RANGER RECOVERY
The Rita Tallent Picken Regional Center for Arts and Humanities

in the galleries

Senior Shows Spring 2022

SPRING 2022 SENIOR SHOWS

Violet Alizabeth  |  Michael Kavanagh
Apr 26-29
Foundation Gallery
Reception  Wed, Apr 27  |  4-6:30 pm

Janet Arriaga  |  Shelby Severson
May 2-6
Foundation Gallery
Reception  Thu, May 5  |  4-6:30 pm

Avianna Davis  |  Olivia Deckard
May 9-14
Foundation Gallery
Reception  Wed, May 11  |  4-6:30 pm

Together Again

Together Again: Racine Kenosha


Fine Arts Gallery   |  Feb 8-May 13, 2022 
Reception  Sun, Apr 24  |  4:30 PM

Virtual Exhibition

UW-Parkside is pleased to host Together Again, our second survey of contemporary artists working in Racine and Kenosha as the kickoff event for our celebration of 10 Years at the Rita Tallent Picken Center for Arts & Humanities. This all-media exhibition was juried by Shana McCaw, formerly Senior Curator at the Charles Allis and Villa Terrace Museums, now Creative Director and Co-Founder at Current Projects in Milwaukee, WI.

ARTIST PROFILES

In COMM 350 Digital Storytelling, students learn key concepts for storytelling including structure, function, and context of narrative. Through hands-on practice, they learn to put theories into action and to become creative and effective storytellers in the digital media world. In Fall 2021, students teamed up with Parkside Galleries to profile local and visiting artists. After interviewing and researching four amazing artists, the students put together the following short films and blog posts.

Hans Video

Hans Habeger

Everyday Beauty: A Profile of Hans Habeger 

Everyday Beauty is a six-minute journey into the artistic process of Hans Habeger, a painter and a drawer from Libertyville, Illinois. He’s best known for his pieces which capture suburban commercial landscapes. His subjects often appear mundane on the surface, but are revealed to have an inner beauty when viewed from Hans’ perspective. Our film was created by three young filmmakers from the University of Wisconsin Parkside tasked with interviewing a local artist, and the final cut is the result of their talents, mistakes, insufficiencies, and artistic visions.  

The process of creating Everyday Beauty began with an interview with Hans. One of the team’s first ideas for the film was to conduct the interview in Hans’ studio. We felt that doing so would allow us to capture Hans in his element, and give our audience a look behind the scenes. Little did we know that Hans works from home, and that visiting his studio would mean visiting his home. This turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Being welcomed into Hans’ home was a wonderful experience, and it helped us become closer to him. We got the chance to step into not only his work life, but his home life as well. It isn’t in the film, but we were able to see the space where his child tries to follow in daddy’s footsteps by practicing their finger painting. We got to meet Hans adorable puppy (we couldn’t resist giving him a cameo in the film). In the end, footage from Hans’ home studio ended up being the backbone of our film, and I believe that it yielded ample material of Hans comfortably speaking to us about his life, process, and work. Hopefully that came through in the final product.  

Another major aspect of the film is the use of images of Hans’ completed works juxtaposed with footage from the real-life locations that they were based on. We felt that shots like these provided a great visual, one that helped to illustrate the point of Hans’ work. Hans endeavors to give these locations their moment in the sun, to show the beauty that lurks beneath the surface of what most of us pass by every day. By showing what is, and contrasting it with how Hans sees it, we’re able to help the audience relate to what Hans is doing. We wouldn’t have been able to accomplish this without Hans’ help. We followed him to these locations and he not only agreed to pose for some of the shots, but he also gave us a lot of interesting information about why he chose these locations. This experience helped us become closer with Hans, and made it possible for us to convey more about him in the film.  

Throughout the film we show images of Hans’ artwork, and images of Hans’ studio. We wanted to make sure that the film not only focused on Hans as a person, but also on how he and his work and linked together. As much as possible, we used his own artwork to illustrate that points that Hans was making during the interview. We tried to match the images displayed with the story being told. I think that it came across.  

Hans was incredibly helpful during this whole process. He was willing to go above and beyond in order to help us make the best film possible, and we’re grateful to him. We hope that the final cut does him justice.  

Rafael Francisco Salas video

A Poverty of Beauty 

A Poverty of Beauty 

A blog about Rafael Francisco Salas

Our story begins with a shot of a flower swaying in a field. This natural image contrasts with the artificial confines of a commercial strip.  As soft music settles in, Rafael Francisco Salas describes a poverty of beauty he sees in our culture.   

Everything is about convenience, while the natural state of the world is abandoned. This opening sequence hooks the viewer in and introduces a main theme of Rafael’s story. We gain insight into his perspective before diving into the details of his artistic vision. 

A Story in Coming 

Rafael explores his own identity and how he kept it separate from his early artwork.  As more of his story unfolds, we learn of a transition where he began to embrace his heritage and incorporate it into his professional work.   

The selected pieces highlight Rafael’s artistic ability and ties to a theme. Additional shots show a rural setting, the environment that often inspires his creativity. Rafael takes these ideas and begins to add a personal touch to make his art more relevant to his own understanding. 

Wasted Days and Wasted Nights 

Freddy Fender is known for his music, and it was one song in particular that invoked the story of Rafael’s truest collection. “Wasted Days and Wasted Nights” is a deep and profound exploration of the artist’s experience accompanied by country music.   

Rafael’s heritage and life in rural Wisconsin are the concepts that this collection feeds upon. These artistic selections would serve as a transition in his career. For the first time, Rafael was making artwork that spoke to his own identity. 

The Mythology of Rural America 

Country music plays in the background throughout the duration of Rafael’s story. It is this genre that fascinates Rafael the most. He describes a mythology behind the music and how it portrays an honest and sometimes grim reality about rural America. The majority of Rafael’s artwork takes place in a country setting.   

One striking piece displays a dying lamb with its body cut open.  These dark yet reflective themes tie into the creative edge of Rafael’s artwork. The mythology of rural America is a topic that has great relevance to each piece. 

Beauty from the Not 

Rafael’s message comes full circle with the closing of his story. We return to the poverty of beauty – the commercial strip, and then the flower in the field. It is with these shots that Rafael delivers his message.   

Everyone must take the time in their lives to recognize the poverty of beauty in the world around them and add their own beauty to it. The music is left to play as the viewer reflects on the field, and a final piece of Rafael’s artwork is shown. In a short five minutes, the viewer has been introduced to Rafael Francisco Salas, his art, and the mark he hopes to inspire. The world isn’t always pretty, but we can all find a way to use our talents and make it better for everyone around us. 

Scott Terry video

Scott Terry

Capturing Our Community in Art:  A Profile of Scott Terry 

When first looking at Scott Terry’s work before meeting him, we did not know what to expect. He uses bright colors and covers vast ideals of Black humanity. Terry draws influence from his identity and life experiences and puts this forth in his work.  

He touches on how he had ambitions to be a professional football player, and how this influenced his extraordinary art career. 

We chose to include these parts from the interview because they resonated with us, and we knew they would resonate with other viewers. Common struggles and finding your way in life is something many people go through. This video serves the purpose of telling a small part of a local artist's life as well as introducing some important projects Terry is working on that shed light on our community, its problems, and its power.  

Much of our b-roll comes straight from Scott’s gallery, and this gives us creators a way to help the audience visualize both Scott’s art and the community of artists that surround him. We enjoyed learning about how Scott puts his heart into his work, which frequently touches on the experiences of the Black community in the Racine/Kenosha area. While working on this piece we learned the whole logistical flow of creating a short, small biopic of a local artist. This includes contacting, setting up meetings, and filming the interview. As a team, we then edit down the best parts and put those into the video. It gave our group a small experience into this type of situation that would happen in the real world. Besides using the interview footage itself, we used complimentary b-roll along with b-roll from Scott’s gallery.  

Communication was hard as it has been during the pandemic, but we were able to overcome and figure out when and where to conduct our interview. When the interview came around, we felt well prepared with plenty of questions that covered a range of topics that truly showed who Terry is as an artist and a person. This experience showed us the basic process of an interview and gave us knowledge that we can use in the future. Not being the interviewer, other group members learned how to operate a camera in a 3 point interview and to use a switchboard during the process to change between cameras.  

Our digital storytelling skills will allow us to capture things that we experience and put them out there for everyone to enjoy.  

All in all, to learn about Terry, his life, and his artwork was a truly eye-opening experience. Terry’s dedication to his art through his cultural background shines in all his pieces and makes people keep coming back to see his work. 

Carey Watters video

Carey Watters

Carey Watters: Crafting Feminist Histories 

Drawing inspiration from her US travels out east, to the west coast, Midwest, and all over the world, Carey showcases her emotions and life experiences through her art. Her work especially resonates with women. It depicts the struggles and emotions that many deal with on a day-to-day basis. Whether it be what they are going through on a personal level or how they are being affected by the world around them such as the isolation caused by Covid-19, Carey’s work hits home.  

In making the film, our production team wanted to show how each step she takes in her work leads to a finished product that is not just a flat-surfaced form of art. She incorporates paper cut-outs, found objects, and photography. We wanted to showcase her how her unique work process adds meaning to her creations. For example, the assemblage of materials depict tears, blood, and detached heads of female figures.  

In this interview, Carey goes into detail about how the detached heads in her work have meaning which many women can connect to: of being pulled in multiple directions by competing obligations and trying to find oneself in the midst of the mess. 

In the process of conducting this interview, it was important for our production team to include up-close and detailed shots of Carey’s work to get the full emotional impact. Her pieces are a reflection of herself and everything that has happened in her life which was vital for us to show in this video.  

Through the process of creating this film, our production team learned some of the basics of effective storytelling, such as how tell a wider narrative out of several short clips. 

A limitation our production team came across was coordinating between multiple people to accomplish our goals, especially during the pandemic. We would have loved to include more of Carey's work and more of what she had to say in relation to her artistic life and inspirations for her work. The possibility of including more b-roll and dialogue from our interview did exist if only more of our production team members were experienced in using Premiere Pro, the video editing software. Despite this, working on a story to share about Carey’s art, we learned that to capture a viewer's emotions, such as her work captured ours, we had to find a way to bring her vivid descriptions to life. Without her explanations, we would simply be looking at something we might find fascinating, strange, or just interesting without knowing the feminist inspiration behind it.  

After working on Carey Watters's film, we realized that so much work is put into professional clips and audio. There is much brainstorming and work that goes into any short film or videos. In watching this interview, we hope you, the viewer, become inspired by Carey’s artwork and its emotional resonance.  

RECENT VIRTUAL EXHIBITIONS, EVENTS, AND CATALOGS

Deb Sukolow Work

Deb Sokolow: Loose History

Catalog Exhibition and Virtual Exhibition

The selection of drawings included in the exhibition present seemingly harmless anecdotes on a number of former U.S. presidents, unnamed presidential candidates, campaigns, intelligence figures, and a presidential lover.

Virtual Exhibition  Catalog Artist Talk Recording Discussion Recording

Sky Hopinka Still

Sky Hopinka

Virtual Exhibition

Sky Hopinka is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin and a descendent of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. His videos use figures and texts, layered and dense in image and sound, movement and meaning, to question the complications of knowledge, access, and artifact.

Virtual Exhibition

Kate Mothes

Building an Online Presence in the World of Art

Discussion with Kate Mothes

From the perspective of running and curating an online contemporary art platform, Kate Mothes discusses the quickly changing landscape of online presence in the art world, especially the emergence of virtual platforms over the last several years, from artist-run culture to pandemic phenomenon. Additionally she will discuss why an online presence is essential for professional artists today, especially social media and websites, along with tips for time management and networking.

Discussion Recording


About the Artist
Kate Mothes is founder and curator of Young Space and Co-founder/Editor of Dovetail Magazine. Young Space (yngspc) is an independent, itinerant, online-offline contemporary art platform emphasizing early career and emerging artists. Dovetail Magazine is an independent online + print contemporary arts publication that positions contemporary visual art in dialogue with design, architecture, photography, travel, and global visual culture. Mothes earned a Bachelors in Art History from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a Masters in the History of Art, Theory and Display from Edinburgh College of Art at the University of Edinburgh. She is currently based in Northeast Wisconsin.

Esther Pearl Watson

Esther Pearl Watson: Dream Believer

Catalog Exhibition

Watson grew up in series of small towns outside of Dallas, Texas with her siblings, mother, and flying saucer-building father, Gene. Her family moved often, since her father's hobby of building huge flying saucers out of scrap metal and car engines didn't always sit well with the neighbors. Esther's pieces are often overtly narrative, clear but mysterious scenes of houses or figures ornamented with snippets of prose telling just enough to get the viewer's own imagination engaged, wanting to know more. Some are about family, some about places, all have a rich interior life. Her works without words are just as suggestive of story, also exerting a deep emotional pull. 

Exhibition Catalog

Kevin Miyazaki

Kevin Miyazaki: Kuroshio

Catalog Exhibition

Miyazaki’s exhibition tells a story of immigration and migration. It begins by documenting the reuse of buildings from the Tule Lake and Heart Mountain Japanese internment camps, where members of Miyazaki’s father’s family were incarcerated during World War ll. The word “camp” is used by most Nisei, or first-generation Japanese Americans, to describe both the physical place they were held, as well as the overall wartime incarceration experience itself. Miyazaki’s interests lie in examining the changing value of architectural forms constructed as a result of wartime hysteria and racist attitudes. The work continues by documenting additional elements and moments from Miyazaki’s personal history that communicates something larger about our shared humanity.

Exhibition Catalog

Our Stories

Our Stories

A video installation by Kevin Miyazaki
 

View Virtual Exhibition

Many of the themes explored in Kevin Miyazaki's artwork are centered around his family history and the larger story of Japanese Americans in this country. He is deeply interested in the ancestors who came before him, the paths of their migration, the stories of their lives and their place in American society. These ideas were on view during an exhibition at UW-Parkside in November 2019-January 2020, with a hope that they inspire viewers to think more deeply about their own American ethnic story.

In the interest of exploring other individual family histories, and to celebrate the diversity present on the UW-Parkside campus, Miyazaki met and photographed students from the classes of Sarah Piña, Assistant Professor of Latina/o Literature and Caitlin Quintenz, Visiting Assistant Professor in the Modern Languages Department. The students were encouraged to write about their family history - and the images and text were made into a 43-minute video.


About the Artist

Kevin J. Miyazaki is an artist and photographer based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. His artwork focuses on issues of ethnicity, migration and place, often addressing family history and the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War ll. Miyazaki was born and raised in suburban Milwaukee, culturally and physically far from ancestral roots in Japan, Hawaii, and Washington state. His photographs have been exhibited at venues including Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Griffin Museum of Photography, Museum of Wisconsin Art, The Center for Photography at Woodstock, and Hyde Park Art Center.

Santiago Cucullu

Mo...un...tain

Santiago Cucullu

Virtual Exhibition Artist Talk Recording

Mo...un...tain is an exhibition of new work by Argentinian-born artist Santiago Cucullu. Emphasizing the subtleties of intuitive pacing and spatial orientation, Cucullu makes work using a duality of materials and appropriation to indicate that an exhibition space can act to trigger memories and experiences that we may encounter as rarified moments. Cucullu’s current exhibition, Mo…un...tain, brings to mind the accumulation of the scope of issues in our current experience. Composed of a wall of drawings, a large-scale photo installation, and a vinyl and ceramic wall work, the exhibition in part illustrates this, while also pushing against the current order. For Mo…un…tain, Cucullu looked for moments that were melancholy, but sometimes humorous, while seeming to be removed from, but relevant to our current experience of Covid-19 and a rapidly deteriorating political situation. About the Artist Santiago Cucullu currently lives in Milwaukee, WI. He has exhibited at the Walker Art Center of Minneapolis; Blum and Poe Gallery, Los Angeles; Fondazione Sandretto Rebaudengo, Turin, Italy; Mori Art Museum, Tokyo and Gavin Brown Enterprise at Passerby, New York; Musee de Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Monterrey and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Perry Rubenstein Gallery, New York; and Loock Galerie in Berlin. He has been included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum, New York; the Singapore Biennial at the Biennial of the Americas, Denver, and the Wisconsin Triennial at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. He holds a MFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design (1999). Mo...un...tain Santiago Cucullu Through Dec 16 Mo...un...tain is an exhibition of new work by Argentinian-born artist Santiago Cucullu. Emphasizing the subtleties of intuitive pacing and spatial orientation, Cucullu makes work using a duality of materials and appropriation to indicate that an exhibition space can act to trigger memories and experiences that we may encounter as rarified moments. Cucullu’s current exhibition, Mo…un...tain, brings to mind the accumulation of the scope of issues in our current experience. Composed of a wall of drawings, a large-scale photo installation, and a vinyl and ceramic wall work, the exhibition in part illustrates this, while also pushing against the current order. For Mo…un…tain, Cucullu looked for moments that were melancholy, but sometimes humorous, while seeming to be removed from, but relevant to our current experience of Covid-19 and a rapidly deteriorating political situation.

About the Artist
Santiago Cucullu currently lives in Milwaukee, WI. He has exhibited at the Walker Art Center of Minneapolis; Blum and Poe Gallery, Los Angeles; Fondazione Sandretto Rebaudengo, Turin, Italy; Mori Art Museum, Tokyo and Gavin Brown Enterprise at Passerby, New York; Musee de Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Monterrey and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Perry Rubenstein Gallery, New York; and Loock Galerie in Berlin. He has been included in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum, New York; the Singapore Biennial at the Biennial of the Americas, Denver, and the Wisconsin Triennial at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. He holds a MFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design (1999).

Art = Heart

Art = Heart


View Virtual Exhibition

We asked K12 students in our region to think about how being creative and making art brings them joy, comfort, peace, happiness—all things for a positive mindset. Then they translated those thoughts into amazing original artwork: photographs, digital art, paintings, drawings, and more.
 

AWARD WINNERS (PDF)
Kimberly Lagunas | Best in Show
Loden Chapman | Most Inventive
Helene Holland | Campus Choice
Esme Reilly | Most Heart
Roger Martinez | Dean's Favorite

Shaun Slifer

The Strike Was Broken: Redacted Historical Marker Rubbings
Shaun Slifer


View Virtual Exhibition

Shaun Slifer makes rubbings of historical markers as a project for understanding the language of state-sanctioned history through intentional erasure and omission which mirrors that of many “official” narratives. This work interrupts the provisional authority of the historical marker by disrupting static, languid interpretations of the plaque’s narrative.

He is focused on state-sanctioned historical plaques that feature language which glosses over or replaces colonialism, state oppression, and military violence with truncated accounts that marginalize the motivation and origin of popular revolts, disregard whole communities, and other acts of erasure. He searches for wording that drives a particular, dominant historical narrative, carefully excluding, or redacting, the other text on the plaque. By letting negative space dominate the large sheets of paper, critical sections of directive language stand out, akin to the practice of erasure poetry.

These wax-relief rubbings are made on-site using hand-made crayons. His process is deliberately visible, public and accessible. Wearing a high-vis fluorescent vest, Slifer carries a roll of durable Tyvek paper, crayons that have been melted into palm-sized discs, and a short ladder. These rubbings are made during daylight hours while looking similar to a municipal worker.


About the Artist

Shaun Slifer (b.1979) is an Appalachian artist, nonfiction author, self-taught historian, scrimshander, and museum professional based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His multidisciplinary creative work challenges the oppression of currently-dominant historical narratives, both social and ecological. 

He is the Creative Director at the award-winning West Virginia Mine Wars Museum, and a founding member of the Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative. He is an original member of the now-disbanded Howling Mob Society, and former collaborator with Street Art Workers.

Shaun has exhibited internationally in a variety of museums, galleries, and nonprofit spaces, as well as non-authorized public settings. He has presented on his research and creative practice at numerous universities and conferences in the United States and Western Europe. His work has been exhibited across the US and the world, including at the Queens Museum, the Biennial of Graphic Arts (Ljubljana, Slovenia), and the U.S. Pavilion at the 13th International Architecture Exhibition – la Biennale di Venezia (Italy). For his work with the West Virginia Mine Wars Museum, he was presented with Honorary Membership in the United Mine Workers of America, Local 1440 in Matewan, WV (he is now an Associate Member). His forthcoming book, So Much To Be Angry About: Appalachian Movement Press 1969-79 will be available on West Virginia University Press in the spring of 2021.

Currently living in Pittsburgh, PA, with roots in Nebraska and Tennessee, he received a BFA with a concentration in sculpture from Watkins College of Art in Nashville in 2003.

Beginnings

Beginnings: three early-career Wisconsin artists
Alyssa Krause | Daniel McCullough |  LaNia Sproles

View Virtual Exhibition

LaNia Sproles is exhibiting large cutout mixed media figurative collages. The philosophies of self-perception, queer and feminist theories, and inherent racial dogmas are essential to her work.

Alyssa Krause’s paintings question the parameters of perception. Her work focuses on the nuances in how an image is recognized. Rules are set up before painting as a way to create a border between herself and the work, making each painting surprising and fresh.

Daniel McCullough investigates the atmosphere of place through chance-based approaches to photography. He uses the mysterious space between the camera lens and outside world to make his work. Through physical manipulations onto the surface of film prior to exposure, McCullough incorporates expressive gestures into photographic observations. He combines more straightforward digital captures with his hand-manipulated images on film to create a layered view of his subjects. 


About the Artists

Alyssa Krause, Milwaukee, WI, received her BFA with an emphasis in Painting & Drawing at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2019. Her work has been shown locally in Milwaukee and across the Midwest. She is currently represented by Tappan Collective LA.

Daniel McCullough is a visual artist based in Milwaukee, WI. Daniel received his Bachelor of Fine Arts from Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design in 2018. He was selected for the Plum Blossom Initiative Bridge Work 04 Professional Development Program, 2018-2019. Daniel has shown his work both regionally and nationally. He is represented by the Alice Wilds, Milwaukee, WI. 

LaNia Sproles, Milwaukee, WI, graduated with a BFA from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design in 2017. She recently completed her year as a 2019 Mary L. Nohl fellow and teaching artist in residence at the Lynden Sculpture Garden in Milwaukee. She has a solo exhibition at the Wright Museum, Beloit, WI, that runs through April 2, 2021.

Grimm

Kledage, sculptural objects from Gerit Grimm

View Virtual Exhibition  View Ceramics Demonstration

Kledage (meaning clothing in German) is a collection of sculptural objects from Gerit Grimm including both her highly-acclaimed, wheel-thrown ceramic figures and her recent fabric sculpture.

Grimm’s ceramic works pair an often-whimsical subject matter steeped in folklore, referencing fairytales, fables, and princesses with impressive feats of technical virtuosity and physical scale. The surface of her work is austere and stone-like; feeling monumental and permanent.

Five handmade fabric dresses, which reference the same folk traditions and fairytales of her clay sculptures, are included in this exhibition. During Grimm’s recent sabbatical she was locked out of her communal Ceramic studio and turned to fabric as a way to continue making during Covid-19. After a three-month class on garment making in Berlin, Grimm began making her own textile sculptures. These sculptures are adaptations of the German dirndl, made by combining traditional fabrics with contemporary fabrics containing Grimm’s hand-drawn fairytales and peasant scenes.
 

About the Artist

Gerit Grimm was born in Halle, German Democratic Republic. In 1995, she finished her apprenticeship, learning the traditional German trade as a potter at the “Altbürgeler blau-weiss GmbH” in Bürgel, Germany and worked as a Journeyman for Joachim Jung in Glashagen, Germany. She earned an Art and Design Diploma in 2001 studying ceramics at Burg Giebichenstein, Halle, Germany. In 2002, she was awarded with the German DAAD Government Grant for the University of Michigan School of Art and Design, where she graduated with an MA in 2002. She received her MFA from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 2004. She has taught at CSULB, Pitzer College, Doane College and MSU Bozeman and has worked at major residencies like Mc Coll Center, Bemis Center, Kohler Arts & Industry Program and Archie Bray Foundation. In 2009 NET Television created “Fantasia in Clay” a Nebraska Story about artist Gerit Grimm. Grimm is now an Assistant Professor at University of Wisconsin, Madison. 

National Print Exhibition

27th Parkside National Print Exhibition

View Virtual Exhibition 

One of the longest-running competitive print exhibitions in the Midwest, the Parkside National Print Exhibition has shown some of the finest examples of original prints from artists nationwide. 

Juror John Hitchcock | Artist, Professor of Art and Associate Dean of Arts at UW-Madison

Rafael Francisco Salas

Artist Talk Recording

About the Artist
Rafael Francisco Salas is a Wisconsin-based artist. He combines landscape, the legacy of portraiture, architecture, and country music into artwork that evokes a strange, rural poetry. It reflects a personal journey of mixed race identity, conflict, beauty and devotion played out on the vast landscapes of rural Wisconsin.

His work has been exhibited in New York City, San Diego, Boston, as well as many venues in the Midwest including The Neville Public Museum, The Museum of Wisconsin Art, The John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Dean Jensen gallery, Circa Gallery and Frank Juarez Gallery. His work is represented by Portrait Society Gallery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Salas has also worked as an art critic for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Newcity Art in Chicago and Urban Milwaukee. Salas is a professor of art at Ripon College in Ripon, WI.

 

From the Artist
My artwork reflects on American tradition and identity. It speaks to an indignant desire for a dream continually just beyond reach. It is a strange, rural poetry of aspiration and poignant reality, a striver’s endeavor of high and low culture, situated between the elevated and the abject.

Country music is the appropriate soundtrack.

Gallery Hours

Tue-Fri  |  9 am-4 pm
Or by appointment

Gallery Director
Colin Matthes
gallery@uwp.edu

About Parkside Galleries

We are educationally-driven with thematically-focused, interdisciplinary exhibitions. Although we do not have the staff to actively review all exhibition submissions, we invite artists to introduce themselves by sending an email with a link to a website address. We are always on the lookout for new and interesting work, especially if it intersects with our educational mission.

Box Office

262-595-2188
boxoffice@uwp.edu

The Rita, Ground Floor
900 Wood Rd. 
Kenosha, WI 53144
Parking: Lot B, C

About The Rita

Since 1968, the University of Wisconsin-Parkside has continued to build a reputation as an outstanding liberal arts institution with particularly strong fine arts programs. With The Rita Tallent Picken Center for Arts & Humanities, our state-of-the-art instructional facilities and stunning performance venues match our award-winning academic programs and provide even greater community access. Learn more about The RIta.

Directions to The Rita  |  Download Campus Map

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