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English

UW-PARKSIDE 2017-19 CATALOG

RITA/CART 235 • 262-595-2139

College:
Arts and Humanities

Degree and Programs Offered:
Bachelor of Arts
Major - English
Minors – English, English Language Arts for Elementary Education, English Language Arts for Secondary Education
Certificates - Creative Writing, Film Studies, Professional Writing and Communication

Student Organizations/Clubs:
A chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, a national English honor society.
Straylight Literary Magazine  www.straylightmag.com

Career Possibilities:
Typical career opportunities for English majors include editors, reporters, teachers, business persons, lawyers, and writers – fiction and poetry, technical and business, and advertising.

Department Overview

The English major is designed to suit the needs of UW-Parkside’s heterogeneous population of traditional and nontraditional-aged students and their varied career paths and goals. Often combined with other majors and minors, it can become a valuable tool for students to achieve a traditional liberal education, helping them acquire a broad view of human experience, a critical approach to cultural traditions, and more complete self-understanding.

Offering a solid grounding in literature and communication skills, the English major not only prepares students for further graduate or professional study or literary careers, but also offers the opportunity to explore the traditions of British and American literature in depth. Certificates in creative writing and in professional writing and communication are available for those who envision careers as professional writers, as well as for those interested in bringing their love of language and writing to rewarding careers in business, industry, or public service. The language arts concentration within the English Major focuses on the needs of education professionals and fulfills Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction requirements for teacher training; it is also appropriate for students generally interested in linguistics and language study. We also offer a general English minor, and two language arts minors, one for students pursuing an elementary-level teaching certificate, and the other for students seeking secondary certification in another discipline but wanting to make themselves more broadly marketable.

Program Level Goals

  1. Writing Goal: Students will become writers who know how to employ a wide range of strategies as they write and to use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
  2. Critical Reading and Analysis Goal:  Students will become accomplished, active readers who value ambiguity and complexity, and who can demonstrate a wide range of strategies for understanding texts, including interpretations with an awareness of, attentiveness to, and curiosity toward other perspectives.
  3. History and Theory Goal: Students will develop a comprehensive knowledge of the variety of texts in diverse time periods and in diverse locations, as well as know the critical and historical principles behind the construction of literary, linguistic, and cultural histories, in order to demonstrate an active participation in scholarship.
  4. Research Goal: Students will be able to follow a research process from proposal, research, drafts, to final projects.
  5. Collaborative Learning Goal: Students will learn that the ability to communicate their ideas to a larger audience is as important as having the ideas themselves, and that sharing and coordinating ideas sustains and develops the larger intellectual sphere, of which they are a part. Students will understand the connection between collaborative learning and their intended professional field(s), including but not limited to their future professional roles and responsibilities.

Learning Outcomes for Program Level Goals

Writing Goal:

  1. Students can write texts informed by specific (as is appropriate for the discipline and course contexts) rhetorical strategies.
  2. Students can write in several modes and for different audiences and purposes, with an awareness of the social implications and theoretical issues that these shifts raise.
  3. Students can revise for content and edit for grammatical and stylistic clarity.

Critical Reading and Analysis Goal:

  1. Students can apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, evaluate, and interpret texts. These strategies may include, but are not limited to: drawing on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, reflection, intertextuality, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, syntax, context, graphics, images).
  2. Students can evaluate the aesthetic and/or ethical value of texts.
  3. Students will demonstrate an ability to recognize how formal elements of language and genre shape meaning. They will recognize how writers can transgress or subvert generic expectations, as well as fulfill them.

History and Theory Goal:

  1. Students can demonstrate knowledge of the terminology of literary and/or cultural periods in order to be active participants in a variety of literary and/or cultural fields
  2. Students can identify and employ theoretical approaches to literary and/or cultural study (including, but not limited to, film studies, linguistics, and professional and technical writing).
  3. Students demonstrate an ability to read texts in relation to their historical and cultural contexts, in order to gain a richer understanding of both text and context, and to become more aware of themselves as situated historically and culturally.

Research Goal:

  1. Students can identify and formulate questions for productive inquiry.
  2. Students can evaluate sources for credibility, bias, quality of evidence, and quality of reasoning.
  3. Students use citation methods and structures appropriate to their field of study.

Collaborative Learning Goal:

  1. Students can effectively peer review.
  2. Students can engage in thoughtful and critical debate.
  3. Students can produce quality collaborate projects.

Requirements for Admission into the English Major

Applicants must have at least a 2.0 GPA.

Preparation for Graduate School

Students considering graduate study in English are urged to consult their advisers early in their programs. Their programs should include strong representation in the various historical periods and major authors of literature in English, as well as the various genres. Advisers may suggest additional reading to fill in gaps. If a course needed for graduate study preparation is not currently offered, it is occasionally possible to cover the same material through independent study (ENGL 499). To explore this possibility, students should consult their advisers.

Internships

Students who choose to pursue a certificate in professional writing and communication must complete a writing internship. Those majors and others interested in internships should see the department chair or those department members listed as teaching ENGL 494 in the course schedule for further information.

Recommended Courses Outside of English

To obtain appropriate background information on the literary works and figures studied in English courses, students are advised to take some of their elective credits in the following courses: U.S. History 101 and 102; Western and European History 118, 119, and 120; Philosophy 101 and 102; Art History125 and 126; and Humanities 101 and 102.

Portfolio Requirement

At the end of their last semester, English majors must submit for approval a portfolio of written work that they have completed in English courses at UW-Parkside. Unapproved portfolios must be revised before a diploma can be received. For portfolio requirements, instructions, and models of portfolios that have shown mastery, please visit our website at: http://www.uwp. edu/learn/departments/english/portfolio.cfm.

Requirements for the English Major (40 credits)

The English major consists of courses in English and related disciplines beyond the required freshman composition sequence. Students are encouraged to consult with English Department faculty advisers before declaring their major and during its completion to fulfill their program of study most expediently and comfortably.

  1. Introduction to Literature (3 credits)
    ENGL 167 Introduction to Literature 3 cr
  2. Literature of Diversity (3 credits)
    ENGL 267 Literature of Diversity 3 cr
  3. Literary Theory (3 credits)
    ENGL 266 Literary Analysis 3 cr
  4. Grammar and Language (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 287 Grammar for Teachers and Writers 3 cr
    ENGL 380 History of the English Language 3 cr
    ENGL 387 Linguistics 3 cr
  5. Shakespeare (3 credits)
    ENGL 320 Shakespeare 3 cr
  6. Classical and World Literature (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 346 Pre-1800 World Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 347 Post-1800 World Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 364 Epic and Mythology 3 cr
    ENGL 368 The Bible as Literature 3 cr
  7. British Surveys (6 credits) – Only one British survey course will be offered every semester.
    Choose two courses:  
    ENGL 316 British Literature to 1500 3 cr
    ENGL 317 British Literature, 1500-1700 3 cr
    ENGL 318 British Literature, 1700-1900 3 cr
    ENGL 319 Modern and Contemporary British Literature 3 cr
  8. American Surveys (6 credits) - Only one American survey course will be offered every semester.
    Choose two courses:  
    ENGL 326 Pre-Columbian Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 327 Puritan and Colonial American Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 328 19th Century American Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 329 20th – 21st Century American Literature 3 cr
  9. 400-Level Literature Courses (6 credits)
    Choose two courses:  
    ENGL 416 Major British Authors 3 cr
    ENGL 417 Studies in British Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 420 Advanced Shakespeare 3 cr
    ENGL 426 Major American Authors 3 cr
    ENGL 427 Studies in American Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 436 Major Modern and Contemporary Authors 3 cr
    ENGL 437 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 447 Studies in Classical and World Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 451 Studies in Literature or Culture 3 cr
    ENGL 458 Studies in Film 3 cr
    ENGL 460 Literature and Other Disciplines 3 cr
    ENGL 464 Studies in Cultural Trends 3 cr
    ENGL 468 Holocaust Studies 3 cr
    ENGL 469 Women as Writers and Characters 3 cr
  10. Senior Seminar (3 credits)
    ENGL 495 Seminar in Literature 3 cr
  11. Portfolio Workshop (1 credit)
    ENGL 477 Portfolio Workshop English 1 cr

Requirements for the English Major with the Language Arts Concentration (43 credits)

The English major with the optional concentration in language arts is intended for those who wish to pursue teacher certification. Please contact UW-Parkside’s Institute of Professional Educator Development (IPED) for additional information on pathways for elementary and high school certification and teacher training

  1. Introduction to Literature (3 credits)
    ENGL 167  Introduction to Literature 3 cr
  2. Literature of Diversity (3 credits)
    ENGL 267 Literature of Diversity 3 cr
  3. Literary Theory (3 credits)
    ENGL 266 Literary Analysis 3 cr
  4. Grammar (3 credits)
    ENGL 287 Grammar for Teachers and Writers 3 cr
  5. Language and Linguistics (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 380 History of the English Language 3 cr
    ENGL 387 Linguistics 3 cr
  6. Shakespeare (3 credits)
    ENGL 320 Shakespeare 3 cr
  7. Classical and World Literature (3 credits)
    Choose one course:    
    ENGL 364 Epic and Mythology 3 cr
    ENGL 346  Pre-1800 World Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 347 Post-1800 World Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 368 The Bible as Literature 3 cr
  8. Children’s or Young Adult Literature (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 344 Children’s Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 354 Young Adult Literature 3 cr
  9. British Survey (3 credits)
    Only one British survey course will be offered every semester.
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 316 British Literature to 1500 3 cr
    ENGL 317 British Literature, 1500-1700 3 cr
    ENGL 318 British Literature, 1700-1900 3 cr
    ENGL 319 Modern and Contemporary British Literature 3 cr
  10. American Survey (3 credits)
    Only one American survey course will be offered every semester
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 326 Pre-Columbian Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 327 Puritan and Colonial American Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 328 19th Century American Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 329 20th – 21st Century American Literature 3 cr
  11. Upper-Division Writing Course (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 306 Advanced Poetry Writing 3 cr
    ENGL 307 Advanced Fiction Writing 3 cr
    ENGL 310 Advanced Expository Writing 3 cr
    ENGL 402 Advanced Technical Writing 3 cr
    ENGL 403 Advanced Business Writing 3 cr
    ENGL 404 Non-Fiction Writing 3 cr
  12. 400-level Literature Course (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 416 Major British Authors 3 cr
    ENGL 417 Studies in British Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 420 Advanced Shakespeare 3 cr
    ENGL 426 Major American Authors 3 cr
    ENGL 427 Studies in American Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 436 Major Modern and Contemporary Authors 3 cr
    ENGL 437 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 447 Studies in Classical and World Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 451 Studies in Literature or Culture 3 cr
    ENGL 458 Studies in Film 3 cr
    ENGL 460 Literature and Other Disciplines 3 cr
    ENGL 464 Studies in Cultural Trends 3 cr
    ENGL 468 Holocaust Studies 3 cr
    ENGL 469 Women as Writers and Characters 3 cr
  13. Teaching Composition (3 credits)
    ENGL 489 Teaching and Assessing Composition 3 cr
  14. Teaching Critical Reading & Literature (3 credits)
    ENGL 488 Teaching English Language Arts 3 cr
  15. Portfolio Workshop (1 credit)
    ENGL 478 Portfolio Workshop English Language Arts 1 cr

Requirements for the English Minor (21 credits)

  1. Introduction to Literature (3 credits)
    ENGL 167 Introduction to Literature 3 cr
  2. Literary Theory (3 credits)
    ENGL 266 Literary Analysis 3 cr
  3. Shakespeare (3 credits)
    ENGL 320 Shakespeare 3 cr
  4. One 200-level Writing Course (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 201 Advanced Composition 3 cr
    ENGL 202 Technical Writing 3 cr
    ENGL 204 Writing for Business and Industry 3 cr
    ENGL 206 Creative Writing – Poetry 3 cr
    ENGL 207 Creative Writing – Fiction 3 cr
  5. Three Upper-Division English Courses (9 credits)
    One course (3 credits) must be at the 400-level

Requirements for the English Language Arts for Elementary Education Minor (21 credits)

  1. Introduction to Literature (3 credits)
    ENGL 167 Introduction to Literature 3 cr
  2. Creative Writing (3 credits)
    ENGL 106 Introduction to Creative Writing 3 cr
  3. Literary Theory (3 credits)
    ENGL 266 Literary Analysis 3 cr
  4. Literature of Diversity (3 credits)
    ENGL 267 Literature of Diversity 3 cr
  5. Classic Texts (3 credits)
    Choose one:    
    ENGL 320 Shakespeare 3 cr
    ENGL 364 Epic and Mythology 3 cr
  6. Children’s Literature
    ENGL 344 Children’s Literature 3 cr
  7. Teaching and Assessing Composition
    ENGL 489 Teaching and Assessing Composition 3 cr

Requirements for the English Language Arts for Secondary Education Minor (21 credits)

  1. Introduction to Literature (3 credits)
    ENGL 167 Introduction to Literature  3 cr
  2. Literary Theory (3 credits)
    ENGL 266 Literary Analysis 3 cr
  3. Multicultural Literature (3 credits)
    ENGL 267 Literature of Diversity 3 cr
  4. Young Adult Literature (3 credits)
    ENGL 354 Young Adult Literature 3 cr
  5. Classic Texts (6 credits)
    Required (3 credits)  
    ENGL 320 Shakespeare 3 cr
         
    Choose one (3 credits)  
    ENGL 316 British Literature to 1500 3 cr
    ENGL 317 British Literature, 1500-1700 3 cr
    ENGL 318 British Literature, 1700-1900 3 cr
    ENGL 319 Modern and Contemporary British Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 327 Puritan and Colonial American Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 328 19th Century American Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 329 20th – 21st Century American Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 346 Pre-1800 World Literature 3 cr
    ENGL 347 Post-1800 World Literature 3 cr
  6. Teaching Critical Reading and Literature
    ENGL 488 Teaching English Language Arts 3 cr
  7. Teaching and Assessing Composition
    ENGL 489 Teaching and Assessing Composition 3 cr

Strongly Recommended:

ENGL 287 Grammar for Teachers and Writers 3 cr

Requirements for the Creative Writing Certificate (18 credits)

  1. Introduction to Creative Writing (3 credits)
    ENGL 106 Introduction to Creative Writing 3 cr
  2. Creative Writing – Poetry (3 credits)
    ENGL 206 Creative Writing – Poetry 3 cr
  3. Creative Writing – Fiction (3 credits)
    ENGL 207 Creative Writing – Fiction 3 cr
  4. Upper-division Requirements (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 306  Advanced Poetry Writing 3 cr
    ENGL 307 Advanced Fiction Writing 3 cr
    ENGL 310 Advanced Expository Writing 3 cr
  5. Creative Writing Capstone Project (3 credits)
    ENGL 408 Creative Writing Capstone Project 3 cr

Requirements for the Film Studies Certificate (15 credits)

Offered through the English Department and Humanities Program, the film studies certificate allows students to obtain an interdisciplinary concentration in film studies. All students awarded the film studies certificate must demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the history of film across numerous cultures, genres, and movements, as well as the major features of film study and analysis. Students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher in all film certificate course

  1. Required Courses (9 credits)
    ENGL 252/
    HUMA 252
    Introduction to Film 3 cr
    ENGL 258 History of Film to 1950 3 cr
    ENGL 259 History of Film from 1950 3 cr
  2. Elective Courses (6 credits)
    Choose two courses:  
    ENGL 290 Special Topics in English
    (film or film studies)
    3 cr
    ENGL 358 Film Genres 3 cr
    ENGL 458 Studies in Film 3 cr
    ENGL 490 Special Topics in English
    (film or film studies)
    3 cr
    ENGL 495 Seminar in Literature (film or film studies) 3 cr
    ENGL 497 Senior Thesis (film or film studies) 3 cr
    ENGL 499 Independent Study (film or film studies) 3 cr

 

Additional film courses, offered through English and other departments, may also count toward completion of the film studies certificate. These courses will be determined on a semester-by-semester basis. Please contact the English Department office.

Requirements for the Professional Writing and Communication Certificate (22 credits)

  1. Introduction to Professional Writing (3 credits)
    ENGL 168 Introduction to Professional Writing 3 cr
  2. Introduction to Digital Arts (3 credits)
    ART 104 Introduction to Digital Art 3 cr
  3. Grammar (3 credits)
    ENGL 287 Grammar for Teachers and Writers 3 cr
  4. Lower-level Professional Writing Courses (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    ENGL 202 Technical Writing 3 cr
    ENGL 204 Writing for Business and Industry 3 cr
    COMM 322 Public Relations Concepts and Practices 3 cr
  5. Special Electives and Upper-division Requirements (6 credits)
    Choose two courses:  
    ART 274 Typography I 3 cr
    ENGL 310 Advanced Expository Writing 3 cr
    ENGL 385 Professional Editing 3 cr
    ENGL 402 Advanced Technical Writing 3 cr
  6. Internship (3 credits) *
    ENGL 494  Internship in Writing and Editing 3 cr

    *This internship must be approved by the Director of the Professional Writing and Communication Certificate to ensure that it aligns with the principles of the certificate as established through the certificate curriculum.

  7. Portfolio Workshop (1 credit)
    ENGL 479 Portfolio Workshop Professional Writing 1 cr

Completing the English Major in the Evening

The English Department makes an effort to schedule the courses needed to complete the major in the evening. However, specific courses are offered less frequently in the evening than in the day, so students must plan their course work carefully. Some courses also may be offered in hybrid or online formats.

University Requirements in Reading and Writing

Most students meet the university reading and writing requirements by completing ENGL 101 with a grade of C-minus or better. Students whose placement scores indicate superior skills in these areas may satisfy the requirements in reading and writing by passing a competence exam without taking ENGL 101.

Students whose placement examinations indicate that they need more preparation before taking ENGL 101 are required to complete ENGL 100 first. Students should finish the university writing requirement as soon as possible if they are to complete their degree in a timely manner.

Teacher Education Licensure in English

Students interested in becoming teachers will need to complete an approved program pathway to a Wisconsin initial educator license.   The approved pathway to this license is a structured collaboration between English department and the Institute of Professional Educator Development (IPED).

The requirements for teacher licensure are specific and therefore students must meet with the IPED Adviser to coordinate the major and teacher education curriculum. It is very important to contact the IPED adviser at 262-595-2180 or Molinaro D111 as soon as possible. Students are required to seek advising each semester from both the IPED Adviser and the English department liaison to the teacher education program. Complete information about the Teacher Education Program can be found on the IPED website at: http://www.uwp.edu/learn/departments/educatordevelopment/index.cfm.

Courses in English (ENGL)

100 Fundamentals of English 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Introduces student to rhetorical, logical, and analytical concepts, including synthesis of rhetorical modes in the context of short essays. Emphasizes vocabulary development, reading comprehension, and the mastery of grammar and mechanics. Implements peer review and assessment. Introduces students to persuasive writing.

     
101 Composition and Reading 3 cr
 

Prereq:  Placement score or grade of C or better in ENGL 100. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Develops college-level competencies in writing and reading in a variety of subject and thematic contexts, with an emphasis on argumentation. Satisfies skills requirements in reading and writing. Lab fee required.

     
106 Introduction to Creative Writing 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines the techniques and practice of creative writing.

     
112 Women in Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Examines representations of women from classical to contemporary periods and identifies ways writing illuminates women’s experience. Works by and about women from various cultures and backgrounds are considered. Cross-listed with WGSS 112.

     
167 Introduction to Literature 3-4 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 100 or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer, Winterim.
Examines techniques of literary analysis and critical approaches to literature organized around examples of major genres (poetry, prose, and drama) selected chiefly from English and American writers. Four- credit section requires greater writing, research and a higher level of literary analysis.

     
168 Introduction to Professional Writing 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 100 with a grade of C- or better. Freq: Fall.
Introduces principles of professional writing including rhetorical principles and theoretical concepts for technical writers.

     
201 Advanced Composition 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Advanced study and practice in English composition with emphasis on exposition.

     
202 Technical Writing 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better. Freq: Yearly.
Writing instruction with an emphasis on presenting written and oral reports and interpreting technical writing.

     
204 Writing for Business and Industry 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Examines the structure, style, and format of composition as related to professional settings. Includes the writing of short forms (memoranda, correspondence) and reports that solve problems and require research and analysis.

     
206 Creative Writing – Poetry 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better. Freq: Fall.
Examines the techniques and practice of writing poetry.

     
207 Creative Writing – Fiction 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better. Freq: Fall.
Examines the techniques and practice of fiction writing

     
252 Introduction to Film 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Investigates the distinctive elements and techniques of film as art and the relationship of film to society. Cross-listed with HUMA 252.

     
253 Literature into Film 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 100. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Examines film adaptions of literary texts alongside the literature itself. Emphasizes the formal characteristics of the works, their aesthetic and ethical importance, and the interpretive questions raised by the act of adaptation. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
258 History of Film to 1950 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Examines the development of film techniques, visual qualities, genre, theory and cinematic art from the silent era to around 1950.

     
259 History of Film from 1950 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Spring.
Examines the development of film techniques, visual qualities, genre, theory and cinematic art from around 1950 to the present.

     
266 Literary Analysis 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better, ENGL 167. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Introduces literary theory and literary research practices, requiring close interaction with primary literary sources. Emphasizes original critical analysis and advanced writing skills. English majors should take this course early in their major program.

     
267 Literature of Diversity 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Surveys of literature produced by the major historically under- represented ethnic/racial groups in the U.S., that is, Native Americans, Latino/as, African Americans or Asian Americans. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
268 Introduction to Holocaust Studies 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL101 with grade of C- or better or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines historical, philosophical and other issues surrounding the Holocaust, using texts by those who experienced the Holocaust. Cross-listed with HIST 268/INTS 268.

     
287 Grammar for Teachers and Writers 3 cr
 

Prereq:  ENGL 266 or declared psychology major.  Freq: Yearly.
Studies English grammar, emphasizing concepts and terms used in teaching and writing.

     
290 Special Topics in English 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines special topics in English. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
306 Advanced Poetry Writing 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better. Freq: Yearly.
Advanced workshop in the techniques and practice of poetry writing.

     
307 Advanced Fiction Writing 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better. Freq: Yearly.
Advanced workshop in the techniques and practice of fiction writing.

     
310 Advanced Expository Writing 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101, 287; or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Advanced study and practice in English composition with emphasis on more complex projects in expository writing.

     
315 Topics in Literature and Culture 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167 or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Focuses on special topics such as “The Graphic Novel,” “Literature and Trauma,” or “Animals in Literature and Folktale”. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

     
316 British Literature to 1500 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall (odd years).
Surveys nonfiction prose, poetry, drama, and fiction, circulating in England from the sixth to the fifteenth centuries. Includes a diversity of authorial voices, both men and women, as the limitations of the period allow.

     
317 British Literature, 1500-1700 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Spring (even years).
Examines a diversity of authorial voices, both men and women, in poetry, prose, and drama written between 1500-1700 in early modern Britain.

     
318 British Literature, 1700-1900 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall (even years).
Examines diversity of authorial voices, both men and women in literary trends from the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes fiction, drama, poetry, and nonfiction prose.

     
319 Modern and Contemporary British Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Spring (odd years).
Examines fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and drama, written by a diversity of authorial voices, both men and women, and developments in the 20th and 21st Centuries.

     
320 Shakespeare 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor; or THEA 150. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Investigates the formal conventions of Shakespeare’s work, stagecraft, the location of these works within their historical contexts, and the critical and reception histories of each play. Cross-listed with THEA 320.

     
326 Pre-Columbian Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall (odd years).
Addresses narratives arising from the pre-Columbian cultures of the Americas. Focuses on specific first-nation peoples. Includes a diversity of authorial voices, both men and women, and a diversity of genres, such as fiction, drama, poetry, and non-fiction prose as the limitations of the period allow.

     
327 Puritan and Colonial American Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Spring (even years).
Studies Puritan and Colonial literatures in North America that includes a diversity of authorial voices, both men and women, and a diversity of genres, such as fiction, drama, poetry, and nonfiction prose.

     
328 19th Century American Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq:  ENGL  167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall (even years).
Studies literatures of the nineteenth-century in the United States including a diversity of authorial voices, both men and women, and a diversity of genres, such as fiction, drama, poetry, and nonfiction prose.

     
329 20th and 21st Century American Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Spring (odd years).
Examines fiction, poetry, nonfiction-prose, and drama, written by a diversity of American authorial voices, including both men and women, and developments in the 20th and 21st Centuries.

     
344 Children’s Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Investigates historical and contemporary middle-grade children’s literature, both as a cultural phenomenon and an educational resource.

     
346 Pre-1800 World Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall.
Explores selected pre-1800 global literary and cultural texts, which may include ancient, medieval and Renaissance texts. Also emphasizes non-Western works, including those with indigenous foundations. Examines the broad historical context and draws from other fields to deepen our understanding of the human experience, particularly along cross-cultural lines.

     
347 Post-1800 World Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq:  Spring.
Explores selected global literary and cultural texts produced after 1800. Also emphasizes non-Western works, including those with indigenous foundations. Examines the broad historical context and draws from other fields to deepen our understanding of the human experience, particularly along cross-cultural lines.

     
351 Puritan and Colonial American Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Spring (even years).
Delves into Puritan and Colonial literature in North America that includes a diversity of authorial voices, both men and women, and a diversity of genres, such as fiction, drama, poetry, and non-fiction prose.

     
354 Young Adult Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Yearly.
Explores representative young adult literature, including genres like fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, and realistic fiction. Selections may include graphic novels or poetry.

     
358 Film Genres 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 252, 258 or 259; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Studies film genres such as film noir, the western, the war movie, science fiction, comedy, the detective film, etc. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
364 Epic and Mythology 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 266 or consent of instructor. Freq: Yearly.
Studies major epics, with a primary focus on Greek and Roman mythology and tradition, but may include other major epics from the Western tradition.

     
366 Theory of Literature and Criticism 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 266. Freq: Occasionally.
Investigates the nature of literature, the basis of literary criticism, and different critical schools at an advanced level. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
368 The Bible as Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Explores the literary and cultural background, qualities, and influence of the Jewish and Christian scriptures.

     
380 History of the English Language 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 266. Freq: Yearly.
Examines historical shifts in the English language, including phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon, and semantics.

     
385 Professional Editing 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better. Freq: Spring.
Explores principles and practical applications of copymarking, copyediting, and comprehensive editing.

     
387 Linguistics 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 266. Freq: Occasionally.
Explores major areas in the study of language, including phonology, syntax, semantics, historical, comparative linguistics and socio- linguistics.

     
390 Special Topics in English 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines selected topics in English. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
402 Advanced Technical Writing 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 202 or 204; or consent of instructor. Freq: Yearly.
Emphasizes writing and editing skills needed to prepare a project such as a procedures manual, report of experimental findings or proposals.

     
403 Advanced Business Writing 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 202 or 204; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Continues the study of business writing and communication.

     
404 Non-Fiction Writing 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 201, 204; or consent of instructor. Freq: Yearly.
Explores writing feature-length articles, historical accounts, reviews, opinion pieces, advanced essays. Employs various professional writing styles.

     
408 Creative Writing Capstone Project 3 cr
 

Prereq: Two of the following: ENGL 306, 307, or 310. Freq: Yearly.
A creative writing capstone course culminating in a significant body of poetry or fiction along with a self-reflexive essay wherein students place themselves within a broader literary tradition.

     
416 Major British Authors 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Studies one or more major British authors. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
417 Studies in British Literature 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines specific topics, issues, or time periods in British Literature. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
420 Advanced Shakespeare 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 266. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines Shakespearean genres (tragedy, history, comedy, romance), dramaturgy, and themes as well as related topics such as Shakespeare and film adaptation at the advanced level

     
426 Major American Authors 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Explores one or more major American authors at the advanced level. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
427  Studies in American Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines specific topics, issues, or time periods in American literature. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
436 Major Modern and Contemporary Authors 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Delves into one or more major contemporary authors at an advanced level. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
437 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines such topics as the hero in modern literature, innovations in 20th century drama or experiments in literary form. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
447 Studies in Classical and World Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 266. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines a specific culture, author, or theme in Classical or other world literatures. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
451 Studies in Literature or Culture 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Focuses on special topics, such as “The Graphic Novel”, “Literature and Trauma,” or “Animals in Literature and Folktale”. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
458 Studies in Film 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines movements, techniques, theories, national cinemas, genres, directors, or periods. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
460 Literature and Other Disciplines 1-6 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Investigates the relation of literature to disciplines such as science, sociology, psychology, music, or philosophy. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
464 Studies in Cultural Trends 1-6 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266; or consent of Instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines the intersection of literature and cultural trends. Includes graphic novels, steampunk, and the gothic. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
468 Holocaust Studies 3 cr
 

Prereq:  ENGL 266; and 167 or a 200-level survey; or consent of instructor.  Freq:  Occasionally.
Intensive study of various aspects of the Holocaust, such as literature of the Holocaust, film and the Holocaust, literature of the Second Generation, etc. Cross-listed with HIST 468/HUMA 468.

     
469 Women as Writers and Characters 1-6 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines writing by women and depictions of women in literature. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Cross-listed with WGSS 469.

     
477 Portfolio Workshop English 1 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 266; senior standing. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Required capstone portfolio. Includes reflective writing and metacognition, workshopping, revision, and mastery of department outcomes.

     
478 Portfolio Workshop English Language Arts 1 cr
 

Prereq:  ENGL  266, senior standing. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Required capstone portfolio. Includes reflective writing and metacognition, workshopping, revision, and mastery of department outcomes.

     
479 Portfolio Workshop Professional Writing 1 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a C- or better. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Required capstone portfolio. Includes reflective writing and metacognition, workshopping, revision, and mastery of the professional writing certificate outcomes

     
487 Studies in Language 1-6 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 187 or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
An examination of such topics as language in American culture, regional dialects, semantics, etc. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
488 Teaching English Language Arts 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266. Freq: Yearly.
Explores balanced literacy methods and materials for integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and critical thinking activities into a language arts program for adolescents.

 
     
489 Teaching and Assessing Composition 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 266, senior standing. Freq: Yearly.
Explores methods and materials for the teaching and assessment of composition.

     
490 Special Topics in English 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 167, 266. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines cultural trends or topics in English literature at the advanced level. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
493 Internship in Teaching Literature 1-6 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 266, consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Offers an internship experience with an instructor teaching in a literature course. Students will create a portfolio.

     
494 Internship in Writing and Editing 1-6 cr
 

Prereq: Consent of instructor and department chair. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Practical application of professional-level writing skills in such areas as journalism, copy editing, technical, scientific, industrial, business, and legal writing, under joint supervision of a faculty member and organization representative. A maximum number of internship credits will be set by the faculty member, in keeping with university policy.

     
495 Seminar in Literature 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 266 or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Serves as the capstone class for the major and includes discussion of career preparation. Requires intensive research and writing. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
496 Internship in Teaching/Tutoring 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 489 or consent of instructor and department chair. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Students select working in a composition classroom or in the Tutoring Center as a writing tutor to gain experience in major aspects of composition instruction. Students must secure permission from a composition instructor or the Tutoring Center in order to register. Students will create a teaching/tutoring portfolio.

     
497 Senior Thesis 3 cr
 

Prereq: Consent of instructor and English Department Executive Committee. Freq: Occasionally.
Conduct independent research and write an essay of substantial length under faculty supervision. Agreement of faculty member to undertake supervision is necessary before registration.

     
499 Independent Study 1-6 cr
 

Prereq: Consent of instructor and English Department Executive Committee. Freq: Occasionally.
Conduct independent research and write an essay of substantial length under faculty supervision. Agreement of faculty member to undertake supervision is necessary before registration.

     

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