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Geography and Anthropology

UW-PARKSIDE 2017-19 CATALOG

Molinaro 367 • 262-595-3416

College:
Social Sciences and Professional Studies

Degree and Programs Offered:
Bachelor of Arts

Major – Geography

Minors - Anthropology, Geographic Information Systems, Geography, Geography for Teachers

Certificate - Geographic Information Systems

Concentrations – Anthropology, Applied Environmental Geography, Planning

Student Organizations/Clubs:
Parkside Geography Club

Parkside Anthropological Society

Career Possibilities:
Students who major in geography are well prepared for careers in many fields including environmental analysis and management, geographic information systems (GIS), community development, urban planning, and teaching. In addition, geography is a dynamic liberal arts major which combines cultural perspectives and analytical skills. Opportunities for employment are wide ranging. Employers understand that geography graduates possess a wide variety of professional abilities. Possible employers include mapping firms, environmental agencies, planning departments, site selection companies, marketing departments, school districts, emergency management agencies, nonprofit organizations, and defense agencies.

Anthropology graduates work in a wide range of settings, including cultural resource management and contract archaeology; museum work; forensic anthropology; and user design or ethnographic analysis for public or private institutions, both in the U.S. and internationally. Opportunities exist to apply anthropological knowledge to many problems of modern society, including the social impact of development, economic and political change, and cultural and natural resource management. 

Department Overview

Geography is the study of the distribution, variation, and interrelation of the natural and cultural features of the Earth’s surface. The UW-Parkside geography curriculum is designed to reflect the complexity of society and nature so that students will gain an understanding of the varied spatial factors that influence life in today’s interconnected world. The geography department’s mission is to extend geographic knowledge through exceptional educational programs, research projects, and service activities using advanced technology to train students and to solve problems. Geography’s mission is important because aspects of place, area, location, and distribution are essential to resolving issues facing the region, the country and the world. Understanding global, national, and local patterns of economic activity, urban problems, cultural differences and environmental change is vital and emphasized within the department.

Anthropology focuses on cultural and biological adaptations of all humankind, whether past or present. It is the comparative study of human life and culture, past and present. It is concerned with human biological and cultural adaptations to physical and social environments through time and in all parts of the world. The basic themes of anthropology include adaptation, evolution, change, and continuity. Anthropology is marked by specific methods from archaeological digs to ethnographic observation, focusing on systematic observations of how people live with each other, their belief systems, and how they make a living.

Students interested in geography have several options. Some students complete a general major in geography; many students include as part of their geography major one or more of the following:

  • Concentration in Anthropology
  • Concentration in Planning
  • Concentration in Applied Environmental Geography
  • Geographic Information Systems Minor*
  • Certificate in Geographic Information Systems
    * Students cannot earn both the GIS minor and the certificate in GIS.

The concentration in anthropology focuses primarily on anthropology and has a different set of core courses.

The department also offers a geography minor and an anthropology minor.

Students wanting to combine geography with teaching licensure can pursue a geography major and early adolescence – adolescence (grades 6-12) licensure or broad field social studies licensure with a geography minor for teacher candidates. See the Institute of Professional Educator Development for more information.

Opportunities to assist in faculty research projects permit students to learn research tools used in geography and anthropology, and to apply concepts learned in the classroom. For example, students might learn how to take soil samples in the field, to analyze tree rings in the lab, to measure quality of life in segregated neighborhoods, or to use GIS for mapping, analysis, and decision making; they might collect oral histories to learn about how people think about their communities or participate in an archaeological dig. In addition, students can gain service experiences through community- based learning projects.

PROGRAM LEVEL OUTCOMES

  1. Knowledge: [global perspective and individual accountability] The goal is to educate students with fundamental geographic and anthropological knowledge and concepts in the major areas of physical geography, human geography, and anthropology, while comprehending the interrelationships between the environment/nature and human activities.
  2. Analytical and Technical Skills: [analytical skills; information technology competence] The goal is to train students to utilize a variety of tools: maps, statistics, field methods, geographic information systems, and global positioning systems in geography; and anthropological field methods such as archaeological excavation and ethnographic interviewing as well as analysis of material culture or meanings and social relationships, all using appropriate technologies where available.
  3. Synthesize and Communicate: [critical thinking; literacy and oral communication] The goal is for students to develop critical thinking skills to conduct research and solve problems: review literature, collect and analyze data using a variety of methods, and present the results.

Preparation for Graduate School

A major in geography provides excellent preparation for students seeking graduate study and degrees in geography, urban planning, environmental studies, international affairs, resource management, and other related fields.

Those opting for a concentration in anthropology are likewise qualified to enter graduate programs in a variety of fields, including historic preservation, cultural resource management, forensic anthropology, museum studies, global studies, international development, as well as find work in a range of public and private settings, such as in nonprofit social organizations, government agencies, and businesses. 

Internships

The department is strengthened by an internship program with placement in local public or private sector locations. Students can gain valuable experience in a variety of real-world settings which increases their skills and adds to their resumes.

Requirements for the Geography Major (40-46 credits)

  1. Core Courses (28-29 credits)
    Geography majors are required to complete the following courses or their equivalents; geography majors choosing a concentration in anthropology have a different set of required core courses and electives to allow for a heavier focus on anthropology. The full list of requirements for the geography major with a concentration in anthropology are listed together under the anthropology concentration section (B.4.).

    1. Required Core Courses (19 credits)
      GEOG 100 Physical Geography and the Environment 4 cr
      GEOG 110 Intro to Geography-World Regions 3 cr
      GEOG 250 Map Use and Analysis 3 cr
      GEOG 300 Geographic Methods*  3 cr
      GEOG 350 Cartography and GIS 3 cr
      GEOG 495 Senior Seminar 3 cr
      *or approved course in statistics  
    2. Elective Core Courses (9-10 credits)
      1. Human Geography Elective (3 credits)
        Choose one course:  
        GEOG 101 Geography of American Ethnicity and Race 3 cr
        GEOG 105 Contemporary Human Geography 3 cr
        GEOG 108 Culture and Environmental Sustainability 3 cr
      2. Economic Geography Elective (3 credits)
        Choose one course:  
        GEOG 215 Economic Geography 3 cr
        GEOG 360 Urban Geography 3 cr
      3. Advanced Physical Geography Elective (3-4 credits)
        Choose one course:  
        GEOG 324 Landforms and Environmental Processes 4 cr
        GEOG 326 Biogeography 3 cr
        GEOG 382 Soil Ecosystems and Resources 4 cr
        GEOG 384 Landscape Ecology 4 cr
        GEOG 396 Field Methods in Geography 4 cr
  2. Upper-level Major Courses (12-15 credits)
    Choose one of the major completion options below:

    1. General Geography Major (12 credits)
      The general major is designed to provide students a broad background in geography.
      Choose 12 credits of 300-level and above GEOG courses

    2. Concentration in Planning (12-13 credits)
      The concentration in planning is for geography majors interested in careers or graduate study in urban and regional planning, business planning, environmental planning, or related fields.

      1. Required Courses (9 credits)
        GEOG 360 Urban Geography 3 cr
        GEOG 365 Geography in Land Use Planning 3 cr
        GEOG 375 Geography of Transportation 3 cr
      2. Elective Course (3-4 credits)
        Choose one course:  
        GEOG 330 Population Geography 3 cr
        GEOG 340 Political Geography 3 cr
        GEOG 384 Landscape Ecology 4 cr
        GEOG 390 Special Topics in Geography* 3 cr
        GEOG 491 Special Topics in GIS* 3 cr
        GEOG 494 Internship in Geography*  3 cr

        *NOTE:  Must have substantial planning content/project and be approved by the Department.

    3. Concentration in Applied Environmental Geography (12-16 credits)
      This concentration allows geography majors to emphasize physical geography and environmental analysis through a combination of classroom, lab, and field experiences. A career in environmental management is one example of where this concentration could be used.

      Choose Four Courses (12-16 credits)
      GEOG 306 Natural Disasters and Society 3 cr
      GEOG 308 Conservation of Natural Resources 3 cr
      GEOG 323 Climate Change 3 cr
      GEOG 324 Landforms and Environmental Processes 4 cr
      GEOG 326 Biogeography 3 cr
      GEOG 382 Soil Ecosystems and Resources 4 cr
      GEOG 384 Landscape Ecology 4 cr
      GEOG 396 Field Methods in Geography 4 cr
      GEOG 494 Internship in Geography* 3 cr

      *Note that GEOG 494 must be with an approved agency/ organization or other suitable site in order to count for this concentration.

    4. Concentration in Anthropology (45-46 Credits for major)
      This concentration allows students to emphasize anthropology. This concentration takes a four-field approach, covering cultural, linguistic, biological anthropology and archaeology. The core course requirements for the anthropology concentration differ from the other geography major completion options to allow for more appropriate anthropology courses.

      1. Required Core Courses (9-10 credits)
        GEOG 100 Physical Geography and the Environment 4 cr
        OR    
        GEOG 105 Contemporary Human Geography 3 cr
             
        GEOG 350 Cartography and GIS 3 cr
        GEOG 495 Senior Seminar 3 cr
      2. Required Overview Courses (12 credits)
        ANTH 100 Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr
        ANTH 200 Cultural Anthropology 3 cr
        ANTH 201 Introduction to Archaeology 3 cr
        ANTH 202 Human Evolution 3 cr
      3. Methods, Theory, and Fieldwork Courses (15 credits)
        SOCA 250 Statistics for the Social Sciences
        A substitution of an appropriate statistics course for student’s interest may be chosen in consultation with advisor
        4 cr
        SOCA 295 Social Science Research Methods 2 cr
             
        ANTH 300 Topics in Data Collection and Analysis 3 cr
        OR    
        SOCA 300 Topics in Data Collection and Analysis 3 cr
             
        ANTH 302 Anthropological Theory 3 cr
        OR
           
        SOCA 301 Introduction to Sociological Theory 3 cr
             
        ANTH 491 Anthropology Fieldwork 3 cr
      4. Regional Ethnographic Elective (3 credits)
        Choose one course:  
        ANTH 227 North American Indians 3 cr
        ANTH 228 Peoples of Southeast Asia 3 cr
      5. Elective Courses (6 credits)
        Choose two courses:  
        ANTH 310 Forensic Anthropology 3 cr
        ANTH 312 Anthropology of Language 3 cr
        ANTH 315 Anthropology of Non-Western Art 3 cr
        ANTH 327 Archaeology of North America 3 cr
        ANTH 357 Livelihoods, Exchange, and Globalization 3 cr
        ANTH 362 Migration and Immigration 3 cr
        ANTH 382 Environmental Anthropology 3 cr
        ANTH 390 Special Topics in Anthropology 3 cr
        ANTH 455 International Development and Change 3 cr
        ANTH 490 Special Topics in Anthropology 3 cr
        ANTH 494 Internship in Anthropology 1-4 cr
        ANTH 499 Independent Study 1-4 cr
        GEOG 330 Population Geography 3 cr
        GEOG 340 Political Geography 3 cr
        GEOG 360 Urban Geography 3 cr
        GEOG 455 Remote Sensing 3 cr
        SOCA 325 Comparative Race and Ethnic Relations 3 cr
        SOCA 328 Asians in American Society 3 cr

 

Requirements for the Anthropology Minor (21 credits)

The minor in anthropology consists of a minimum of 21 credits, distributed as follows:

  1. Required Course (3 credits)
    ANTH 100 Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr
  2. Required Overview Courses (9 credits)
    ANTH 200 Cultural Anthropology 3 cr
    ANTH 201 Introduction to Archaeology 3 cr
    ANTH 202 Human Evolution 3 cr
  3. Elective Courses (9 credits)
    A minimum of 6 credits must be upper-level (300 or 400 level).

    Choose courses to reach a minimum of 9 credits:  
    ANTH 227 North American Indians 3 cr
    ANTH 228 Peoples of Southeast Asia 3 cr
    ANTH 290 Special Topics in Anthropology 3 cr
    ANTH 300 Topics in Data Collection and Analysis 3 cr
    ANTH 302 Anthropological Theory 3 cr
    ANTH 310 Forensic Anthropology 3 cr
    ANTH 312 Anthropology of Language  3 cr
    ANTH 315 Anthropology of Non-Western Art 3 cr
    ANTH 327 Archaeology of North America 3 cr
    ANTH 357 Livelihoods, Exchange, and Globalization 3 cr
    ANTH 362 Migration and Immigration 3 cr
    ANTH 382 Environmental Anthropology 3 cr
    ANTH 390 Special Topics in Anthropology 3 cr
    ANTH 455 International Development and Change 3 cr
    ANTH 490 Special Topics in Anthropology 3 cr
    ANTH 491 Anthropology Fieldwork 1-3 cr
    ANTH 494 Internship in Anthropology 1-3 cr
    ANTH 499 Independent Study 1-3 cr
    SOCA 300 Topics in Data Collection and Analysis 1-3 cr
    SOCA 328 Asians in American Society 3 cr

     

Requirements for the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Minor (18-19 credits)

This minor allows students to gain additional knowledge and expertise in geographic information systems. Geographic information systems (GIS) are used to store, display, and analyze spatially referenced databases to help solve problems and to assist in decision making.  GIS is increasingly important in a variety of applications like transportation planning, business logistics, and environmental impact analysis. This minor can be earned by completing the following or their equivalents.

  1. Introductory Course (3-4 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    GEOG 100 Physical Geography and the Environment 4 cr
    GEOG 105 Contemporary Human Geography 3 cr
  2. Required Courses (9 credits)
    GEOG 250 Map Use and Analysis 3 cr
    GEOG 350 Cartography and GIS 3 cr
    GEOG 460 Introduction to GIS Analysis 3 cr
  3. Elective Courses (6 credits)
    Choose two courses:  
    GEOG 396 Field Methods in Geography*  3 cr
    GEOG 455 Remote Sensing 3 cr
    GEOG 465 Advanced GIS Applications 3 cr
    GEOG 491 Special Topics in GIS 3 cr
    GEOG 494 Internship in Geography* 3 cr
    GEOG 499 Independent Study* 3 cr
    ANTH 300 Topics in Data Collection and Analysis* 3 cr
    ANTH 491 Anthropology Fieldwork*  3 cr
     *Must have substantial GIS content/project and be approved by the Department.

Students cannot earn both the GIS minor and the GIS certificate.

Geography majors can earn this minor, but when earning the GIS minor students cannot count two of GEOG 455, 460, 465, 491, 494*, or 499* towards the major’s required 12 credits of 300-level and above geography courses.

Requirements for the Geography Minor (19 credits)

The following courses or their equivalents are required.

  1. Required Course (4 credits)
    GEOG 100 Physical Geography and the Environment 4 cr
  2. Elective 100-level Courses (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    GEOG 101 Geography of American Ethnicity and Race 3 cr
    GEOG 105 Contemporary Human Geography 3 cr
    GEOG 108 Culture and Environmental Sustainability 3 cr
    GEOG 110 Intro to Geography-World Regions 3 cr
  3. Elective 200-level Course (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    GEOG 215 Economic Geography 3 cr
    GEOG 250 Map Use and Analysis 3 cr
  4. Elective Upper-level Courses (9 credits)
    Choose 9 credits of 300-level and above GEOG courses.

Requirements for the Geography for Teachers Minor (19 credits)

The geography for teachers minor consists of a minimum of 19 credits, distributed as follows:

  1. Required Courses (13 credits)
    GEOG 100 Physical Geography and the Environment 4 cr
    GEOG 215 Economic Geography 3 cr
    GEOG 250 Map Use and Analysis 3 cr
    GEOG 315* Geography of Wisconsin 3 cr

    *This course is required of all broad field social studies licensure pathway students.

  2. Elective 100-level Courses (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    GEOG 105 Contemporary Human Geography 3 cr
    GEOG 108 Culture and Environmental Sustainability 3 cr
  3. Elective 100-level Courses (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    GEOG 306 Natural Disasters and Society 3 cr
    GEOG 360 Urban Geography 3 cr

Requirements for the Geographic Information Systems Certificate (12 credits)

Geographic information systems (GIS) are used to store, display, and analyze spatially referenced databases to help solve problems and to assist in decision making.  GIS is increasingly important in a variety of applications like transportation planning, business logistics, and environmental impact analysis. This certificate can be earned by completing the following or their equivalents.

  1. Required Courses (9 credits)
    GEOG 250 Map Use and Analysis 3 cr
    GEOG 350 Cartography and GIS 3 cr
    GEOG 460 Introduction to GIS Analysis 3 cr
  2. Elective Course (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    GEOG 455 Remote Sensing 3 cr
    GEOG 465 Advanced GIS Applications 3 cr
    GEOG 491 Special Topics in GIS 3 cr
    ANTH 300 Topics in Data Collection and Analysis* 3 cr
    ANTH 491 Anthropology Fieldwork* 3 cr
    *Must have substantial GIS content/project and be approved by the Department.

The GIS certificate requires a 2.25 GPA minimum in the courses for the certificate

Students cannot earn both the GIS minor and certificate

Teacher Education Licensure in Geography

Students interested in becoming teachers will need to complete an approved program pathway to a Wisconsin initial educator license. The approved pathway to this license is a structured collaboration between the geography department and the Institute of Professional Educator Development (IPED).

The requirements for teacher licensure are specific and therefore students must meet with the IPED Adviser to coordinate the major and teacher education curriculum. It is very important to contact the IPED adviser at 262-595-2180 or Molinaro D111 as soon as possible. Students are required to seek advising each semester from both the IPED Adviser and the geography department liaison to the teacher education program. Complete information about the teacher education program can be found on the IPED website at: http://www.uwp.edu/learn/departments/educatordevelopment/index.cfm

Courses in Geography (GEOG)

Undergraduate Courses

100 Physical Geography and the Environment 4 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Investigates the patterns and processes of Earth’s physical and biological systems and their influence on human behavior and distribution. Includes human impacts on climate, hydrologic cycle, and ecosystem development.

     
101 Geography of American Ethnicity and Race 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Summer.
American ethnic and racial patterns from a distinctly geographic perspective. Historical forces shaping the geographical patterns of race and ethnicity as well as contemporary issues in ethnic and race relations including immigration.

     
105 Contemporary Human Geography 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Spring.
An overview of significant themes in human geography including population issues, cultural differences, globalization, languages, politics and foreign affairs, settlement patterns, migration, and economic organization.

     
108 Culture and Environmental Sustainability 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Explores interrelationships of cultural and natural systems, need for sustainability, and how different cultural groups view nature.   Varying perspectives on environmentalism and what going green means to different parts of society.  Resolving environmental problems and building sustainable futures.

     
110 Introduction to Geography-World Regions 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Studies the cultural and physical characteristics of major world regions. Examines how people live in different parts of the world. Emphasizes globalization, environmentalism, and geographic perspectives on current international issues.

     
215 Economic Geography 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Spring.
Analysis of the factors which influence the spatial patterns of economic activities and economic variables. The geography of transportation systems, labor supplies, markets, trade, technology, and government regulations. Investigation of how geography affects economic processes and problems.  Introductory course in geography recommended.

     
250 Map Use and Analysis 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Interpretation, analysis, and function of topographic and thematic maps. Navigation and data collection using GPS. Compass use and orienteering. Map projections and coordinate systems. Measurement and pattern analysis using maps. Air photo interpretation. Hands-on experience using maps and GPS in both the classroom and the field

     
290 Special Topics in Geography 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Selected topics in geography will be examined.

     
300 Geographic Methods 3 cr
 

Prereq: Junior standing and 9 credits in geography; or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall.
Introduction to geographic concepts, methods, and procedures. Applications of selected descriptive and inferential statistical methods to geographic problems. Hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. Analysis of point patterns.

     
306 Natural Disasters and Society 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Exploration of natural disasters and their impacts on humans. Topics include earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, asteroid and comet impacts. Disaster planning and mitigation, GIS applications in disaster management.

     
308 Conservation of Natural Resources 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Summer.
Examination of significant environmental issues. Policies and problems in the use and management of natural resources. Energy alternatives, climate change, water resources issues, endangered species, and others.  Selected topics taken from southeastern Wisconsin.

     
310 Geography of the United States and Canada 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Covers the physical features, resources, people, settlement patterns, historical geography, land utilization and economic development of the United States and Canada. Particular emphasis on environmental issues, economic ties, and political relations

     
315 Geography of Wisconsin 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Describes Wisconsin’s characteristics and compares the state to the rest of the United States. Explores patterns of history, statewide issues from a geographic perspective.

     
320 Regional Geography 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Explores the physical and cultural features of a selected region with emphasis on past and present spatial patterns. Included geographic viewpoints on current issues and problems within the region. May be taken for credit each time a different region is studied.

     
323 Climate Change 3 cr
 

Prereq: GEOG 100.  Freq: Occasionally.
Investigates characteristics, processes, distribution, classification and geographical significance of Earth’s climates. Causes and consequences of climate change, especially its impacts on human populations.

     
324 Landforms and Environmental Processes 4 cr
 

Prereq: GEOG 100 or GEOS 100.  Freq: Occasionally.
Examines Earth’s landforms concerning their characteristics, processes, and distribution. Focuses on historical geology, tectonic events, rock formation, glaciations, river systems, soil development and consequences for humans. Includes field trip, lab applications, and aerial photo interpretation.

 
     
326 Biogeography 3 cr
 

Prereq: GEOG 100 or BIOS 100, 102 or 104. Freq: Occasionally.
Focuses on the distribution of biodiversity in space and time. Includes plant identification, ecological and evolutionary patterns, conservation, restoration ecology, paleodynamics, and human impacts on species distributions.  Includes field trips.

     
330 Population Geography 3 cr
 

Prereq: A course in geography. Freq: Occasionally.
Geographic factors that influence patterns of human settlement and existence. Examines population distributions and growth as related to environmental and resource issues. Are there too many people on Earth? How do the demographics of the United States compare to other parts of the world? Includes case studies, applications, and methods of analysis.

     
340 Political Geography 3 cr
 

Prereq: A course in geography. Freq: Occasionally.
Geographical explanation of the political organization of space and territory. Issues are explored at scales ranging from global to local. Globalization, nationalism, boundary problems, regional conflict, ethnic nationalism, and the local context for planning and policy are stressed.

     
350 Cartography and GIS 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Spring.
Examines cartographic theory and methods and GIS technology. Covers the history of cartography, role of maps in society, quantitative and qualitative thematic mapping, and maps as both art and science. Explains digital cartographic design and data processing using GIS.

     
360 Urban Geography 3 cr
 

Prereq: A course in geography. Freq: Fall.
Focuses on characteristics of urban regions. Analysis of the factors that determine urban development as well as patterns within urban areas. Transportation and housing issues.  Ethnic neighborhoods and urban government. Urban planning models and practices are introduced to study urban problems like poverty, congestion, crime and infrastructure.

     
365 Geography in Land Use Planning 3 cr
 

Prereq: A course in geography. Freq: Spring.
A detailed examination of the forces and factors that shape contemporary land use patterns in the United States.   The study of the concepts, theories, and tools of land use planning.  How planning leads to more efficient, productive, and pleasant urban and rural environments.  Uses selected case studies from southeastern Wisconsin and northern Illinois.

     
375 Geography of Transportation 3 cr
 

Prereq: A course in geography. Freq: Occasionally.
The significance of transportation within the modern world. Geographic analysis of transportation systems with emphasis on networks, costs, new technologies, commodity flows, traffic patterns, impacts on development, the different modes, and transportation problems. Transportation planning is included.

     
382 Soil Ecosystems and Resources 4 cr
 

Prereq: GEOG 100. Freq: Occasionally.
Understanding of soils as both natural bodies and as managed resources. Students learn how soil science fits into the broader topic of physical geography by exploring physical and chemical properties of soils, plant nutrition from soils, environmental impacts of climate, geomorphology, organisms on soils, and how soils are managed. Includes lab and field experience

     
384 Landscape Ecology 3 cr
 

Prereq: GEOG 100 or 326 or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall.
Focuses on how spatial structure affects ecosystem processes and biodiversity at the landscape level. Concepts include landscape scale, natural disturbances, animal movements, patch dynamics, design of nature reserves, and the wildland-urban interface.

     
390 Special Topics in Geography 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Selected topics in geography will be examined.

     
396 Field Methods in Geography 4 cr
 

Prereq: Consent of instructor. Freq: Fall.
Application of geographic concepts, scientific inquiry, methods, and tools in a hands-on field setting. Current focus is on understanding patterns of biodiversity in natural habitats, assessing native ecosystems as influenced by human activities, and designing sampling methods to quantify vegetation dynamics. Techniques can include taxonomy keys, dendrochronology, soil sampling, and spatial statistics. May be taken for credit each time a different focus or area is studied. Additional fees required.  Field trips required.

     
455 Remote Sensing 3 cr
 

Prereq: GEOG 250 or 350 or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Overview of remote-sensing systems (airborne and satellite). Principles of photographic and electromagnetic remote sensing systems which detect, record and measure distributions of natural and cultural phenomena. Interpretation of aerial and orbital imagery for urban planning and environmental research.

     
460 Introduction to GIS Analysis 3 cr
 

Prereq: GEOG 250 or 350 or consent of instructor. Freq: Fall.
Introduction to spatial analysis using GIS technology.  Data acquisition, integration, and editing. Spatial analysis of natural and cultural phenomena using both vector and raster data models.  Application of GIS technologies to environmental management and urban planning. Field based data collection using GPS.   Focus on local community issues.  Individual and group projects.

     
465 Advanced GIS Applications 3 cr
 

Prereq: GEOG 460 or consent of instructor. Freq: Spring.
Advanced topics in GIS concepts and applications. Data collection and integration, spatial analysis, and project management. Terrain analysis using Digital Elevation Models. Advanced application of GIS technology to environmental management and urban planning. Exploration of GIS related job opportunities and the future of GIS technology. Focus on local community issues.  Individual and group projects.

     
490 Special Topics in Geography 1-3 cr
 

Prereq: Consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Selected topics in geography will be examined.

     
491 Special Topics in GIS 3 cr
 

Prereq: GEOG 350 or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines selected topics and applications in Geographic Information Systems.

     
494 Internship in Geography 1-12 cr
 

Prereq: Junior standing, geography or related major, 2.75 GPA in geography courses, and consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Practical application of geographic concepts, methods, and technologies. By working in planning agencies, GIS departments, environmental organizations, other private or public units, students gain real-world experience. Enrollment dependent on availability of suitable placement. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits with up to 6 credits toward the major.

     
495 Senior Seminar 3 cr
 

Prereq: Senior standing, geography or related major. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Capstone course applying   knowledge, concepts, and   methods of geography. Includes completing a major research project and communicating the results.

     
499 Independent Study 1-3 cr
 

Prereq: Junior standing, 2.25 overall GPA, and consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Under instructor supervision, individual investigation of a topic related to geography. Maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward the major.

     


Graduate Courses

596 Field Methods in Geography 4 cr
 

Prereq: Consent of instructor. Freq: Fall.
Extensive application of geographic concepts, scientific inquiry, methods, and tools in a hands-on field setting. Focus is on understanding patterns of biodiversity in natural habitats, assessing native ecosystems as influenced by human activities, and designing sampling methods to quantify vegetation dynamics. Techniques can include taxonomy keys, dendrochronology, soil sampling, and spatial statistics. May be taken for credit each time a different focus or area is studied. Additional fees required.  Field trips required.

     
690 Special Topics in Geography 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Advanced study on selected topics in geography.

     

 

Courses in Anthropology (ANTH)

100 Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Introduces the four fields in anthropology: biological anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, and linguistic anthropology as well as an overview of applied anthropology.

     
200 Cultural Anthropology 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or GEOG 105 or INTS 100. Freq: Fall.
Introduces cross-cultural analysis of social structures and cultural systems, as well as changes due to economic, political, and cultural globalization. Cross-listed with INTS 210.

     
201 Introduction to Archaeology 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or GEOG 100 or GEOG 105. Freq: Spring.
Digs into concepts and methods for the scientific study of prehistoric cultures, including field methods, laboratory analysis, archaeological theory, and major trends in world prehistory and historical archaeology.

     
202 Human Evolution 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or GEOG 100 or GEOG 105. Freq: Fall.
Analyzes the fossil evidence for human evolution. Explores modern human genetics, evolutionary theory, and biological variation within the human species.

     
227 North American Indians 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or SOCA 101. Freq: Fall (even years).
Surveys American Indian peoples of the United States and Canada focusing on various aspects of culture, history and recent culture change. Cross-listed with SOCA 227.

     
228 Peoples of Southeast Asia 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or GEOG 105 or INTS 100. Freq: Spring
Introduces the peoples and cultures of Southeast Asia, including the mainland and islands; focuses on cultures, history, socioeconomic conditions, and the everyday life of people. Cross-listed with INTS 228.

     
290 Special Topics in Anthropology 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100. Freq: Occasionally.
Explores special topics in anthropology.

     
300 Topics in Data Collection and Analysis 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or SOCA 101. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Develops skills in specific methods of data collection and analysis in anthropology. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic.

     
302 Anthropological Theory 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or SOCA 101; and junior standing. Freq: Spring (even years).
Examines historical and contemporary theories in social and cultural anthropology, application of theories in current research and explanation of people’s cultures and relationships.

     
310 Forensic Anthropology 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 202. Freq: Spring (odd years).
Investigates human osteology, involving the identification of human skeletal remains for legal and scientific purposes; including establishing age, sex, biological background, stature, trauma, abnormalities of growth, and details of health and nutritional history. Lecture and lab.

     
312 Anthropology of Language 3 cr
 

Prereq:  ANTH 100 or 202; or GEOG 105. Freq: Fall (even years).
Introduces concepts of linguistics and communication used in anthropology, including phonetics, historical linguistics, language acquisition, cognition and how meaning is formed through linguistic interactions, and modes of communication in different social settings.

     
315 Anthropology of Non-Western Art 3 cr
 

Prereq:  ANTH 100 or ART 100 or ART 125. Freq: Occasionally
Examines indigenous arts and material culture with focus on functions of art related to social organization, belief systems, and culture change; includes selected prehistoric and contemporary art forms. Cross-listed with ART 315.

     
327 Archaeology of North America 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or 201. Freq: Spring (even years).
Examines evidence for human migration to the New World and subsequent cultural developments in all major regions of North America north of Mexico.

     
357 Livelihoods, Exchange, and Globalization 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or GEOG 105 or SOCA 101. Freq: Fall (odd years).
Analyzes comparative economic organizations emphasizing non-state societies from cross-cultural perspective. Emphasizes exchange, diverse ways of making a living, and economic change with colonialism and globalization.

     
362 Migration and Immigration 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or SOCA 101. Freq: Spring (even years).
Examines migration and immigration as major processes of change in the United States and internationally, focusing on migrant communities, social networks, and work activities. Cross-listed with SOCA 362.

     
382 Environmental Anthropology 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100 or GEOG 105. Freq: Fall (odd years).
Examines anthropological human/environmental relations. Discusses ecological concepts and processes in relation to past and present human life, in simple and complex societies. Focuses on anthropological perspectives on current environmental problems as aspects of the cultural adaptation to natural and social environments.

     
390 Special Topics in Anthropology 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100. Freq: Occasionally.
Explores special topics in anthropology.

     
455 International Development and Change 3 cr
 

Prereq: 6 credits of upper-level ANTH or SOCA courses. Freq: Occasionally.
Analyzes comparative social change and international development, focusing on theories of change, the role of development agencies, and case studies of development projects. Cross-listed with SOCA 455.

     
490 Special Topics in Anthropology 3 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100, 6 credits of upper-level ANTH. Freq: Occasionally.
Delves into special topics in anthropology.

     
491 Anthropology Fieldwork 1-10 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100; consent of instructor and department chair. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Provides field research experience with faculty supervision.

     
494 Internship in Anthropology 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100, junior standing; consent of instructor and department chair.
Provides opportunities for community experience emphasizing practical application of anthropology in suitable settings.

     
499 Independent Study 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: ANTH 100, junior standing; consent of instructor and department chair.
Provides opportunity for independent work on specific problems in anthropology under faculty supervision.

     

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