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Gregory Richards, Ph.D.

  • Associate Professor - Biological Sciences
  • Biological Sciences Department
  • Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2008
  • PHONE: (262) 595-2174
  • EMAIL: richarg0@uwp.edu
Gregory Richards

AREAS OF EXPERTISE

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Microbial Genetics
  • Microbial Symbioses and Pathogenesis
  • Bacterial Stress Responses
I study bacterial regulatory responses to stress. I received my undergraduate degree in Bacteriology with a certificate in Technical Communications from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I also received my PhD in Microbiology from UW-Madison in 2008. I then conducted postdoctoral research as an NIH fellow at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign prior to moving to my current position at UW-Parkside. You can read more about my teaching, research, and consulting interests in the section below.

Teaching Interests

I have a long-standing passion for teaching students about science. At UW-Parkside, I teach intro microbiology lectures and labs for both majors (BIOS 303) and non-majors (BIOS 202), advanced microbiology for undergraduate and graduate students (BIOS 411/611), and introductory cellular and molecular biology (BIOS 101). I place a high priority on training students in inquiry-based scientific and critical thinking, as well as providing students with opportunities to practice and develop useful laboratory skills, both of which are essential to careers in science and medicine. I also place a high priority on showing students that there is no reason you can't have fun while doing good science!

Research Interests

I study the physiology and regulation of bacterial responses to stress. In particular, I study how the bacterium Escherichia coli responds to metabolic stress caused by excessive accumulation of sugar-phosphates. I was fortunate to be awarded a National Institutes of Health grant to support this work. You can read more about the grant and research here:

NIH Grant Research

I love having students do research in my lab, and I greatly value training students in scientific thinking and practical lab skills.

I have had the joy of working with a diverse array of truly exceptional students, and I am honored to be able to say that 100% of the more than two dozen students who I have mentored in research have gone on to medical school, graduate school, or jobs in their chosen scientific field. In the past decade, seven students who I have mentored in research also have been featured as co-authors on peer-reviewed publications, and many students have presented their research at both professional and undergraduate student conferences.

Here is a talk on my research that I did for Wisconsin Public Television's "University Place" program, titled, "Sugar Shock: How Bacteria Use RNAs to Deal with Stress":

WPT Research Talk

Here is a talk on why microbes are so awesome that I did for Wisconsin Public Television, titled, "Bacterial Hunger Games: The Mastery of Microbes Over Our Diet, Digestion, and Disease":

WPT Microbe Talk

Consulting Interests


I greatly enjoy doing science outreach and talking with the public about all topics related to microbiology! I also regularly do career advising and one-on-one career consulting for high school, undergrad, and grad students as well as postdocs and colleagues in the field of microbiology. (For example, I have served as a career adviser for the American Society for Microbiology General Meeting and Life Sciences Career Day at UW-Madison.)

Please feel free to contact me about outreach and career advising activities. The easiest/fastest way to contact me is the email address at the top of this profile.

In addition to the seminars listed under "Research Interests" above, here is a fun Halloween-themed talk I did for UW-Parkside's Science Night, titled, "The Scary Side of Microbes":

UWP Science Night Talk

Here is an excerpt from an interview about careers in science research and education that I did with the UW-Madison Graduate School:


Graduate School interview


Selected Publications

2017: Stringent response regulators contribute to the recovery from glucose-phosphate stress in Escherichia coli, Applied and Environmental Microbiology

2016: Physiological effects of post-transcriptional regulation by the small RNA SgrS during metabolic stress in Escherichia coli. In Stress and environmental control of gene expression in bacteria, Wiley-Blackwell.

2015: Small RNAs regulate primary and secondary metabolism in gram-negative bacteria. In Metabolism and Bacterial Pathogenesis, Microbiology Spectrum, ASM Press

2013: Depletion of glycolytic intermediates plays a key role in glucose-phosphate stress in Escherichia coli, Journal of Bacteriology

2012: Induction of the Pho regulon suppresses the growth defect of an Escherichia coli sgrS mutant, connecting phosphate metabolism to the glucose-phosphate stress response., Journal of Bacteriology

2011: Molecular call and response: the physiology of bacterial small RNAs, Biochimica et Biophysica Acta

BIOS 101 - BIOSCIENCE
BIOS 202 - GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY
BIOS 303 - MICROBIOLOGY
BIOS 411 - MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY/DIVERSITY
BIOS 499 - INDEPENDENT STUDY
BIOS 499 - INDEPENDENT STUDY:
BIOS 503 - MICROBIOLOGY
BIOS 611 - MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY/DIVERSITY
BIOS 699 - INDEPENDENT STUDY:
BIOS 711 - THESIS
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