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Psychology

UW-PARKSIDE 2017-19 CATALOG

Molinaro 275 • 262-595-2316

College:
Natural and Health Sciences

Degree and Programs Offered:
Bachelor of Science

Major - Psychology

Minors – Psychology, Health Psychology

Certificates - Human Measurement and Research, Mental Health Skills, Neuroscience

Student Organizations/Clubs:
Psi Chi, Psychology Club.

Up-to-date information can be found on the Psychology Department website.

Career Possibilities:
Typical bachelor’s level careers in mental health and criminal justice settings include hospitals, half-way houses/group homes, parole and probation, and hospice programs. Some public sector and business-related careers involve personnel testing, advertising, and human resources. For those who obtain a master’s or Ph.D. degree, career opportunities and pay expand significantly; jobs are available in mental health as well as research, teaching, and business. Some of the mental health careers for individuals with graduate degrees are clinical psychologist, social worker, professional counselor, marriage and family counselor, and school psychologist.

Department Overview

The psychology major provides a broadly based education in the content, methods, principles, and theories of the science of psychology. The required courses in the major expose students to the traditional important subject areas of psychology. The elective courses in the major allow students the flexibility to pursue their own interests and goals.

Students who are considering psychology as a major should speak with a psychology adviser early in their education. This will allow them to develop a long-range plan that best meets their educational and career goals. Students whose interests are in the social service and mental health areas should consider the Certificate in Mental Health Skills. Students whose interests are in research or human measurement should consider the Certificate in Human Measurement and Research. Students with interests in graduate school in psychological neuroscience should consider the certificate in neuroscience.

Students who intend to pursue graduate study in psychology or a related field should discuss this with their adviser as early as possible to develop a plan of study that will prepare them for graduate school. These students should plan to take more than the minimum 39 credits in psychology required for the major. They are also encouraged to complete at least one of the three certificates and to participate in PSYC 410 Externship or PSYC 499 Independent Study under the guidance of a member of the department.

Students majoring in psychology may be eligible for membership in Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology. Psychology Club is a student organization that sponsors activities of broad interest to psychology students (e.g., workshops on graduate school and discussions of employment opportunities). Contact Dr. Gurtman for information about how to join Psi Chi and/or the Psychology Club.

Program Level Outcomes

The Psychology Department has four major learning goals we expect our students to attain. They are:

  1. Communication: Students successfully communicate psychology-related material.
  2. Critical Thinking: Students apply critical thinking skills to reading scholarly material and writing a scholarly paper.
  3. Social and Personal Responsibility: Students apply psychological principles.
  4. Content Knowledge: Students can explain the major theories and research findings major areas of psychology.

Requirements for Admission to the Psychology Major

Students must have 15 credits overall and a passing grade in PSYC 101-Introduction to Psychological Science in order to be eligible for entrance into the major.

Requirements for the Psychology Major (39 credits)

To earn a bachelor of science with a major in psychology, students must meet all university requirements for the degree, all requirements for the major (see below), and have a minimum 2.50 GPA in all of their psychology course work (including transfer credits).

  1. Core Courses (9 credits)
    Required courses:  
    PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychological Science 3 cr
    PSYC 250 Psychological Statistics 3 cr
    PSYC 300 Research Methods in Psychology 3 cr
  2. Breadth Courses (9 credits)
    Required courses:  
    PSYC 205 Cognitive Psychology 3 cr
    PSYC 210 Introduction to Human Development  3 cr
    PSYC 220 Social Psychology 3 cr
  3. Depth Courses (15 credits)
    Choose 15 credits of psychology courses numbered 301 and above; NOT including PSYC 410 or 499.

  4. Elective Courses (6 credits)
    Choose 6 credits of any 200-level, 300-level, or 400-level PSYC course that is not required for the major. Only 3 credits of PSYC 499 can be applied as elective credit.

Requirements for the Psychology Minor (21 credits)

The minor program offers an organized curriculum for students who wish to develop a core understanding of psychology. The minor is not meant for students whose primary interest is the study of psychology. Instead, it is a complement to other fields of study where knowledge of psychology and its methods would be beneficial

  1. Core Courses (9 credits)
    Required courses:  
    PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychological Science 3 cr
    PSYC 250 Psychological Statistics 3 cr
    PSYC 300 Research Methods in Psychology 3 cr

    Minors may substitute an equivalent course in statistical or quantitative methods from their major for PSYC 250. However, they still have to satisfy the 21 credit minimum requirement in Psychology. Minors may NOT substitute a research methods course from their major for PSYC 300.

  2. Breadth Courses (6 credits)
    Choose two courses:  
    PSYC 205 Cognitive Psychology 3 cr
    PSYC 210 Introduction to Human Development 3 cr
    PSYC 220 Social Psychology 3 cr
  3. Depth Courses (6 credits)
    Choose six credits of psychology courses numbered 301 and above; NOT including PSYC 410 or 499.

Requirements for the Health Psychology Minor (24 credits)

The Psychology Department offers a new minor in Health Psychology.  The program was developed in combination and consultation with the Collaborative Nursing program and the College of Natural and Health Sciences. Although open to all students, the program is targeted to students pursuing Nursing, and the curriculum is designed to coordinate with the three-year pre-nursing track.

  1. Core Courses (9 credits)
    Required courses:  
    PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychological Science  3 cr
    PSYC 250 Psychological Statistics 3 cr
    PSYC 300 Research Methods in Psychology 3 cr

    Minors may substitute an equivalent course in statistical or quantitative methods from their major for PSYC 250. However, they still have to satisfy the 21 credit minimum requirement in Psychology. Minors may NOT substitute a research methods course from their major for PSYC 300.

  2. Breadth Courses (6 credits)
    Required course:  
    PSYC 210 Introduction to Human Development 3 cr
         
    Choose one course:  
    PSYC 205 Cognitive Psychology 3 cr
    PSYC 220 Social Psychology 3 cr
  3. Depth Courses (9 credits)
    Required courses:  
    PSYC 325 Biological Psychology 3 cr
    PSYC 360 Abnormal Psychology 3 cr
    PSYC 363 Health Psychology 3 cr

Requirements for the Mental Health Skills Certificate (18 credits)

The certificate program in mental health skills is an innovative program designed to teach students the kinds of applied skills necessary for successful entry-level employment in clinical settings.

  1. Core Courses (9 credits)
    Required courses:  
    PSYC 330 Interviewing 3 cr
    PSYC 360 Abnormal Psychology 3 cr
    PSYC 431 Counseling Psychology 3 cr
  2. Elective Psychology Course (3 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    PSYC 318 Psychological Assessment 3 cr
    PSYC 362 Theories of Psychotherapy 3 cr
    PSYC 363 Health Psychology 3 cr
    PSYC 410 Externship in Psychology 3 cr
  3. Elective Courses Outside Psychology (6 credits)
    Choose 6 credits from a list of courses outside the program that address issues in diversity special populations, and social problems.

    Students must also submit a portfolio for review and approval, and have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the completed courses. For further information about the program, contact one of the program advisers: Dr. Carlstrom or Dr. Gurtman.

Requirements for the Human Measurement and Research Certificate (12 credits)

The objective of the certificate in human measurement and research is to involve students in human measurement and research, including dissemination of findings. This training is of value to individuals working in careers that involve measurement and/or require empirical skills, including clinical, social, cognitive, aptitude or other forms of assessment (e.g., counseling), behavioral prediction (e.g., insurance actuary), opinion or other polling (e.g., human resource management, market research). It is also of great importance to students seeking graduate training as the skills acquired in this certificate are highly valued by most graduate programs.

The 12 credits in the required courses need to be passed with a minimum average GPA of 3.0.

  1. Required courses (12 credits)
    PSYC 318 Psychological Assessment  3 cr
    PSYC 492 Psychology Research Seminar 3 cr
    PSYC 499 Independent Study 6 cr
  2. A dissemination project is also required.
    For further information about the program contact the program adviser Dr. Beyer.

Requirement for Admission to the Neuroscience Certificate

Before enrolling in the certificate, students must pass BIOS 101 with a B- or better.

Requirements for the Neuroscience Certificate (16-17 credits)

The certificate in neuroscience is a rigorous program designed to 1. provide students with a comprehensive background in how psychological processes are produced by the brain and 2. train students to critically evaluate neuroscience research reports in psychology and to generate and effectively communicate their own research plans. The certificate is an innovative program designed to prepare students for graduate programs in psychological neuroscience.

All courses that apply toward completion of the certificate must be passed with a minimum GPA of 3.0.

  1. Required courses (13 credits)
    BIOS 101 Bioscience 4 cr
    PSYC 325 Biological Psychology 3 cr
    PSYC 326 Cognitive Neuroscience 3 cr
    BIOS 420 Neuroscience 3 cr

    Students will be required to submit a portfolio for review and approval. The portfolio will consist of a research proposal (to be completed in PSYC 326) and a critical evaluation of a neurological condition (to be completed in BIOS 420).

  2. Electives (3-4 credits)
    Choose one course:  
    BIOS 300 Human Functional Anatomy 4 cr
    PSYC 306 Sensation and Perception 3 cr
    For further information about the program contact one of the program advisers: Dr. Gregg (Psychology) or Dr. Lewis (Biology).

Courses in Psychology (PSYC)

101 Introduction to Psychological Science 3 cr
 

Prereq: ENGL 100 or concurrent enrollment. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Introduces the scientific study of mind and behavior, providing coverage of the major areas of research in psychology, including thinking, social interaction, human development, the nervous systems, abnormal psychology, personality, learning, the history and applications of psychological science, and others.

     
205 Cognitive Psychology 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 101. Freq: Fall.
Covers theory and research of human cognitive processes including perception, attention, visual cognition, learning, memory, language, decision making, problem solving, intelligence, and social cognition.

     
210 Introduction to Human Development 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 101. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Covers theories, concepts, and research pertaining to human development throughout the lifespan including biological, cognitive, emotional, and social development.

     
220 Social Psychology 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 101. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Studies the individual in social contexts. Topics include person perception, attribution processes, the self, interpersonal attraction, attitude formation, aggression, prosocial behavior and social influence

     
241 Psychology of Aging 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 101. Freq: Spring.
Survey of research and theory on the human aging process including physical, cognitive, and social sciences.

     
250 Psychological Statistics 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 101, completion of computational skills requirement. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Applies descriptive and inferential statistics to the research problems of psychology including computer analysis of data projects.

     
260 Psychology of Personality 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 101. Freq: Occasionally.
Theories, models, and conceptions of personality, methods of studying personality, and research findings

     
280 Psychology of Gender 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 101. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Research on the effects of gender on cognition, personality, emotions, interpersonal relations, labor-force participation and behavior. Theories of gender role development and gender typing are examined. Not available to students with credit in PSYC 380.

     
290 Special Topics in Psychology 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 101. Freq: Occasionally.
Selected topics in psychology.

     
300 Research Methods in Psychology 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 250 or BIOS 210; completion of reading and writing. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Analyzes scientific methods in psychology. Includes research design, data collection and interpretation, computer-based statistical analysis, and writing research reports.

     
301  Learning and Memory 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 205, 300. Freq: Spring.
Coverage of theory and research of human learning and memory. Learning topics include classical and operant conditioning, observational learning, and classroom learning. Memory topics include implicit memory, semantic memory, and episodic memory.

     
304  Language Development  3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 300 or ENGL 287. Freq: Occasionally.
The child’s development of the sounds, grammar, meanings, and social knowledge that underlie the ability to use language; theories of language acquisition; and the relation of oral language to the acquisition of literacy.

     
306 Sensation and Perception 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 205, 300. Freq: Occasionally.
Analysis of the sensory organs and perceptual mechanisms used in vision, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. Primary emphasis is on vision and audition.

     
307 Cross-Cultural Psychology 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 220 or 260. Freq: Spring.
Research and theories on the ways in which culture influences human development, social interactions and perceptions; the self and psychological functioning are also discussed.

     
314 Cognitive Development of Children 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 210, 300. Freq: Occasionally.
Advanced coverage of theories, concepts, and research pertaining to the development of children’s thinking. Topics include perceptual and conceptual development, language and cognition, and memory development.

     
318 Psychological Assessment  3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 101, 250. Freq: Fall.
Assesses individual characteristics including issues related to measurement, test construction, test usage, reliability and validity, and specialized applications.

     
325 Biological Psychology 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 101 or BIOS 101. Freq: Fall.
Covers brain structure, neural communication, the neural control of movement, the biological basis of complex behaviors (such as sleep, learning, memory, sex, language, and addiction), emotion, and psychological disorders.

     
326 Cognitive Neuroscience 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 205, 300; or consent instructor. Freq: Spring
Covers how cognitive processes are explained by the structure and function of the brain. Topics include neuroanatomy, research methods, and many of the major areas of study within the field, such as perceptual processing, object recognition, language, memory, emotion, and attention.  Lab Fees required.

     
330 Interviewing 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 205 or 210 or 220 or 260. Freq: Spring.
Uses and forms of interviewing; problems of interview communication, reliability, and validity; interview strategies, techniques, and tactics; and behavioral processes and research on interviewing.

     
334 Infant Development 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 210, 300. Freq: Fall.
Covers advanced theories, concepts, and research pertaining to human development during the first two years of life including physical, motor, perceptual, cognitive, and social development, with focus on early mechanisms of change.

     
360 Abnormal Psychology 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 205 or 210 or 220 or 260. Freq: Spring.
Examines mental and behavioral disorders including theoretical models, diagnosis and classification, research findings, and treatment approaches.

     
362 Theories of Psychotherapy 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 205 or 210 or 220 or 260. Freq: Yearly.
Compares the major, systematic approaches to psychotherapy. Integrates case study analyses with theory. Includes research findings on the process and outcome of psychotherapy.

     
363 Health Psychology 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 220 or 260. Freq: Spring.
An introduction to the major theoretical approaches, research findings, and principles of health psychology. Topics include stress and coping; and the role of lifestyle, personality, and social support in health and illness. Links between psychology and specific diseases will be considered.

     
380 Psychology of Gender 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 220 and either PSYC 300 or SOCA 295. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Research on the effects of gender on cognition, personality, emotions, interpersonal relations, labor-force participation and behavior. Theories of gender role development and gender typing are examined. Not available to students with credit in PSYC 280.

     
390 Special Topics in Psychology 1-4 cr
 

Prereq: Varies by topic. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines selected topics in psychology.

     
410 Externship in Psychology  3 cr
 

Prereq: 18 credits in psychology,3.00 GPA in psychology courses, and consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Supervised experiences in planned projects done in a community setting.

     
421 The Self 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 220, 300. Freq: Occasionally.
Explores the self from a social psychological perspective. Examines theories and research on the self and teaches verbal and written communication skills.

     
431 Counseling Psychology 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 330 or 362. Freq: Fall.
Fundamental techniques of counseling, including assessment of client problems, exploration of behavioral alternatives, applying psychological principles to effect change, and counseling relationship skills.

     
441 Advanced Human Development Seminar 3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 210 and PSYC 300. Freq: Occasionally.
Focused study of a specific developmental topic such as moral development, adult cognitive development, Piagetian theory, etc. Primary reliance on advanced methodological issues, research reports, and primary theoretical sources.

     
490 Special Topics in Psychology 1-3 cr
 

Prereq: Varies by topic. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines selected advanced topics in psychology.

     
492 Psychology Research Seminar  3 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 300 and consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Advanced hands-on experience working collectively with faculty and other students on faculty and student research projects. Students will assist in designing, administering, analyzing and reporting original empirical research in Psychology. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

     
497 Thesis in Psychology 1-3 cr
 

Prereq: Consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.

     
499 Independent Study 1-6 cr
 

Prereq: PSYC 300, consent of instructor and department chair. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Participation in research activities under the direction of a faculty member.

     

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