscally sustainable model. Student Success: We serve as catalysts to transform the academic experience to meet the needs of students. We deliver an academic experience that is highly relevant and enriching to our students’ lives. Diversity and Inclusiveness: Our curriculum is developed to align with the needs of the global economy’s leading industries. The diversity of our students reflects the global economy in which they will practice.

Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (AROTC)
Program Overview

UW-Parkside students have the opportunity to participate in the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (AROTC) through Marquette University. AROTC is a leadership development program consisting of three interconnected components: 1) on-campus, 2) off-campus and 3) the Leadership Development Program (LDP). By design, the three components dovetail for seamless, progressive and sequential leader development and prepare men and women to receive commissions as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army, Army National Guard, or the U.S. Army Reserve.

On-Campus Component: The on-campus component is the Military Science and Leadership (MILS) Curriculum. The curriculum consists of classroom learning, applied leadership labs, leader development exercises, AROTC Battalion command and staff roles and the Army Physical Fitness Training program. Far more comprehensive than traditional curricula, each Cadet receives digital textbooks, interacts with the instructor during lessons and engages with multi-media technology.

Off-Campus Component: The off-campus component consists of a summer course designed to assess and develop Cadet leadership potential. The Advanced Camp is a capstone training event that usually occurs at the end of the Cadet’s third year. This 29-day training event incorporates a wide range of subjects designed to develop and evaluate leadership ability. The event places each Cadet in a variety of leadership positions, many of which simulate stressful tactical situations. In addition to proving their leadership abilities and military skills, Cadets must meet established standards in physical fitness, navigation, weapons training, communication, first aid, water confidence and patrolling techniques. At this point, this paid event is the only summer training event that a Cadet is required to participate in.

The other summer training event is the Basic Camp. Every year about 10 first and second year Cadets that have signed a contract with the U.S. Army will attend this 29-day course. The intent is to hone their foundational skills and prepare them for entry into the AROTC progression Advanced Course (junior-senior years).

Additionally, each Cadet participates in two Field Training Exercises off campus, one each term, usually in September and April, from Friday to Sunday. These exercises implement practical lessons learned throughout the year from the course, laboratory and physical training curricula.

Leadership Development Program: The Leadership Development Program (LDP) is the cornerstone of AROTC training and leadership development. The LDP is an individual-focused assessment process that standardizes leader performance measures. It organizes the extremely complex components of leadership into a useful learning model — standards of performance and a methodology to achieve them. The model accommodates all levels of proficiency and assures personalized development throughout a Cadet’s AROTC experience, from program entry to commissioning. Within the LDP, experienced and qualified observers (Military Science and Leadership Instructors) maximize individual potential by administering structured, progressively complex leadership experiences and Cadet leadership skills are refined through self-assessment, peer assessment and instructor feedback.

We understand that today’s students need flexibility, so we offer a variety of options in completing this leadership development program. The two primary options (but not limited to) are: the four-year program and the two-year program.

Four-year Program: The four-year program is divided into two phases: the Basic Course and the Advanced Course. 1) The Basic Course is taken during a student’s freshman and sophomore years. These courses are open to all students on an elective basis and upon successful completion students receive University credit. Students incur no military obligation for completing basic course requirements and these courses are free to all registered undergraduate and graduate Marquette University students. 2) The Advanced Course is taken during a student’s junior and senior year. Students in this program must have completed the Basic Course, have two years remaining in college and enter into a contract with the U.S. Army. Advanced Course students take classes in leadership and participate in leadership laboratories to prepare for the 29-day Advanced Camp during the summer between junior and senior years. Students receive monetary compensation for attending this training.

Two-year Program: The two-year program is designed for students at four-year institutions who did not take AROTC during their first two years of college, students entering a two-year graduate course of study, or students who have previous military experience. Students begin formal training by attending the 29-day paid Basic Camp. Successful completion of this training is a pre-requisite for enrolling in the AROTC Advanced Course.

Scholarships: The Army offers a number of scholarship opportunities to students enrolled in the Senior ROTC Program. High School seniors can apply for four-year, three-year advance designee and four-year nursing scholarships. These scholarships are applied for through the Army ROTC website and are awarded based upon merit, not financial need, by the U.S. Army Cadet Command. These scholarships pay full-tuition and fees annually with a $1,200 textbook allowance. Scholarship students also receive $300-$500 a month stipend during each term their scholarship is in effect.

Prospective students interested in a four-year Reserve Officers’ Training Corps Scholarship should start the application process during their junior and senior year of high school. Four-year scholarship applications are only available at the Army ROTC website or by calling Cadet Command at (800) USA-ROTC for a paper application. Current college students may apply for four-, three- and two-year on-campus scholarships through participation in AROTC and the Marquette Department of Military Science.

On-Campus scholarship applications are submitted to the Marquette University (the Host Program) Department of Military Science. On-campus applications may be submitted at any time during the school year. Students that apply are subject to a board of review by a panel of AROTC Cadre and university administration for selection.

In order to be eligible for a scholarship, students must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen.
  • Be under 31 years of age at the time of commissioning.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.500 on a 4.0 scale.
  • Have a minimum score of 920 on the SAT or 19 on the ACT.
  • Satisfactorily explain any record of minor civil infractions.
  • Pass a Department of Defense Medical Evaluation.
  • Have no moral obligation or personal convictions that prevents a student from bearing arms and supporting and defending the Constitution of the United States.

Nursing Scholarships: UW-Parkside is one of 41 AROTC programs to be designated as one of the U.S. Army’s Nursing Centers of Excellence. The U.S. Army Cadet Command is able to offer four-year and three-year nursing scholarships annually to qualified applicants to the College of Nursing. The application process and scholarship benefits are the same as those for other AROTC scholarships. The applicant should start the application process between the junior and senior years of high school. Nursing students already enrolled in the College of Nursing may also apply for two and three year on-campus scholarships through the AROTC department.

Non-scholarship Program: All students enrolled in the Advanced Course receive a monthly stipend of $450 (juniors) or $500 (seniors) to cover expenses during the school year. Successful completion of the Advanced Course leads to commissioning in the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve or National Guard. Veterans: Men and women with prior military service may enroll directly into the advanced course with the permission of the Professor of Military Science and proper academic alignment. Veterans must be able to meet the age, citizenship and physical standards of the AROTC program.

Graduate Educational Delay: Students may request that their active duty service be deferred to attend graduate school, law school, medical school or physical therapy school.

Cross-enrollment: Students must enroll in Military Science courses and participate in the AROTC program at Marquette University while continuing their major curricula at UW-Parkside.

Requirements for the AROTC Program (27 credits)

Required Courses:

  1. Freshman Year, Semester 1 (2 credits)
    1. MILS 101 Military Physical Training I 1 cr
    2. MILS 110 Military Leadership I 1 cr
  2. Freshman Year, Semester 2 (2 credits)
    1. MILS 102 Military Physical Training II 1 cr
    2. MILS 120 Military Leadership II 1 cr
  3. Sophomore Year, Semester 1 (3 credits)
    1. MILS 201 Military Physical Training III 1 cr
    2. MILS 210 Tactical Leadership 2 cr
  4. Sophomore Year, Semester 2 (3 credits)
    1. MILS 202 Military Physical Training IV 1 cr
    2. MILS 220 Military Leadership in the Contemporary Environment 2 cr
  5. Junior Year, Semester 1 (4 credits)
    1. MILS 301 Military Physical Training V 1 cr
    2. MILS 310 Adaptive Team Leadership 3 cr
  6. Junior Year, Semester 2 (4 credits)
    1. MILS 302 Military Physical Training VI 1 cr
    2. MILS 320 Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making 3 cr
  7. Senior Year, Semester 1 (3 credits)
    1. MILS 401 Military Physical Training VII 1 cr
    2. MILS 410 Applied Leadership I 2 cr
  8. Senior Year, Semester 2 (3 credits)
    1. MILS 402 Military Physical Training VIII 1 cr
    2. MILS 420 Applied Leadership II 2 cr
  9. Military History Requirement (3 credits)
    (course taken any semester available)
    Choose one:
    1. HIST 102 U.S. Reconstruction to Recent Times 3 cr
    2. HIST 342 The American Civil War 3 cr

For more information about enrolling in the Army ROTC program, contact:

 

Courses in AROTC (MILS)

101 Military Physical Training I 1 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Provides goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill.  Focuses on strength, mobility and endurance development, measured by the Army Physical Fitness Test.

     
102 Military Physical Training II 1 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 101 or consent of instructor. Freq: Spring.
Provides goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill.  Focuses on strength, mobility and endurance development, measured by the Army Physical Fitness Test.

     
110 Military Leadership I 1 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Introduces military professional and military leadership including the core competencies critical to effective leadership such as time management, problem solving, and decision making.  Establishes a framework for understanding officership, leadership, and ROTC values.

     
120 Military Leadership II 1 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 110. Freq: Spring.
Extends the depth of military leadership and competency introducing communication principles, military briefings, effective writing, problem solving, goal setting, listening and speaking skills, and counseling.

     
201 Military Physical Training III 1 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 102. Freq: Fall.
Provides goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill.  Focuses on strength, mobility and endurance development, measured by the Army Physical Fitness Test.

     
202 Military Physical Training IV 1 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 201. Freq: Spring.
Provides goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill.  Focuses on strength, mobility and endurance development, measured by the Army Physical Fitness Test.

     
210 Tactical Leadership 2 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 120. Freq: Fall.
Explores dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and historical leadership theories that form the basis of Army leadership framework.

     
220 Military Leadership in the Contemporary Environment 2 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 210. Freq: Spring.
Examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex operational environment. Develops leadership style and communication and team-building skills in the contemporary environment.

     
301 Military Physical Training V 1 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 202. Freq: Fall.
Provides goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill.  Focuses on strength, mobility and endurance development, measured by the Army Physical Fitness Test.

     
302 Military Physical Training VI 1 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 301. Freq: Spring.
Provides goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill.  Focuses on strength, mobility and endurance development, measured by the Army Physical Fitness Test.

     
310 Adaptive Team Leadership 3 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 220. Freq: Fall.
Covers the study, practice and application of Army leadership in team or squad situations. Introduces to the Leader Development Program and how to plan and conduct individual and small unit training.

     
320 Leadership and Ethical-Decision Making 3 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 310. Freq: Spring.
Provides development as a leader through applied training in interpersonal communication, values, and ethical decision-making.

     
401 Military Physical Training VII 1 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 302. Freq: Fall.
Provides goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill.  Focuses on strength, mobility and endurance development, measured by the Army Physical Fitness Test.

     
402 Military Physical Training VIII 1 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 401. Freq: Spring.
Provides goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill.  Focuses on strength, mobility and endurance development, measured by the Army Physical Fitness Test.

     
410  Applied Leadership I 2 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 320. Freq: Fall.
Focuses on the Military Decision Making Process, the Army’s Training Management System, and ethical leadership and decision- making.  Includes training, counseling and evaluating within “army context” and ethics.

     
420 Applied Leadership II 2 cr
 

Prereq: MILS 410. Freq: Spring.
Examines legal aspects of decision-making and leadership, operations from the tactical to strategic level, administrative and logistical management as students/cadets transition to Army lieutenant.

 
     

Parkside Access to College Credits (PACC)
Program Overview

The Parkside Access to College Credit Program (PACC) allows eligible high school students to earn college and high school credit simultaneously by taking and successfully completing designated courses at their high school, known as concurrent enrollment. By taking college credit in high school, students also set themselves apart by demonstrating that they can succeed in college-level classes. Go to https://www.uwp.edu/learn/departments/professionalstudies/pacc/ to learn more about the PACC program or contact the director, Denise Hancock at (262) 595-2162 or hancock@uwp.edu.

900 Wood Road · P.O. Box 2000 · Kenosha, WI 53141-2000 P 262-595-2345

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