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Liberal Studies


UW-PARKSIDE 2017-19 CATALOG

RITA/CART 235/221 • 262-595-2139/2609

College:
Arts and Humanities

Degree and Programs Offered:
Bachelor of Arts

Major - Liberal Studies

Certificate – Leadership

Major Concentrations - Cinema and Film Studies; Humanities; Social Sciences Studies; Organizational Studies; and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Career Possibilities:

There are many possible careers for liberal studies graduates, depending on how students plan their coursework. Graduates of the program may enroll in graduate programs, including business and law school, while others may find employment in a diverse range of occupations, including teaching, finance, graphic design, and the legal field.

Program Overview

MISSION
Our mission is to provide flexible, innovative degree programs to students whose needs and interests are not limited to a single discipline. Grounded in the liberal arts tradition, we prepare graduates to:

  • Communicate effectively
  • Think critically and creatively
  • Make connections across disciplines
  • Become knowledgeable, engaged citizens of our local and global communities
  • Assume leadership roles and apply their knowledge in all areas of their professional and personal lives

The liberal studies major is a suitable degree-completion option for transfer and returning students, including working adults interested in career advancement.

VISION
We believe that students educated in the liberal arts tradition will have the skills to meet the many challenges of today’s workplace. Moreover, students who have the flexibility to choose advanced classes in multiple disciplines can design a major that better addresses their individual career goals. Liberal studies is committed to helping students create their own paths to degree completion, career success, and ultimately a more fulfilling quality of life. We envision our program, students, and graduates helping to shape a community that is intellectually engaged, globally connected, environmentally responsible, diverse, and inclusive.

Program Competency Areas

The flexible liberal studies curriculum is guided by six areas in which students are expected to demonstrate competency. These areas should guide students’ course selection as well as their focus within particular courses. Understanding of the competencies is demonstrated by the successful completion of a senior seminar project.  The competency areas are as follows:

Communication:
Effective communication skills include listening, speaking, reading, writing, and information literacy.

Ethical Reasoning and Action:
Individual, social, and environmental responsibility includes civic knowledge and engagement (both global and local).

History:
Recognizing patterns in past events and seeing their relevance to present-day life; demonstrating how contemporary social issues are rooted in past events and political choices; understanding the impacts of the social and physical environments on individual experience; and speculating in informed ways about how present-day trends might affect the future.

Critical and Creative Thinking:
The capacity to combine or synthesize existing ideas and information; comprehensively explore issues, ideas, objects, and events before reaching a conclusion.

Intercultural Knowledge:
Understanding and empathizing with people from diverse cultures; understanding societies and cultures on their own terms; interacting and working with people from diverse backgrounds; and leading or contributing support to those who lead.

Interdisciplinary Perspective:
The ability to make deliberate connections among various academic disciplines, to comprehend and participate in more than one discipline; the ability to reflect on the nature and value of an interdisciplinary perspective.

Preparation for Graduate School

Completion of a liberal studies degree is ideal preparation for graduate programs in the traditional liberal arts disciplines and other post-baccalaureate professional programs, such as law school.

Requirements for the Liberal Studies Major (30-48 credits)

Students choose from five concentrations within the liberal studies major: cinema and film studies; humanities; social sciences studies; organizational studies; and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies.

  1. Requirements for the Liberal Studies with Humanities Concentration (36 credits)
    1. Foundational Courses (6 credits)
      At this stage, students work in many different disciplines to (1) explore areas of intellectual inquiry; (2) work on the basics of writing/communicating; (3) read widely and think critically; (4) sharpen study skills; (5) begin viewing the world from multiple, global perspectives; (6) lay the foundation of basic knowledge necessary for more advanced work in individual disciplines. Students are fulfilling general education requirements, which should complement the introduction to humanities and encourage connections between classes and fields of knowledge.
       
      Choose two courses:  
      HUMA 101 Introduction to Humanities:
      World Cultures to 1500
      3 cr
      HUMA 102 Introduction to Humanities:
      World Cultures 1500 to Present
      3 cr
      HUMA 103 Diversity in the United States 3 cr

      Note: In addition to the HUMA survey courses, students need to select other general education classes at the 100-level, taking care to meet prerequisites for 200-level skills/methods courses offered by individual disciplines. For example, a student wishing to take HIST 250 need to have taken an additional HIST at the 100-level; 200-level PSYC classes require PSYC 101 completion.

    2. Skills or Methods Courses (9 credits)
      At this stage, students will move beyond the basics, gaining skills and knowledge necessary to perform well in more specialized classes for majors in two or more disciplines. Many of these courses are “gateway” classes, i.e. they are prerequisites for courses at the 300- 400 level. Students should choose classes carefully, with an eye toward the topics and fields they want to explore in greater depth as they map out their 300-400-level course work.
       
      Choose three courses (from at least two different departments):
      COMM 207 Introduction to Communication Discipline, Part I  3 cr
      COMM 208 Introduction to Communication Discipline, Part II 3 cr
      ENGL 201 Advanced Composition 3 cr
      ENGL 202 Technical Writing 3 cr
      ENGL 204 Writing for Business and Industry 3 cr
      ENGL 206  Creative Writing-Poetry 3 cr
      ENGL 207 Creative Writing-Fiction 3 cr
      ENGL 266 Literary Analysis 3 cr
      HIST 250 Sources and Methods in History 3 cr
      HUMA 252 Introduction to Film 3 cr
      ISTD 200 Introduction to Leadership 3 cr
      OR    
      Any 200-level language, art, music, theater, or philosophy course. Other 200-level, non-general education classes (for example, in the social and behavior sciences) may be used to fulfill this requirement, subject to approval of the director and steering committee, in consultation with the student and adviser.
    3. Major Concentration (18 credits)
      A combination of 300-400 level courses, selected in consultation with adviser, totaling 18 credits.  At this level, students should consider not only how classes help achieve competency goals, but how course choices enhance future career plans. Consider courses which will help the student bring unique skills, knowledge, perspectives, and experience into the profession.

    4. Senior Seminar Project (3 credits)
      LBST 498 Senior Seminar Project 3 cr
  2. Requirements for the Liberal Studies with Social Science Studies Concentration (45-46 credits)
    The distinguishing feature of the second concentration option is the independently designed theme.   Working with the liberal studies adviser, students design a course of study built around a particular theme or problem in the social and behavioral sciences. Students will be accepted as liberal studies majors and allowed to proceed with an independently designed theme after that program of study has been designed in consultation with the program adviser.

    1. Introductory Courses (9 credits)
      Choose three courses (from at least two different departments):
      ANTH 100 Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr
      ANTH 201 Introduction to Archaeology 3 cr
      COMM 107 Communication and the Human Condition 3 cr
      COMM 108 Media and Society 3 cr
      ECON 101 The American Economy 3 cr
      GEOG 100 Physical Geography and the Environment 3 cr
      GEOG 105 Contemporary Human Geography 3 cr
      GEOG 110 Introduction to Geography-World Regions 3 cr
      HIST 102 The United States, Reconstruction to Recent Times 3 cr
      HIST 120 Western Civilization III: From 1815 to the Present 3 cr
      POLS 100 American Politics 3 cr
      POLS 104 Introduction to International Relations 3 cr
      POLS 105 Introduction to Politics 3 cr
      PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychological Science 3 cr
      SOCA 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr
      WGSS 110 Introduction to Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies 3 cr
    2. Methodology Courses (3-4 credits)
      Choose one course:  
      GEOG 300 Geographic Methods 3 cr
      HIST 250 Sources and Methods in History 3 cr
      ISTD 250 Consumer Statistics 3 cr
      POLS 200 Research Methods and Sources 4 cr
      PSYC 300 Research Methods in Psychology 3 cr
           
      SOCA 250 Statistics for the Social Sciences 4 cr
      OR    
      QM 210 Business Statistics I 3 cr
           
      SOCA 295 Social Science Research Methods* 2 cr

      *This is a 2-credit course. Students who opt to complete it must consult with the interdisciplinary studies adviser with regard to the additional required credit.

    3. Scope of Coverage Courses (12 credits)
      Choose one 3-credit course from four of the following disciplines: communication, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, sociology/ anthropology, or women’s, gender and sexuality studies. The purpose of the scope of coverage requirements is to ensure the interdisciplinary nature of the student’s program.

      Courses identified as meeting the requirements of the scope of coverage section of the major may also be counted under sections A, B, and D.

    4. Theme Courses (18 credits)
      The 18 credits must revolve around or be related to some central theme or issue which the student has identified within the social and behavioral sciences. Some examples of themes chosen by current students and approved by the review committee are as follows:

      • The American Worker in Adaptation to Change
      • Poverty and Social Welfare
      • Crime and Psychological Problems Among Children
      • Illiteracy in America
      • Ethnicity and Political/Social Patterns in the U.S.
      • Politics and Mass Communication
      • Healthcare
      • Environment Policy
      • Public Education

The 18 credits of the theme must meet the following requirements:

  1. At least 15 credits must be at the 300/400 level.
  2. No more than 12 credits can be from one single department.
  3. No more than 6 credits can be earned by directed or independent study.
  4. Introductory and methods courses cannot count toward the 18 required credits in the theme.
  1. Senior Seminar Project (3 credits)
    LBST 498 Senior Seminar Project 3 cr
  1. Requirements for the Liberal Studies with Organizational Studies Concentration (36-37 credits)
    The organizational studies concentration is designed to help students understand the structures, operations, and functions of complex organizations in both public and private sector settings. Faculty members from a number of academic disciplines, including sociology/anthropology, economics, psychology, geography, history, political science, communication, philosophy, and business, provide students with a multidimensional, multiperspective, comprehensive understanding of complex organizations in our society.

    1. Foundational Courses (9 credits)
      ISTD 345 Organization Theories 3 cr

      Plus 6 credits of 100- or 200-level work in the behavioral and/or social sciences, one of which may be:

      ISTD 200 Introduction to Leadership 3 cr
    2. Statistics Course (3-4 credits)
      Choose one:  
      ISTD 250 Consumer Statistics 3 cr
      POLS 200 Research Methods and Sources 4 cr
      PSYC 250 Psychological Statistics 3 cr
      QM 210 Business Statistics I 3 cr
      SOCA 250 Statistics for the Social Sciences 4 cr
      Consult with instructor regarding prerequisites.  
    3. Concentration Courses (21 credits)
      Choose 21 credits with no more than 9 credits from one area as listed below or from the UW-Parkside catalog with consultation with your adviser.
       
      History/Political Science/Geography  
      GEOG 340 Political Geography 3 cr
      GEOG 360 Urban Geography 3 cr
      HIST/ ETHN 302
      Race/Ethnicity in the United States  of American 1890 to the Present
      3 cr
      HIST/ ETHN 333
      Contemporary American Immigration
      3 cr
      POLS 202 Public Policy 3 cr
           
      Economics/Business  
      ECON 380 The Labor Market                             3 cr
      HRM 343 Human Resource Management 3 cr
      MGT 349 Organizational Behavior 3 cr
      MGT 447 Management Techniques 3 cr
      MIS 320 Management Information Systems 3 cr
      MKT 350 Marketing Principles 3 cr
           
      Psychology/Sociology  
      ISTD 300 Human Resource Issues 3 cr
      ISTD 346 Interorganizational Relationships 3 cr
      PSYC 307 Cross-Cultural Psychology 3 cr
      PSYC 330 Interviewing 3 cr
      SOCA 304 Skill Development in Leadership 3 cr
      SOCA 306 Research in Community Needs 3 cr
      SOCA 326 Social Gerontology 3 cr
      SOCA 372 Technology and Society 3 cr
      SOCA 373 Formal Organization 3 cr
           
      Communication  
      COMM 285 Introduction to Conflict Analysis and Resolution 3 cr
      COMM 303 Organizational Communication 3 cr
      COMM 365 Intercultural Communication 3 cr
      COMM 385 Conflict Mediation 3 cr
      ENGL 204 Writing for Business and Industry 3 cr
      ISTD 492 Practicum in Leadership 3 cr
    4. Senior Seminar Project (3 credits)
      LBST 498 Senior Seminar Project 3 cr
  2. Requirements for the Liberal Studies with Cinema and Film Studies Concentration (48 credits)
    The cinema and film studies concentration is an interdisciplinary degree option focusing on the aesthetics, history, and social impact of this visual and narrative art form. Students choosing the cinema and film studies concentration will choose foundational courses at the introductory level on literary, visual and performing arts, and humanistic scholarship. In their core and upper-level elective courses, students will explore the history of film, the intersection of film and the other arts, and may gain experience in use of video and digital editing equipment or in related visual arts media. Students at all levels will have the opportunity to explore film from various disciplinary perspectives by choosing approved courses from several different departments. The Senior Seminar Project (LBST 498) is a capstone experience, which will allow students to develop a film- elated creative project or critical essay to address the liberal studies competencies; this class is taken along with graduating seniors in other liberal studies concentrations.

    1. Foundational Courses (15 credits)
      Choose from at least two different departments:
      ART 104  Introduction to Digital Art 3 cr
      ART 122 Introduction to Drawing 3 cr
      ART 125 Survey of World Art 3 cr
      ART 126 Modern and Contemporary Art: 1900 to Present* 3 cr
      COMM 108 Media and Society 3 cr
      ENGL 167 Introduction to Literature 3 cr
      ENGL 266 Literary Analysis 3 cr
      HUMA 101 Introduction to Humanities: World Cultures to 1500 3 cr
      HUMA 102 Introduction to Humanities: World Cultures 1500 to Present 3 cr
      PHIL 213 Aesthetics 3 cr
      THEA 124 Basic Acting 3 cr
      THEA/WGSS 215 LGBTQ Representation on Stage and Screen 3 cr
    2. Core Courses (15 credits)
      Required Courses (9 credits):  
      HUMA 252 Introduction to Film 3 cr
      ENGL 258 History of Film to 1950 3 cr
      ENGL 259 History of Film from 1950 3 cr
      Elective Courses (6 credits):
      Choose 200-level courses from the following departments: art, communication, modern languages and/or theatre arts. Students cannot use 200-level courses to fulfil this core requirement if they are counting toward the foundational courses.

      200-level special topics courses may substitute for one of the required core courses (up to 3 credits) if they have substantial film component and are approved in advance by the cinema and film studies adviser. Some departments that offer film- elated special topics courses are:
       
      ART 290 Selected Topics in Art
      ENGL 290 Special Topics in English
      LBST 290 Special Topics in Liberal Studies
      PHIL 290 Special Topics in Philosophy
      POLS 290 Special Topics in Political Science
      WGSS 290 Special Topics in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies

      At this stage, students pay close attention to prerequisites for 300-400 level work students may be considering in any of these disciplines.  ART 104, for example, is a prerequisite for ART 364.

    3. Elective Courses (15 credits)
      Choose five 300-400 level courses in at least two departments in consultation with major adviser:
       
      ART 364 Digital Video 3 cr
      ENGL 358 Film Genres* 3 cr
      ENGL 458 Studies in Film* 3 cr
      COMM 350 Digital Storytelling 3 cr
      COMM 360 Contemporary Media Industries 3 cr
      COMM 463 Gender, Race, Class, and Sexualities in Media 3 cr
      THEA 345 Playwriting I 3 cr
      THEA 355 Theatre History and Literature to 1660 3 cr
      THEA 356 Theatre History and Literature from 1660 to 1915 3 cr
      THEA 357 Theatre History and Literature from 1915 to Today 3 cr
      *Courses may be repeated for credit with a different topic.

      Other 300-400 level courses may be used if they have substantial film component and are approved in advance by the cinema and film studies advise.

    4. Senior Seminar Project (3 credits)
      LBST 498 Senior Seminar Project 3 cr
  3. Requirements for the Liberal Studies with Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Concentration (30 credits)
    1. Introductory Courses (6 credits)
      WGSS 110 Introduction to Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 3 cr
      One course in Feminist Theories 3 cr
      (Appropriate classes offered in English, history, philosophy, communication, psychology, etc., with approval of program director.)
    2. Concentration Courses (9 credits)
      Choose from at least two of the following three areas:
       
      Humanities and Art  
      COMM 315 Communication and Gender 3 cr
      COMM 463 Gender, Race, Class, and Sexualities in Media 3 cr
      ENGL 417 Studies in British Literature: British Women Novelists Topic 3 cr
      ENGL 464 Studies in Cultural Trends: Gay and Lesbian Literature Topic 3 cr
      ENGL 469 Women as Writers and Characters 3 cr
      PHIL 290 Special Topics in Philosophy: Feminism in Philosophy Topic 3 cr
      THEA/ WGSS 215 LGBTQ Representation on Stage and Screen 3 cr
      WGSS 112 Women in Literature 3 cr
           
      Social Sciences  
      CRMJ 366 Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice 3 cr
      HIST 236 Women in Modern Society 3 cr
      MGT 446 Global Management 3 cr
      POLS 203 Women, Power, and Politics 3 cr
      PSYC 280/380 Psychology of Gender 3 cr
      SOCA 213 Gender and Society 3 cr
      SOCA 290 Special Topics: LGBTQ Studies Topic 3 cr
           
      Natural Sciences  
      BIOS 103 Human Biology 3 cr
      HESM 285 Sport in Society 3 cr
      HESM 321 Women’s Health Issues 3 cr
      SOCA 379 Society and Environment 3 cr
      WGSS 250 Women in Science 3 cr
    3. Elective Courses (12 credits)
      Select approved courses with adviser.

    4. Senior Seminar Project (3 credits)
      LBST 498 Senior Seminar Project 3 cr

Requirements for the Leadership Certificate (12 credits)

The leadership certificate provides a curriculum that combines conceptual and theoretical frameworks with opportunities to apply those concepts and theories in real-world situations. Students who complete the certificate program will have an enhanced understanding of the personal qualities, interpersonal dynamics, and social patterns that influence leadership efforts. They will also have the opportunity to hone specific leadership skills such as self-assessment and public speaking; identify and assess resources; work in diverse settings; and evaluate and reflect on students’ own leadership styles. Pursuing the leadership certificate is also an excellent opportunity for civic engagement.

  1. Required Courses (6 credits)
    ISTD 200 Introduction to Leadership 3 cr
    ISTD 492 Practicum in Leadership 3 cr
  2. Elective Courses (6 credits)
    Choose two courses:  
    ISTD 300 Human Resource Issues 3 cr
    COMM 285 Introduction to Conflict Analysis and Resolution 3 cr
    SOCA 304 Skill Development in Leadership 3 cr
    SOCA 306 Research in Community Needs 3 cr

Courses in Humanities (HUMA)

101 Introduction to Humanities: World Cultures to 1500 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
A thematic and comparative approach to the history of world cultures, focusing on the West, but including significant material from a variety of non-Western cultures, with particular emphasis on political movements, literature, fine arts, religion, and philosophy from prehistory to 1500.

     
102  Introduction to Humanities: World Cultures 1500 to Present 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Spring.
Offers thematic and comparative approach to the history of world cultures, focusing on the West, but including significant material from a variety of non-Western cultures, with particular emphasis on political movements, literature, fine arts, religion, and philosophy from 1500 to present.

     
103 Diversity in the United States 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Offers thematic and comparative approach to the history and culture of the United States, focusing on one or more of the diverse groups that comprise that culture.

     
200 Humanistic Studies 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C- or better or the consent of instructor.  Freq: Occasionally.
Introduces to philosophies, methods, and issues in the humanities.

     
252 Introduction to Film 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Investigates the distinctive elements and techniques of film as art and the relationship of film to society. Cross-listed with ENGL 252.

     
341 Aesthetic Values 3 cr
 

Prereq:  HUMA 200 or consent of instructor.  Freq:  Occasionally.
Explores the nature of aesthetic judgments and their justification in aesthetic discourse, and the nature and role of art in human life, focusing in particular on the visual arts and music.

     
342 Ethical Values 3 cr
 

Prereq: HUMA 200 or consent of the instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Exploration of the nature of ethical judgments and their justification in ethical discourse, and the role of ethical values in the human pursuit of the good.

     
343 Knowledge and Understanding 3 cr
 

Prereq: HUMA 200 or consent of the instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Exploration of the place of knowledge in human life, the ways in which knowledge is hindered and acquired, and the way in which cultural norms and knowledge interact.

     
396 Humanities Colloquium 1 cr
 

Prereq: None.  Freq: Occasionally.
In-depth approach to a single experience such as attending a play, visiting a museum, or reading a novel. Significant course project will be required. May be repeated for credit with different topic. May require a course fee.

     
468 Holocaust Studies 3 cr
 

Prereq: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Intensive study of various aspects of the Holocaust, such as literature of the Holocaust, film and the Holocaust, and literature of the Second Generation, etc. Cross listed with ENGL 468/HIST 468.

     

Courses in Interdisciplinary Studies (ISTD)

200 Introduction to Leadership 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Introduces principles of leadership from an interdisciplinary theoretical perspective. Provides the opportunity to practice some of those principles. Also introduces skills, such as self-assessment, communication strategies, understanding group dynamics and working in coalitions, setting goals while remaining flexible, and managing conflict.

     
250 Consumer Statistics 3 cr
 

Prereq: Math through high school algebra. Freq: Occasionally.
Consumer statistics is an overview course.  It covers a variety of numerical   analysis   applications   while   avoiding   using   words   like numerical analysis. This course is intended to help students become knowledgeable consumers of statistical reports, not producers.

     
300 Human Resource Issues 3 cr
 

Prereq: SOCA 100 or 101 or consent of instructor.  Freq: Fall.
Identifies a theoretical model of human resource management and explores diverse issues in the workplace, such as external staffing; training and development of employees; compensation; labor relations, including federal and state employment law; and employee security, health and safety.

     
307 Project Planning 3 cr
 

Prereq: ISTD 200. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines the processes involved in initiating, planning, executing, controlling and closing projects. Students obtain skills in leadership, team building, coaching, planning, performance appraisal and staff management with the focus on achieving project goals. Students learn how to design organizational and communication structures that best use the resources available.

     
308 Project Time and Cost Management 3 cr
 

Prereq: ISTD 200, 307.  Freq: Occasionally.
Explores project scope, time, cost, quality and risk management along with the concepts of earned value, variance analysis and resource constraints. Develops skills necessary to bring projects in on time and within budget.

     
345 Organization Theories 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Introduces theories of large-scale, complex organizations that have their origins in a variety of fields and disciplines including sociology, public administration, educational administration and business administration. Applies theories to the analysis of organizations including private businesses, government agencies, not-for-profit service organizations, hospitals, religious organizations, prisons, the military and schools.

     
346 Interorganizational Relationships 3 cr
 

Prereq: None.  Freq: Spring.
Emphasizes social and cultural context in which organizations exist and function and the ways in which that context leads to changes in the structure of organizations.  Investigates conditions under which organizations are created, grow, establish relations with their environments, develop strategies for survival.

     
367 Latinos(as) and the Law 3 cr
 

Prereq:  CRMJ 101 or POLS 100 or consent of instructor. Freq:  Occasionally.
Introduces and examines experiences Latinos(as) encounter with and within the U.S. criminal justice system, as well as related international and transnational issues. A range of theoretical frameworks will be utilized, including socio-ecological, political, and psychological. Cross- listed with CRMJ 367/POLS 367

     
492 Practicum in Leadership 3 cr
 

Prereq: ISTD 200 and two other leadership courses or consent of instructor. Freq: Spring.
Supports students as they complete the capstone project for the leadership certificate.

     

Courses in Liberal Studies (LBST)

100 Introduction to the Disciplines: Humanities and the Arts 3 cr
 

Prereq: Freshman or sophomore standing.  Freq: Occasionally.
Explores the nature, history, overarching questions and notable figures in the Humanities and the Arts such as: art, communication, English, ethnic studies, liberal studies, modern languages, music, theatre, public speaking and women’s, gender and sexuality studies. Topics include an explanation of the UW-P General Education Program and may include information about academic success issues.

     
108 Prior Learning Assessment Portfolio Development 3 cr
 

Prereq:  Consent of program director.  Freq:  Fall, Spring, Summer.
Provides guidance for portfolio development to obtain credit for prior learning. Students will gain an overview of adult learning and distance education.  Students learn to select, categorize, evaluate, and document achievements and accomplishments for review and assessment related to educational goals, academic placement, and the awarding of college credit. Offered through the Council for Adult and Experiential Leaning (CAEL) or by the department.

     
168 Student Leadership 3 cr
 

Prereq:  Acceptance to office of admissions and new student services orientation program. Instructor consent. Freq:  Spring.
Provides practical opportunities to learn and grow in preparation of your employment with the office of admissions and new student services.

     
290 Special Topics in Liberal Studies 1-3 cr
 

Prereq:  Consent of instructor.  Freq: Occasionally.
Special topics in liberal studies will be examined.  May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
297 Crossroads in Liberal Studies and Leadership 3 cr
 

Prereq:  Consent of instructor and a UW-Parkside grade point average of 2.000 minimum.  Freq: Fall, Spring.
Emphasizes critical reflection on courses and other experiences comprising the A.A. in Liberal Studies and Leadership. Students will plan future education and career goals and develop strategies for accomplishing these goals.

     
298 Crossroads in Professional Studies 3 cr
 

Prereq:  Consent of instructor and a UW-Parkside grade point average of 2.000 minimum.  Freq: Fall, Spring.
Emphasizes critical reflection on courses and other experiences comprising the A.A. in Professional Studies. Students will plan future education and career goals and develop strategies for accomplishing these goals.

     
309 Gender, Marriage and Family in Chinese Society 3 cr
 

Prereq:  Consent of instructor.  Freq: Occasionally.
Examines various aspects of gender, marriage and family life in Chinese societies (Mainland China, Taiwan, and Chinese-American communities in the United States). Topics include gender roles, Sexuality, mate selection, marriage, family process, parenthood, family structure, elderly care, divorce and remarriage, and changing family systems. Cultural comparison will be emphasized.

     
390 Special Topics in Liberal Studies 1-3 cr
 

Prereq:  Consent of instructor.  Freq:  Occasionally.
Special topics in liberal studies will be examined.  May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
490 Special Topics in Liberal Studies 1-3 cr
 

Prereq: Junior standing or consent of instructor.  Freq: Occasionally.
Examines special topics in liberal studies. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
494 Internship in Liberal Studies 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: Liberal studies major, junior standing, and consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring
Directed field experience, focusing on application of scholarly concepts to the workplace. Specific arrangements to be made in consultation with adviser.  Maximum of 4 credits may be applied to the major.

     
498 Senior Seminar Project  3 cr
 

Prereq:  Liberal studies major, senior standing, and consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Enables students to apply the knowledge and competencies of Liberal Studies to a senior project.

     
499 Independent Study 1-3 cr
 

Prereq:  Liberal studies major, junior standing, and consent of instructor. Freq:  Fall, Spring, Summer.
Individual study of selected topics in Liberal Studies.

     

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