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Politics, Philosophy, and Law


UW-PARKSIDE 2017-19 CATALOG

Greenquist 318 • 262-595-2177

College:
Social Sciences and Professional Studies

Degree and Programs Offered:
Bachelor of Arts

Majors - Political Science, Philosophy

Minors - Legal Studies, Philosophy, Philosophy of Natural Science, Political Science, Political Science for Teachers, Public Policy Studies, World Politics

Certificate – Ethics

Major Concentrations - Law

Professional Accreditations or Memberships:
American Political Science Association; American Philosophical Association, Philosophy of Science Association

Student Organizations/Clubs:
Mock Trial, Prelaw Society; Parkside Philosophical Society, Phi Sigma Tau

Career Possibilities:
For information about graduate school, law school or careers in political science, visit the department’s website at www.uwp.edu.

Because of its emphasis on critical thinking and conceptual analysis, philosophy provides excellent preparation for a wide variety of professional studies and careers. UW-Parkside philosophy graduates have pursued many vocational interests in the past, from graduate school in philosophy and other fields in the humanities and social sciences, to law, librarianship, medical school, and business.

Department Overview

Although both continue to operate as separate academic programs, in 2012 the department of political science and law and the department of philosophy merged to form the department of politics, philosophy, and law. The program in political science provides many educational opportunities for the undergraduate student, with particular strengths in comparative politics, international relations, and legal studies. A unique feature of the department is the internship program, which permits students to earn academic credit while directly experiencing government, politics, public administration and law. The program in philosophy offers its majors and minors a variety of courses in traditional areas of philosophical inquiry while providing a broad range of general education courses and courses bearing on other disciplines. Philosophy and political science have collaborated in various ways for some time, in particular with cross-listed courses contributing to each other’s programs.

The merging of the two departments provides a unique opportunity for  our  faculty  and  for  our  students.  While  philosophy  is  the rational investigation of truths about reality, knowledge and values essential to understanding the place of human beings in the world and the nature of the good life, political science is the systematic study of political systems, behaviors, and processes, as well as the systems of thought which underlie political structures. Both political science and law and philosophy include within their scope the study of logic and scientific method, as well as the investigation of ethical and political values.  Thus they often provide reflective insight for other fields of study.   In the future, the department’s intent is to more fully integrate the two academic programs in order to take full advantage of the possibilities for creative course offerings which will benefit students’ intellectual growth.

Preparation for Graduate School

The undergraduate major in political science can help prepare an individual for graduate study in law, public administration, the policy sciences, political science, or criminal justice. Internships, independent study, and off-campus programs for credit course work in political science provide an opening to the ideas and tools used in the field. Through internships with politicians and public officials, such as the district attorney and social service agencies, these tools and ideas may be used and evaluated in practice. The credit-bearing internship offers  an  excellent  opportunity for exploring employment possibilities while supplementing academic training. Independent-study projects are strongly encouraged for political science students who wish to acquire the ability to do research and to explore their own interests. Off-campus programs provide a third possibility for professional development outside of regular course work. Programs  in New York with the United Nations and in Washington with the federal government are available, as are other individualized arrangements.

Completing the major in philosophy will prepare students for entrance into graduate school in the field, but those interested in this option should endeavor to take as many upper level courses as they can in as many areas as possible, including especially the history of philosophy. Graduates in philosophy have also pursued graduate study in psychology, art history, library science, business (M.B.A.) and law.

Cross-listed Courses between Political Science and Law and Philosophy

POLS 207/PHIL 207       Classical Political Philosophy
POLS 221/PHIL 220       Politics, Law, and Society
POLS 304/PHIL 304       Theories of International Relations
POLS 306/PHIL 306       Modern Political Philosophy
POLS 307/PHIL 307       Contemporary Political Thought

Program Level Outcomes for Political Science

  1. We seek to help our students attain a practical and theoretical knowledge of politics and the law, assisting them to become conversant in a broad-range of concepts in the areas of political theory, international politics, comparative politics, American government, and the law.
  2. We seek to help our students to become critical thinkers; thinkers that are able to question the assumptions that underwrite claims or positions and make reasoned determinations about the truth and strength of various arguments.
  3. We seek to help our students to become independent researchers, capable of identifying and articulating hypotheses, seeking information and inputs relevant to the topic, evaluating the credibility of sources and information, applying the appropriate methods and tools for testing or exploring a hypothesis, and drawing proper conclusions based on their findings
  4. We seek to help our students become global citizens in the sense that they have civically-oriented consciousness, a respect for diversity, pluralism and inclusiveness, and a moral and ethical sense of responsibility and moral disposition regarding their place in local, state, national, and international communities.

Requirements for Admission to the Political Science Major and to the Major with a Concentration in Law

  1. A student must be in good academic standing at the time of declaring the major.
  2. At least two courses in political science in courses numbered 100 through 105 with a grade of C or better in each course.  (C-minus does not count.)

Requirements for the Political Science Major (34 credits)

This department offers the two major options: the traditional major in political science and the  major  in  political  science with a concentration in law. Students need to complete the requirements for one of these options. For example, a student choosing to major in political science with a concentration in law needs to meet the requirements listed under the concentration in law. The major in political science consists of a minimum of 34 credits. Students must complete a minimum of 15 credits at UW-Parkside in their major in courses numbered 300 or above in addition to POLS 445 Senior Seminar in Political Science.

  1. Introductory Courses (9 credits)
    Choose three courses:  
    POLS 100 American Politics 3 cr
    POLS 103 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 cr
    POLS 104 Introduction to International Relations 3 cr
    POLS 105 Introduction to Politics 3 cr
    POLS 202 Public Policy 3 cr
  2. Required Research Course (4 credits)
    POLS 200 Research Methods and Sources 4 cr

    This course is required even if another research methods course has been taken.

  3. Advanced Courses (9 credits)
    Choose three courses (one course from three different groups):
    1. American Politics:
      POLS 116 Introduction to Law 3 cr
      POLS 214 Executive and Legislative Politics 3 cr
      POLS 360 Political Parties and Interest Groups 3 cr
      POLS 375 Elections and Political Participation 3 cr
      POLS 395 Voting Behavior and Political Participation 3 cr
    2. World Politics:
      POLS 224 American Foreign Policy 3 cr
      POLS 304 Theories of International Relations 3 cr
      POLS 330 European Politics 3 cr
      POLS 331 The Politics of Developing Nations 3 cr
      POLS 332 Socialist Thought and Practice 3 cr
      POLS 334 Resistance 3 cr
      POLS 335 Popular Music, Human Rights and Democratization 3 cr
      POLS 340 The Latin American Left 3 cr
      POLS 341 International Conflict and Cooperation 3 cr
      POLS 415 International Law 3 cr
    3. Political Theory:
      POLS 207 Classical Political Philosophy 3 cr
      POLS 303 Science Fiction and Politics 3 cr
      POLS 304 Theories of International Relations 3 cr
      POLS 306 Modern Political Philosophy 3 cr
      POLS 307 Contemporary Political Thought 3 cr
      POLS 332 Socialist Thought and Practice 3 cr
      POLS 334 Resistance 3 cr
    4. Public Policy:
      POLS 217 Tactical Decision Making 3 cr
      POLS 302 Environmental Policy 3 cr
      POLS 312 Introduction to Global Warming Policy and Governance 3 cr
      POLS 316 Diversity Law: African Americans 3 cr
      POLS 317 Strategic Decision Making 3 cr

      Note: Students may count POLS 304, 332 and 334 for world politics or political theory, not for both.

  4. Additional Upper Level Courses (9 credits)
    Choose at least three additional courses numbered 300 or above:

    The political science internship (POLS 494) and independent study (POLS 490) are recommended options but are not required.
    No more than 6 credits of internship and 3 credits of independent study can be counted toward meeting the credit-hour requirements for the major.
    Independent study credits do not count toward meeting the 15 upper level credit-hour requirement for the major.
    Only 3 credits of internship credit can be used to meet the 15 upper level credit-hour requirement for the major.

  5. Required Senior Seminar (3 credits)
    POLS 445 Senior Seminar in Political Science 3 cr

Requirements for the Political Science Major with a Concentration in Law (33-34 credits)

This department offers a concentration in law for political science majors interested in pursuing a career in law or legal studies (practicing law, teaching law, court  administration, and government agencies). The concentration in law brings together the most significant  perspectives  and  tools  required for a thorough preparation in law and legal studies, grounded in democratic theory and practice.

Students must complete a minimum of 15 credits at UW- Parkside in their major in courses numbered 300 or above. This concentration requires a minimum of 33 credits. These credits are distributed as follows:

  1. Required Courses (21-22 credits)
    POLS 100 American Politics 3 cr
         
    POLS 200 Research Methods and Sources 4 cr
    OR    
    PHIL 275 Techniques of Philosophical Research 3 cr
         
    POLS 116 Introduction to Law 3 cr
    POLS 202 Public Policy  3 cr
    POLS 310 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties 3 cr
    POLS 320 Constitutional Law: The Structure and Power of U.S. Government 3 cr
    POLS 445 Senior Seminar in Political Science 3 cr
  2. Introductory Course (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    POLS 103 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 cr
    POLS 104 Introduction to International Relations 3 cr
    POLS 105 Introduction to Politics 3 cr
  3. Upper Level Electives (9 credits)
    Choose three courses (minimum of one POLS):  
    BUS 372  Business Law 3 cr
    COMM 485 Practicum in Conflict Intervention 3 cr
    CRMJ 325 Restorative Justice 3 cr
    CRMJ 364  Capital Punishment 3 cr
    CRMJ 380 Criminal Law 3 cr
    HESM 300 Legal Issues in Sport and Fitness Management 3 cr
    HESM 310 Sports Industry Regulation 3 cr
    POLS 302 Environmental Policy 3 cr
    POLS 312 Introduction to Global Warming Policy and Governance 3 cr
    POLS 316 Diversity Law: African Americans 3 cr
    POLS 494 Internship** 3 cr
    POLS 415 International Law  3 cr
    SOCA 359 Law and Society 3 cr
  4. Strongly Recommended
    PHIL 201 Logic 3 cr

    **A maximum of 3 credits of internship can be applied to the 9 credits required in this category.
    Note: Courses in other departments may have course or departmental prerequisites.

Requirements for Graduating with a Political Science Major

All students must complete their degree program within 10 years of declaring a major or minor in political science, or the concentration in law, or completing their first course in political science, whichever is earlier. Credits earned at UW-Parkside or at any other institution that are more than 10 years old cannot be used to complete any major, minor or concentration offered by this department. A student who has been inactive for three or more years must reapply for admission to the major. The department reserves the right to require additional credits or course work.

Requirements for the Legal Studies Minor (18 Credits)

  1. Required Courses (9 credits)
    POLS 116 Introduction to Law 3 cr
    POLS 202 Public Policy 3 cr
         
    Choose one course:  
    POLS 310 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties 3 cr
    POLS 320 Constitutional Law: The Structure and Power of U.S. Government 3 cr
  2. Elective POLS Courses (6 credits)
    Choose two courses:  
    POLS 221 Politics, Law and Society 3 cr
    POLS 310 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties 3 cr
    POLS 316 Diversity Law: African Americans 3 cr
    POLS 320 Constitutional Law: The Structure and Power of U.S. Government 3 cr
    POLS 415 International Law 3 cr
    POLS 445 Senior Seminar in Political Science 3 cr
    POLS 490 Special Topics in Political Science
    (with permission of legal studies adviser)
    3 cr
  3. Elective Course (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    BUS 372  Business Law 3 cr
    CRMJ 316 Criminal Procedure 3 cr
    CRMJ 325 Restorative Justice 3 cr
    SOCA 359 Law and Society 3 cr

Requirements for the Political Science for Teachers Minor (19 credits)

  1. Required Courses (13 credits)
    POLS 100 American Politics 3 cr
    POLS 105 Introduction to Politics 3 cr
    POLS 200 Research Methods and Sources 4 cr
    POLS 335 Popular Music, Human Rights and Democratization 3 cr
  2. Elective Courses (6 credits)
    Choose one (3 credits):  
    POLS 214 Executive and Legislative Politics 3 cr
    POLS 221 Politics, Law and Society 3 cr
         
    Choose one (3 credits):  
    POLS 306 Modern Political Philosophy 3 cr
    POLS 307 Contemporary Political Thought 3 cr

Requirements for the Public Policy Studies Minor (15 credits)

  1. Required Courses (9 credits)
    POLS 202  Public Policy 3 cr
    POLS 203 Women, Power and Politics 3 cr
    POLS 312 Introduction to Global Warming Policy and Governance 3 cr
  2. Public Policy Courses (6 credits)
    Choose any two relevant public policy POLS 490 special topics courses (for a total of 6 credits).

    Note:   POLS 200 Research Methods and Sources, is not required for any minor in the department.  However, certain advanced courses have POLS 200 as a prerequisite. If you have not taken POLS 200, check with the instructor of a course to see if it is a course prerequisite.

Requirements for the Student-Designed Political Science Minor (18 credits)

  1. Choose two POLS 100-level courses (6 credits)
  2. Choose one POLS 200-level course (3 credits)
  3. Choose three POLS 300-level courses (9 credits)

Requirements for the World Politics Minor (18 credits)

  1. Required Courses (9 credits)
    POLS 103 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 cr
    POLS 104  Introduction to International Relations 3 cr
    POLS 304 Theories of International Relations 3 cr
  2. World Politics Elective Courses (9 credits)
    Choose three courses:  
    POLS 224 American Foreign Policy 3 cr
    POLS 304 Theories of International Relations 3 cr
    POLS 330 European Politics 3 cr
    POLS 331 The Politics of Developing Nations 3 cr
    POLS 332 Socialist Thought and Practice 3 cr
    POLS 334 Resistance 3 cr
    POLS 335 Popular Music, Human Rights and Democratization 3 cr
    POLS 415 International Law 3 cr
    PHIL 340 Bioethics 3 cr
    PHIL 341 Business Ethics  3 cr

Program Level Outcomes for Philosophy

  1. Knowledge and Understanding: Majors will gain a familiarity with several important philosophical ideas and philosophers.
  2. Skills: majors will learn to think logically and creatively, to critically analyze key texts and arguments and to effectively communicate their ideas.
  3. Values: majors will engage in fair and reasoned discourse.

Philosophy Honors

To be eligible for a B.A. with honors in Philosophy, a philosophy major must attain a GPA of 3.5 or better in all philosophy courses taken. In addition, an overall GPA of 3.00 must be attained. Students who are required to take English 100 should not enroll in a philosophy course until they have satisfactorily completed English 100.

Requirements for the Philosophy Major (36 credits)

The major in philosophy consists of a minimum of 36 credits in philosophy courses. The following requirements apply to all majors:

  • At least 15 credits of upper-level courses in the major must be completed at UW-Parkside. PHIL 499 Independent Study does not count toward these 15 credits.
  • A total of no more than 6 credits of PHIL 499 Independent Study, will count toward the major
  • A grade of C-minus or higher is required in any course to be counted toward the major.
  • A 2.50 or better GPA in courses counting toward the major is required. Not all philosophy courses taken need be counted toward the major.
  1. Required Courses (12 credits)
    PHIL 201 Logic 3 cr
    PHIL 260/360 History of Philosophy: Ancient 3 cr
    PHIL 261/361 History of Philosophy: Early Modern 3 cr
    PHIL 275 Techniques of Philosophical Research 3 cr
  2. Elective Courses (12 credits)
    All majors are required to complete two courses (with one at the 300 level) in two of the following three areas (12 credits):
    (1) Ethics, Value Theory, and Social and Political thought; (2) Metaphysics and Philosophy of Mind; and (3) Epistemology and the Philosophy of Science. No course may be used to cover two areas at once. This requirement is a total of four courses with a minimum of two at the 300 level. The department will sometimes assign courses to different areas depending on their topics, and majors will be informed of such assignments in advance.

    1. Ethics, Value Theory and Political Thought
      PHIL 206 Introduction to Ethics 3 cr
      PHIL 207 Classical Political Philosophy 3 cr
      PHIL 213 Aesthetics 3 cr
      PHIL 215 Contemporary Moral Problems 3 cr
      PHIL 220 Politics, Law, and Society 3 cr
      PHIL 306 Modern Political Philosophy 3 cr
      PHIL 307 Contemporary Political Thought 3 cr
      PHIL 320 Value Theory 3 cr
      PHIL 328 Ethics in the Criminal Justice System 3 cr
      PHIL 340 Bioethics 3 cr
      PHIL 341 Business Ethics 3 cr
    2. Metaphysics and Philosophy of Mind
      PHIL 204 Reason and Reality 3 cr
      PHIL 205 Philosophy of Religion 3 cr
      PHIL 255 Topics in Continental Thought 3 cr
      PHIL 305 Philosophical Analysis
      (depending on the topic)
      3 cr
      PHIL 315 Metaphysics 3 cr
      PHIL 355 Topics in Continental Thought 3 cr
    3. Epistemology and Philosophy of Science
      GSCI 102 Science and Pseudoscience 3 cr
      PHIL 203 Truth, Knowledge, and Belief 3 cr
      MATH/PHIL 303 Set Theory, Logic, and Proof 4 cr
      PHIL 305 Philosophical Analysis
      (depending on the topic)
      3 cr
      PHIL 310 Philosophy of Science 3 cr
  3. Additional Elective Courses (12 credits)
    Choose 12 additional credits of PHIL courses.

Requirements for the Philosophy Minor (18 credits)

  • A minimum of 9 upper-level credits must be taken at UW- Parkside.
  • A grade of C-minus or higher is required in any course to be counted toward the minor.
  • A 2.50 or better GPA in courses counting toward the minor is required.
  1. Choose three PHIL 300-or 400-level courses (9 credits)
  2. Choose two PHIL 200-level or above courses (6 credits)
  3. Choose one PHIL course at any level (3 credits)

Requirements for the Philosophy of Natural Science Minor (18 credits)

The minor in philosophy of natural science is open to students majoring in biological sciences, geology, mathematics, computer science, and physics and to others by consent of the chair of the Philosophy Department.

  1. Required Courses (9 credits)
    GSCI 102 Science and Pseudoscience 3 cr
    PHIL 201 Logic 3 cr
    PHIL 310 Philosophy of Science 3 cr
  2. Elective Courses (9 credits)
    Choose three courses:  
    MATH 373 History of Mathematics 3 cr
    PHIL 102 Great Thinkers 3 cr
    PHIL 203 Truth, Knowledge and Belief 3 cr
    PHIL 204 Reason and Reality 3 cr
    MATH/PHIL 303 Set Theory, Logic and Proof 4 cr
    PHIL 310 Philosophy of Science
    (may repeat with different topic)
    3 cr

    Other courses will be accepted as electives from time to time as suitable.

Requirements for the Ethics Certificate (12 credits)

  1. Required Courses (6 credits)
    PHIL 206 Introduction to Ethics 3 cr
    PHIL 215 Contemporary Moral Problems 3 cr
  2. Elective Courses (6 credits)
    PHIL 320 Value Theory 3 cr
    PHIL 328 Ethics in the Criminal Justice System 3 cr
    PHIL 340 Bioethics 3 cr
    PHIL 341 Business Ethics 3 cr
    POLS 349 Global Ethics 3 cr
    HESM 282 Ethics and Issues in Sport Management 3 cr

Teacher Education Licensure in Political Science

Students interested in becoming teachers will need to complete an approved program pathway to a Wisconsin initial educator license. The approved pathway to this license is a structured collaboration between the political science department and the Institute of Professional Educator Development (IPED).

The requirements for teacher licensure are specific and therefore students must meet with the IPED Adviser to coordinate the major and teacher education curriculum. It is very important to contact the IPED adviser at 262-595-2180 or Molinaro D111 as soon as possible. Students are required to seek advising each semester from both the IPED Adviser and the political science department liaison to the teacher education program.

Complete information about the Teacher Education Program can be found on the IPED website at: http://www.uwp.edu/learn/departments/educatordevelopment/index.cfm

Courses in Political Science (POLS)

100 American Politics 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Examines institutions, processes and dynamics of the American governmental system emphasizing problems of policy-making in a pluralistic democratic system.

     
103 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Explores questions such as why some developed democracies have extensive welfare states and the differences between prime ministers and presidents through qualitative and quantitative analysis.

     
104 Introduction to International Relations 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Conceptual and theoretical tools for interpreting world politics and navigating the international system. Basic foreign policy analysis, key actors in the international system and a special focus on the United Nations, European Union, International Monetary Fund, and World Bank.

     
105  Introduction to Politics 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Provides a general introduction to politics, including basic concepts such as power, authority, legitimacy, types of political systems, approaches to the study of politics, and challenges common to all political systems.

     
116 Introduction to Law 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Utilizing the case approach, students will analyze the structure of the legal system and the process of judicial decision making. Students will also be introduced to substantive areas of common law.

     
200 Research Methods and Sources 4 cr
 

Prereq: Completion of POLS introductory sequence. Freq: Yearly.
Methods, philosophy, and sources of political science research. Required for the major in political science and for the concentration in legal studies.

     
202 Public Policy 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 100. Freq: Occasionally.
Explores the processes, problems, methods and issues involved in the formulation of public policies. Emphasis on policy formation at the national, state, and local levels. Case studies employed.

     
203 Women, Power and Politics 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines the environmental, systematic, and political variables that define the existing and potential political position of women in a variety of international cultures. Cross-listed with WGSS 203.

     
207 Classical Political Philosophy 3 cr
 

Prereq: One of the following: POLS 105, PHIL 101, HIST 118. Freq: Occasionally.
The works of classical Greek political philosophers Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Cross-listed with PHIL 207.

     
214 Executive and Legislative Politics 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 100. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines two of the three branches of government; investigates them in isolation and look at their origins, their structural evolution, and the sources of their power.  Explores how their interaction results in policy making at the federal level.

     
217 Tactical Decision Making 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall (even years).
Examines tactical decision making from both a rational and cognitive-bureaucratic perspective.

     
221 Politics, Law and Society 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Studies how law and politics interact with personal and social Identity, including race, gender, and class. Cross-listed with PHIL 220.

     
224 American Foreign Policy 3 cr
 

Prereq: One POLS course or junior standing. Freq: Occasionally.
Formulation and implementation of foreign policy in the United States. Relationship of American foreign policy to its domestic foundations and to the larger international system.

     
231 State and Local Government and Politics 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 100 or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Provides an overview of state and local political institutions, including state   constitutions,   structural   organization,   relationships   between legislative,  executive,  and  judicial  branches,  and  intergovernmental relations at state and local levels. Delves into contentious public policy areas such as safety and environmental regulations, unionization, and economic development planning.

     
290 Special Topics in Political Science 3 cr
 

Prereq: Varies by topic. Freq: Occasionally.
Selected topics in political science will be studied. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

     
302 Environmental Policy 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 100 or ENVS major or minor. Freq: Occasionally.
Surveys the political and social aspects of environmental policy making and how different political decision-making structures respond to various environmental issues.

     
303 Science Fiction and Politics 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 104 or 105.  Freq: Summer.
Exploration of current political and social issues using works of science fiction. Topics include individualism, collectivism, democracy, gender issues, and biopolitics. Various dystopic political futures will be discussed.

     
304 Theories of International Relations 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 104, 200. Freq: Spring.
Contemporary theories of international relations, with selected applications to current issues or relationships in international politics. Emphasis on critical theories in the evaluation and comparison of various theoretical approaches. Cross-listed with PHIL 304.

     
306 Modern Political Philosophy 3 cr
 

Prereq: One of the following: POLS 105, PHIL 101, HIST 119, 120. Freq:  Occasionally.
The works of modern political thinkers such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche. Cross-listed with PHIL 306.

     
307 Contemporary Political Thought 3 cr
 

Prereq: One POLS or PHIL course. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines contemporary philosophical works including themes of the meaning of equality, liberty, autonomy, gender, race and community in contemporary society. Cross-listed with PHIL 307.

     
310 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 100 or 116, or junior standing or consent of instructor. Freq: Yearly.
Examines U.S. Supreme Court cases concerned with the protection of civil liberties. Includes race and equality; sex, marriage, and reproduction; free speech; freedom of religion.

     
312 Introduction to Global Warming Policy and Governance 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS100 or equivalent. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines and evaluates greenhouse gas mitigation and adaptation policies which are being implemented by a variety of national and sub- national governments.

     
316 Diversity Law: African Americans 3 cr
 

Prereq:  POLS 100 or ETHN minor.  POLS 116 recommended. Freq: Occasionally.
Analyzes the relationship of African Americans to the United States Constitution, and includes such topics as -slavery, the Fugitive Slave Acts, the Civil War Amendments, segregation, the civil rights movement, voting rights, affirmative action, and housing laws

     
317 Strategic Decision Making 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 217. Freq: Spring (odd years).
Examines decision making from both a rational and cognitive-bureaucratic perspective. Investigates the universal applications of theoretical strategic thinking, integrate tactical and strategic decision making, and apply creative and critical thinking in strategic formulation and implementation. Explores case studies of military, political and corporate strategies.

     
320 Constitutional Law: The Structure and Power of U.S. Government 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 100 or 116, or junior standing or consent of instructor. Freq: Yearly.
Examines the structure of government established by the Constitution. Topics include the relations between the states and the federal government, the power of Congress to regulate the economy, and the power of the President to conduct war.

     
330 European Politics 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 103 or 104. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines political culture, political institutions, and public choices of European democratic states. Focuses on on the history, institutions, and policies of the European Union.

     
331 The Politics of Developing Nations 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 103 or 104. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines problems of developing political institutions as they cope with and generate processes of, social change,  economic  development, and cultural independence.

     
332 Socialist Thought and Practice 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 103, 104 or 105; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Explores the thought of Marx and his later interpreters, such as Lenin and Bernstein. Discussion of the ideological foundations of and political dynamics of socialist systems. May include discussion of other socialist thinkers.

     
334 Resistance 3 cr
 

Prereq: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Freq: Yearly.
Examines the dissemination of and resistance to power (in a Foucauldian sense) in the global economy/polity. Introduces the concept of modernity and its underside via Hortkheimer, Adorno, and Foucault’s notion of power within modern and post-modern contexts. Extends these notions through the works of Deleuze, Hardt and Negri, and others. Cross-listed with INTS 334.

     
335 Popular Music, Human Rights and Democratization 3 cr
 

Prereq: One class in POLS. Freq: Yearly.
Explores the politics of sounds and songs and the role of popular music in opening up democratic spaces for a viable and vibrant democracy. Examines the theories and practices of human rights and democratization within the nexus of interactions between popular music and social movements. Topics include the Civil Rights Movement, Tropicalismo in Brazil, Nueva Canción in Latin America and Arab Spring music.

     
340 The Latin American Left 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 104.  Freq: Occasionally.
Focuses on the Latin American Left—the environment that spawned it, its historical role in changing Latin American politics, and its role in the present and future political and economic development of the region.

     
341 International Conflict and Cooperation 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 104, 200. Freq: Occasionally.
Cooperation and competition in the anarchic environment of international politics. Selected models of world order investigating integration and fragmentation of nation-states; development and maintenance of international regime structures; and the influence of international/regional organizations.

     
344 African Politics 3 cr
 

Prereq: Sophomore standing. Freq: Yearly.
Investigates African politics and society, stressing the transboundary linkages that exist on the local, national, and global level. Includes common challenges to African countries, such as colonial  history, debt, resource development, and violent conflict. Examines political, economic and cultural strengths of African countries.

     
349 Global Ethics 3 cr
 

Prereq: Sophomore standing. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines current global issues, conditions, and choices in terms of the ethical questions they present. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic.

     
356 Political Sociology 3 cr
 

Prereq: SOCA 101. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines the relationship between politics and the larger social structure, such as structure of power in the United States and the economy; political consciousness and the debate on the changing nature of industrial societies. Cross-listed with SOCA 356.

     
360 Political Parties and Interest Groups 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 100. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines political party development in the United States; structure, functions, and behavior of parties and pressure groups; responsiveness to the electorate and public opinion; and some theories on the role of parties and interest groups in a democracy. Comparative material included.

     
367 Latinos (as) and the Law 3 cr
 

Prereq: CRMJ 101 or POLS 100; or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Introduces and examines experiences Latinos(as) encounter with and within the U.S. criminal justice system, as well as related international and transnational issues. A range of theoretical frameworks will be utilized, including socio-ecological, political, and psychological. Cross- listed with CRMJ 367/ISTD 367.

     
375 Elections and Political Participation 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 100; 200 or concurrent registration. Freq: Occasionally.
Introduces students to some of the major topics of debate and research in political science with regards to voter behavior and political participation in U.S. politics, with a heavy emphasis on federal elections.

     
390 Special Topics 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq:  Occasionally.
Selected topics in political science will be examined. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

     
395 Voting Behavior and Political Participation 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 100, 200 (or concurrent with 200). Freq: Occasionally.
Examines and criticizes competing explanations of voting behavior and political participation in the United States. Features dynamics of citizen involvement in the political process.

     
415 International Law 3 cr
 

Prereq: Senior standing, POLS 104, 200. Freq: Occasionally.
Survey course in the international legal relationships among actors in world politics. Although much of the course is an overview of the legal framework of public international law, various case studies are investigated.

     
416 The International Criminal Court 3 cr
 

Prereq: Junior standing. Freq: Occasionally.
Provides a historical and political  overview  of  the  development  of the international criminal court of the context of the international law. Genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and aggression will be investigated. Highlights specific cases.

     
445 Senior Seminar in Political Science 3 cr
 

Prereq: Senior standing. Freq: Occasionally.
A capstone research experience for majors in their last year. Also serves to assess mastery of the discipline of political science. Required of all political science majors who are not concentrating in legal studies

     
490 Special Topics in Political Science 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 100 or consent of instructor and section prerequisite. Freq: Occasionally.
Select topics in political science will be studied at an advanced level.

     
494  Internship in Political Science 1-12 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 104, 200; consent of instructor and department chair. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Provides opportunities to serve as intern in state, regional, county, or local government offices or in the offices of elected officials.

     
499 Independent Study 1-6 cr
 

Prereq: Consent of Instructor and a Department Chair. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Provides individual instruction on topics related to political science. A maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward the major.

     

Courses in Philosophy (PHIL)

101  Introduction to Philosophy 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Introduces philosophical method and typical philosophical issues, such as the existence of God, life after death, freewill, the nature and sources of knowledge, and the nature of justice.

     
102 Great Thinkers 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
A survey of the history of philosophical thought in the West from its beginnings to the 20th century, emphasizing its social and political context and its relations to the sciences.

     
200 Topics in the History of Philosophy 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Examination in depth of a selected figure, movement, or issue in the history of philosophy. Original sources in translation are studied. May be repeated for credit.

     
201 Logic 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Emphasis on basic skills of critical thinking, in particular the construction and analysis of arguments in everyday life. Formal and informal arguments are investigated.

     
203 Truth, Knowledge and Belief 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Discussion of epistemological topics such as experience and perception, innate knowledge, skepticism and rational belief, and the nature of truth. May be repeated once for credit with different content.

     
204 Reason and Reality 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Metaphysical issues such as free will, cosmology, the nature of reality, space and time, causality, particulars and universals, and humanity’s place and meaning in the universe. May be repeated once for credit with different content.

     
205 Philosophy of Religion 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Introduces major philosophical issues in religion, including the existence of God, the supernatural, the problem of evil, life’s meaning, faith, reason, religious belief, science and morality, and the nature of religious commitment.

     
206 Introduction to Ethics 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Examines the nature of ethics and its relationship to law and religion. Discusses and appraises typical meta-ethical challenges to the possibility of ethics, such as relativism, subjectivism, positivism, naturalism, and egoism. Examines the most important normative ethical systems: virtue ethics, deontology, and utilitarianism, with particular emphasis on the work of Aristotle, Mill, and Kant.

     
207 Classical Political Philosophy 3 cr
 

Prereq: One of the following: POLS 105, PHIL 101, HIST 118. Freq: Occasionally.
The works of the classical Greek political philosophers Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Cross-listed with POLS 207.

     
213 Aesthetics 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Objectivity and criteria of art criticism, the nature of aesthetic experience, and nature of art. May be repeated for credit once under different topics by consent of department chair.

     
215 Contemporary Moral Problems 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Discussion of contemporary moral problems and related theoretical issues, with a focus on issues such as sexual morality, punishment, abortion, racism, sexism, warfare and civil disobedience.

     
220 Politics, Law, and Society 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Studies how law and politics interact with personal and social Identity, including race, gender, and class. Cross-listed with POLS 221.

     
255 Topics in Continental Thought 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Alternate Years.
An introduction to major thinkers and movements of contemporary Continental philosophy, including Existentialism, Phenomenology, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Neo-Marxist Critical Theory, Semiotics, Philosophical Hermeneutics, French Feminism, Post-Structuralism, and  Post-Modernism.

     
260 History of Philosophy: Ancient 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Alternate Years.
An examination of the philosophy of the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, the Skeptics, the Cynics, and the Neo-Platonists. Not open to students with credit in PHIL 360.

     
261 History of Philosophy: Early Modern 3 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Alternate Years.
An examination of the philosophy of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, and their contemporaries. Not open to students with credit in PHIL 361.

     
275 Techniques of Philosophical Research 3 cr
 

Prereq: One PHIL course and concurrently enrolled in a second PHIL course; or POLS 116 or 209 or 310 or 320. PHIL 201 recommended. Freq: Spring (even years).
Examines scholarly research as well as techniques for the development and assessment of philosophical arguments and positions.

     
290 Special Topics in Philosophy 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Selected topics in philosophy will be examined.

     
302 Topics in The History of Philosophy 3 cr
 

Prereq:  One PHIL course or consent of instructor.  Freq:  Alternate Years.
Examination in depth of a  selected  figure,  movement,  or  issue  in the history of philosophy. Original sources in translation are studied. Research paper required. May be repeated for credit.

     
303 Set Theory, Logic and Proof 4 cr
 

Prereq: MATH 222; or PHIL 201 and consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Examines elementary propositional and predicate logic; language and axioms of set theory; operations on sets; well-orderings, ordinals, transfinite induction and recursion; cardinals; the axiom of  choice ; combinatorics; reading and writing of proofs in mathematics. Cross- listed with MATH 303.

     
304 Theories of International Relations 3 cr
 

Prereq: POLS 104, 200. Freq: Spring.
Contemporary theories of international relations with selected applications to current issues of relationships in international politics. Emphasis on critical theories in the evaluation and comparison of various theoretical approaches. Cross-listed with POLS 304.

     
305 Philosophical Analysis 3 cr
 

Prereq: PHIL 201 or 203 or consent of instructor. Freq: Alternate Years.
Topics in epistemology, philosophical logic, philosophy of language, and/or philosophic method. May be repeated once for credit.

     
306 Modern Political Philosophy 3 cr
 

Prereq: One of the following: POLS 105, PHIL 101, HIST 119, 120. Freq: Occasionally.
The works of modern political thinkers such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche. Cross-listed with POLS 306.

     
307 Contemporary Political Thought  3 cr
 

Prereq: One POLS or PHIL course. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines contemporary philosophical works including themes of the meaning of equality, liberty, autonomy, gender, race and community in contemporary society. Cross-listed with POLS 307.

     
310 Philosophy of Science 3 cr
 

Prereq: GSCI 102 or PHIL 201 or consent of instructor. Freq: Alternate Years.
An examination of such topics as the nature of scientific methods and theories; explanation, prediction, confirmation, reduction, the relations among the sciences, culture and values, and science versus pseudoscience. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.

     
315 Metaphysics 3 cr
 

Prereq: PHIL 204 or 205 or consent of instructor. Freq: Yearly.
Topics relating to the fundamental nature of reality and of the human condition (e.g.., freewill, mind/body, the meaning of life, etc.). May be repeated once for credit with different topic.

     
320 Value Theory 3 cr
 

Prereq: PHIL 206 or consent of instructor. Freq: Alternate Years.
Topics in moral theory or political theory or special issues such as relativism, science and morality, liberalism, Marxism, fascism, sexism, and human rights. May be repeated for credit with different content.

     
328 Ethics in the Criminal Justice System 3 cr
 

Prereq: One course in PHIL, CRMJ 101, or consent of instructor. Freq: Alternate Years.
An examination of ethical issues arising in connection with criminal justice in particular, punishment, legal and police ethics, and the justice of institutions associated with criminal justice.

     
331 Philosophy of Popular Culture 3 cr
 

Prereq: Sophomore standing. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Examines topics in popular culture such as the philosophy of film, the philosophy of sex and love, and the philosophy of zombies and vampires.

     
340  Bioethics 3 cr
 

Prereq: Sophomore standing or above. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines moral conflicts that arise in the various fields associated with human biology. Analyze issues that physicians, patients, and policymakers confront in the provision of health care, the pursuit of medical research, and the allocation of finite health resources.

     
341 Business Ethics 3 cr
 

Prereq: Sophomore standing. Freq: Spring.
Examines business from the perspective of ethics and morals. Ethical reasoning guides discussion on topics such as: environmentalism, financial incentives, affirmative action, globalization, conflicts of interest, and whistle-blowing.

     
355 Topics in Continental Thought 3 cr
 

Prereq: One PHIL course or consent of instructor. Freq: Alternate Years.
An introduction to major thinkers and movements of contemporary continental philosophy, including existentialism, phenomenology, structuralism, deconstruction, neo-Marxist critical theory, semiotics, philosophical hermeneutics, French feminism, post-structuralism and post-modernism. A research paper will be required.

     
360 History of Philosophy: Ancient 3 cr
 

Prereq: One PHIL course or consent of instructor. Freq: Alternate Years.
An examination of the philosophy of the pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and Epicureans, Skeptics and Cynics, and the NeoPlatonists. Term paper required. Not open to students with credit in PHIL 260.

     
361 History of Philosophy: Early Modern 3 cr
 

Prereq: One PHIL course or consent of instructor. Freq: Alternate Years.
An examination of the philosophy of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant and their contemporaries. A research paper will be required. Not open to students with credit in PHIL 261.

     
490 Special Topics in Philosophy 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: 6 credits in PHIL or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Selected topics in philosophy will be examined.

     
494 Internship in Philosophy 1-12 cr
 

Prereq: One philosophy course, junior standing, and consent of instructor and department chair. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Provides opportunities to serve as intern in a relevant organization to incorporate critical thinking and analysis. Increases awareness of the role of philosophy in public life.

     
499 Independent Study 1-5 cr
 

Prereq: Consent of instructor and department chair. Freq: Occasionally.
Topics individually arranged.

     

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