RANGER RESTART: Updates, resources, and FAQs

International Studies

UW-PARKSIDE 2019-21 CATALOG
Greenquist 210 • 262-595-2334

College:
Social Sciences and Professional Studies

Degree and Programs Offered:
Bachelor of Arts
Major - International Studies
Minor - International Studies
Certificate - Global Skills

Student Activities
The International Studies program offers a reflective and critical approach to understanding international issues and global processes. We provide students with enriching learning experiences that range from student-centered teaching, study abroad, internships and other high impact practices such as capstone projects, service learning, e-portfolios, collaborative projects.

Career Possibilities
The International Studies program provides an excellent preparation for students interested in a wide variety of careers, including professional positions in private businesses, government agencies, higher education, non-governmental organizations, foundations, or any institution that operates nationally or in a global context.

Steering Committee
The Steering Committee serves as the executive decision-making body for the Center for International Studies, which offers all academic programs under International Studies.  Chaired  by the director, the steering committee includes faculty from all colleges and is currently composed of: Simon Akindes (Director, Politics, Philosophy and Law), Elizabeth Brownson (History), Seif Dana (Sociology), Kathleen Gillogly (Anthropology, Geography), Xun Wang (Sociology), Zhemin Wang (Business), Sahar Bahmani (Economics), and Elaine Isaacson Philippa (International Student Services).

Program Overview

International Studies combines courses from various departments to create a broad and interdisciplinary program, with a flexible curriculum that emphasizes the knowledge, analytical and critical skills, dispositions and cultural competencies needed to understand and navigate our contemporary global system. The program offers a major and a minor in international studies, and a global skills certificate. Students can work within the options available, or work with their advisor to develop a path of study that suits their own particular interests or career goals.

We recommend that students pursue a double major, which is entirely feasible without adding to costs and time. Consultation with all advisors is vital to embark on that path. 

Study Abroad

The International Studies program recognizes that studying abroad, working abroad or doing an internship abroad are excellent complements to the major, minor, or certificate programs. They can be rewarding and life-changing experiences. Incorporating study abroad into a student's college experience enhances the value of any academic program. UW-Parkside faculty-led programs, UW-System study abroad programs, and affiliated study abroad programs, once approved, can count toward elective credits in the international studies major. Study abroad programs are coordinated and arranged by the International Student Services directed by Laine Philippa. They can be week-, semester-, or year-long programs.

Preparation for Graduate and Professional Programs

The international studies major provides excellent preparation for individuals interested in international careers, law, business, foreign service, non-profit organizations, advocacy groups, foundations and many more. It also prepares students for working abroad, and for graduate studies in fields such as international relations, development studies, area/regional studies, public policy, international education, journalism or intercultural communication, and many other fields of study and practice.

Internships and Research Fellowships

The program arranges for internships and service learning opportunities in both domestic and international contexts. Summer research fellowships are available through the program on a competitive basis. The center has also developed internships to prepare students for professional careers in international education through administrative experience in study abroad and international student services.

Program Level Outcomes

Learning Goals:

  1. Students will be able to understand the world beyond their borders through interdisciplinary frameworks. (KNOWLEDGE)
  2. Students will be able to understand how interconnected the world is. (KNOWLEDGE)
  3. Students will be able to demonstrate the necessary skills to navigate cultural and national differences in diverse ways (SKILLS)
  4. Students will be able cultivate the dispositions to create a meaningful life of solidarity in relation to others’ worldview. (ATTITUDES)
     

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the major, International Studies students will be able to:

  1. Identify major global issues and concepts, comparing and contrasting differences and similarities among regions/countries (Learning Goal I).
    Components
    Students are able to:
    • articulate processes;
    • identify global trends in various areas;
    • analyze global systems;
    • discern economic, cultural, historical, and political similarities and differences.
  2. Collect and use data to effectively understand and interpret international issues, analyzing them using concepts and methods from different disciplines (Goals II, III)
    Components
    Students are able to collect data and information from:
    • International agencies;
    • Governments;
    • Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOS);
    • Primary sources;
    • Academic sources.
  3. Communicate effectively in writing and verbally regarding global and international issues, with critical intercultural perspectives (Goal II)
    Components
    Students are able to:
    • Write all forms of text (papers, reports, press releases, etc.);
    • Make effective presentations (including digital ones).
  4. Engage in multiple international and intercultural activities and experiences, appreciate cultural differences, tolerate national ambiguity, and reflect on how their national and cultural identities have been shaped. (Goal III)

Requirements for the International Studies Major (42 credits)

Students majoring in International Studies must complete a total of 42 credits of which 12 credits are introductory or pre-requisite courses. For core and electives courses, please note that every semester, the list is updated, posted or our website and sent to majors. You may request one from the Center for International Studies.

  1. Introductory/Foundation Courses (12 credits)
    Introductory courses are required of all majors and provide students with the introductory background knowledge for the wide range of disciplinary perspectives that comprise the International Studies program. In some cases, these courses are required for upper-level work in a discipline that is related to International Studies. Many of these courses also fulfill university general education requirements.
     
    1. Required Course (3 credits)
      INTS 100 Introduction to International Studies 3 cr
    2. Elective Courses (9 credits)
      Choose one course from three different groups:

      Many, but not all, of these courses fulfill general education requirements. Consult with your advisor to make sure that you take the appropriate range of general education courses needed. Keep in mind the prerequisites for upper-level courses you anticipate taking in the future.

      Group I
      ECON 120 Principles of Microeconomics 3 cr
      ECON 121 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 cr
      POLS 103 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 cr
      POLS 104 Introduction to International Relations 3 cr

      Group II
      GEOG 105 Contemporary Human Geography 3 cr
      GEOG 110 Introduction to Geography: World Regions 3 cr
      GEOS/
      INTS 109
      Fundamentals of Global Climate Change 3 cr

      Group III
      HIST 118 Western Civilization I: From Antiquity to 1300 3 cr
      HIST 126 World History I: From Antiquity to 1300 3 cr
      HIST 128 World History III: From 1800 to the Present 3 cr

      Group IV
      LBST 101 Introduction to the Humanities - World Cultures to 1500 3 cr
      LBST 102 Introduction to Humanities - World Cultures 1500-Present 3 cr

      Group V
      ANTH 100 Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr
      HIST/
      INTS 103
      Introduction to Asia 3 cr
      SOCA 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr
  2. Core Courses (15 credits)
    Core courses provide the broad comparative and global perspective and theoretical background essential to an international studies major.
    1. Group One: Methods Course (3-4 credits)
      When choosing a methods course, be sure to consider the prerequisites for that course. This requirement must be completed prior to taking INTS 495. Note: If taking sociology methods, you must take both SOCA 295 and 300 to meet the requirement.

      Choose one course:
      CRMJ 200 Criminal Justice Research Methods 3 cr
      ENGL 266 Literary Analysis 3 cr
      GEOG 300 Geographic Methods 3 cr
      HIST 250 Sources and Methods in History 3 cr
      POLS 200 Research Methods and Sources 4 cr
      PSYC 300 Research Methods in Psychology 3 cr
      QM 210 Business Statistics I 3 cr
      SOCA 250 Statistics for the Social Sciences 4 cr
      SOCA 300 Topics in Data Collection and Analysis 3 cr
      SOCA 303 Program Evaluation 3 cr
      SOCA 307 Survey Methods 3 cr
    2. Group Two: Core Elective Courses (11-12 credits)
      Take a maximum of two courses from any one department.

      Note: the conditional options below ENGL 346 OR ENGL 347; and SOCA 379 OR ANTH 382.
      ANTH/
      INTS 210
      Cultural Anthropology 3 cr
      ANTH/
      INTS 228
      Peoples of Southeast Asia 3 cr
      ANTH 312 Anthropology of Language 3 cr
      ANTH 357 Economic Anthropology 3 cr
      ANTH 362 Migration & Immigration 3 cr
      SOCA 329 Social Institutions in Contemporary China 3 cr
           
      SOCA 382 Environmental Anthropology 3 cr
      OR    
      SOCA 379 Society and Environment 3 cr
           
      COMM 365 Intercultural Communication 3 cr
      COMM 430 Digital & Social Media 3 cr
      COMM 460 Global Media 3 cr
      ECON 308 Economic Development 3 cr
      ECON 402 International Economics 3 cr
      ENGL 112 Women in Literature 3 cr
      ENGL 319 Modern/Contemporary British Literature 3 cr
           
      ENGL 346 Pre-1800 World Literature 3 cr
      OR    
      ENGL/
      MODL 347
      Post-1800 World Literature 3 cr
           
      ENGL 358 Film Genres 3 cr
      ENVS 101 Introduction to Environmental Studies 3 cr
      FIN 336 Management of Financial Institutions 3 cr
      FIN 437 International Financial Management 3 cr
      GEOG 108 Culture and Environmental Sustainability 3 cr
      HIST 260/460 International Conflict 3 cr
      HIST 290/490 Special Topics in History
      (with topics in Classical World to AD300 or East Asia: Ancient to Modern)
      3 cr
      HIST 328 History of Britain II: 1603 to Present 3 cr
      HIST 315 History of the Modern Middle East 3 cr
      HIST 318 History of Islam 3 cr
      HIST 319 Arab-Israeli Conflict 3 cr
      INTS 303 Global Skills Practicum: Political and Economic Systems 3 cr
      INTS 304 Global Skills Practicum: Culture and Language 3 cr
      LBST 102 Introduction to Humanities - World Cultures 1500-Present 3 cr
      MGT 446 Global Management 3 cr
      MKT 356 Global Marketing 3 cr
      MODL 191 Culture of Food: The French Case From Croissants to Champagne 3 cr
      MUSI 332 World of Music 3 cr
      POLS 330 European Politics 3 cr
      POLS 331 The Politics of Developing Nations 3 cr
      POLS 335 Popular Music, Human Rights and Democratization 3 cr
      POLS 340 The Latin American Left 3 cr
      POLS 344 African Politics 3 cr
      SMGT 330 Marketing for a Sustainable World 3 cr
      SOCA 354 Class, Status, and Power 3 cr
      SOCA 379 Society and Environment 3 cr
      SPAN 322 Spanish Literature Since 1700 3 cr
      SPAN 335 Spanish-American Literature Since 1700 3 cr
  3. Major Elective Course Options (12 credits)
    Elective options allow students to focus on an area of interest within the broad scope of International Studies. A list of currently approved courses for each option is available from your advisor, the Center for International Studies office and the department website. That list may include some of the core elective courses listed above. Students may also propose an individually designed option, subject to approval of the Center for International Studies Steering Committee.

    Students are required to complete a minimum of 12 credits in one of the following options. Course taken for these options must be taken from at least two different departments and must be selected in consultation with an international studies major advisor.

    Option A - Globalization and Development
    Focuses on the processes of political, economic and cultural changes that accompany globalization and development, with an emphasis on developing nations.

    Option B - International Relations
    Focuses on the major interactions among nations, including politics, trade and intercultural communication. Also includes consideration of international organizations and non-governmental organizations.

    Option C - Comparative Cultures and Societies
    Focuses on cross-cultural and comparative study of societies and cultures, including the arts, language, literature, politics and social organization.

    Option D – International Commerce/Business
    Focuses on commercial and economic relations among nations, from business and economic perspectives.

    Senior Seminar (3 Credits):
    INTS 495 Senior Seminar in International Studies 3 cr

    Senior Seminar is required of all majors in International Studies, except for those doing a double major who should take it in the other discipline. This capstone course is offered in Spring. Students should take it in their senior year or the Spring before intended graduation (if in December). Students are expected to carry out an original research paper or a professional practical project that caps their studies, especially in the elective option they have selected. The research methods course must be completed prior to taking the Senior Seminar so that students are appropriately equipped to carry out the research required for their senior project. Please, consult with your advisor regarding an appropriate research methods course for your particular option or research project interest soon after declaring your major.

    If you are seeking a double major, you must have consulted with your advisor in the other discipline about doing your Senior Seminar focusing on an international issue or project. Their consent is important to double majoring.
     

Recommended for the International Studies Major

Study abroad or any other experiential learning activity in International Studies is strongly recommended.

Each student planning to major in International Studies must consult regularly with an International Studies faculty advisor to schedule a coherent program consonant with their interests. This is particularly important when selecting elective course options. Students are cautioned to match prerequisite classes with higher level classes within the major.

Languages

Although, International Studies does not have a language requirement, faculty members strongly encourage students to gain additional language competence beyond the introductory level required for graduation. This is critical for students who choose elective course option C (Comparative Cultures and Societies).

Experiential Learning Activities

All majors in International Studies are strongly encouraged to take part in experiential learning in International Studies. This may be accomplished through study abroad, participation in short-term faculty-led study tours, semester or year-long study abroad, working with international students on campus, especially the Parkside International Club, or working/ volunteering with an international agency or a non-governmental organization in the international arena.

 

Requirements for the International Studies Minor (18 credits)

The international studies minor consists of 18 credits. The following courses are required:

  1. Required Course (3 credits)
    INTS 100 Introduction to International Studies 3 cr
  2. Core Courses (6 credits)
    Choose six credits from two different departments from the list below.
    ANTH 200/
    INTS 210
    Cultural Anthropology 3 cr
         
    ANTH 382 Environmental Anthropology 3 cr
    OR    
    SOCA 379 Society and Environment 3 cr
         
    COMM 365 Intercultural Communication 3 cr
    COMM 460 Global Media 3 cr
    ECON 308 Economic Development 3 cr
    ECON 402 International Economics 3 cr
    ENGL 319 Modern and Contemporary British Literature 3 cr
         
    ENGL 346 Pre-1800 World Literature 3 cr
    OR    
    ENGL/
    MODL 347  
    Post-1800 World Literature 3 cr
         
    ENGL 358 Film Genres 3 cr
    FIN 336 Management of Financial Institutions 3 cr
    FIN 437 International Financial Management 3 cr
    MGT 446 Global Management 3 cr
    MKT 356 Global Marketing 3 cr
    MUSI 332 World of Music 3 cr
    POLS 330 European Politics 3 cr
    POLS 331 The Politics of Developing Nations 3 cr
    POLS 335 Popular Music, Human Rights and Democratization 3 cr
    SMGT 330 Marketing for a Sustainable World 3 cr
  3. Elective Course (9 credits)
    Choose three 3-credit courses, in consultation with an International Studies advisor, that meet the requirements from one of the option areas listed below. A list of current approved courses for each of these options is available from your minor advisor, the Center for International Studies office and the department website.

    Option A - Globalization and Development
    Focus on the processes of political, economic, and sociocultural change that accompany globalization and development, with an emphasis on developing nations.

    Option B - International Relations
    Focus on the major interactions among nations, including politics, trade and intercultural communication. Also includes consideration of international organizations and non- governmental organizations.

    Option C - Comparative Cultures and Societies
    Focus on cross-cultural and comparative study of societies and cultures, including the arts, literature, politics and social organization.

    Option D - International Commerce
    Focus on commercial and economic relations among nations, including a business perspective as well as national economic policy.

 

Requirements for the Global Skills Certificate (13 credits)

The certificate in global skills is designed to assist students to understand and appreciate the impact of international affairs on their daily lives. Degree and non-degree students completing the certificate will be expected to value different cultures and political/economic systems, as well as become familiar with the numerous international connections that exist between countries through trade, diplomacy, international organizations and communication technology. Students are strongly encouraged to keep in mind that both core and options classes may have prerequisites.

  1. Required Courses (7 credits)
    INTS 100 Introduction to International Studies 3 cr
    INTS 301 Global Skills Practicum: Basic Global Skills 1 cr
    INTS 302 Global Skills Practicum: Perspectives on Globalization 1 cr
    INTS 303 Global Skills Practicum: Political and Economic Systems 1 cr
    INTS 304 Global Skills Practicum: Culture and Language 1 cr
  2. Core Course (3 credits)
    Choose one:
    ANTH/
    INTS 210 
    Cultural Anthropology 3 cr
    ANTH/
    INTS 228
    Peoples of Southeast Asia 3 cr
    ANTH 312 Anthropology of Language 3 cr
    ANTH 357 Livelihoods, Exchange, and Globalization 3 cr
    ANTH 362 Migration and Immigration 3 cr
    ANTH 382 Environmental Anthropology 3 cr
    COMM 365 Intercultural Communication 3 cr
    COMM 460 Global Media 3 cr
    ECON 308 Economic Development 3 cr
    ECON 402 International Economics 3 cr
         
    ENGL 346 Pre-1800 World Literature 3 cr
    OR    
    ENGL 347 Post-1800 World Literature 3 cr
         
    ENGL 358 Film Genres 3 cr
    FIN 437 International Financial Management 3 cr
    GEOG 108 Culture and Environmental Sustainability 3 cr
    MGT 446 Global Management 3 cr
    MKT 356 Global Marketing 3 cr
    MUSI 332 World of Music 3 cr
    POLS 330 European Politics 3 cr
    POLS 331 The Politics of Developing Nations 3 cr
    POLS 335 Popular Music, Human Rights and Democratization 3 cr
    SMGT 330 Marketing for a Sustainable World 3 cr
    SOCA 379 Society and Environment 3 cr
  3. Elective Course Option (3 credits)
    Choose one course in consultation with an International Studies advisor that meets the requirements for one of the options below. A list of currently approved courses for each option is available from your advisor, the Center for International Studies office and the department website.

    Option A - Globalization and Development
    Focus on the processes of political, economic and socio-cultural change that accompany globalization and development, with an emphasis on developing nations.

    Option B - International Relations
    Focus on the major interactions among nations, including politics, trade and intercultural communication. Also includes consideration of international organizations and non-governmental organizations.

    Option C - Comparative Cultures and Societies
    Focus on cross-cultural and comparative study of societies and cultures, including the arts, language, literature, politics and social organization.

    Option D – International Commerce
    Focus on commercial and economic relations among nations, including a business perspective as well as national economic policy.

Courses in International Studies (INTS)

100

Introduction to International Studies
Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
The course is intended as a broad introduction to the increasing international impact at the state, community and individual levels. Its objectives include developing practical orientations toward the international experience, such as language and cultural appreciation, social and political tolerance, and environmental adaptation.

3 cr
103

Introduction to Asia
Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Covers the social, cultural, economic, religious, literary, and political aspects of life in all regions of Asia, including China, India, Japan, Southeast Asia, and their neighboring countries. Cross-listed with HIST 103.

3 cr
109

Fundamentals of Global Climate Change
Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Surveys the current state of climate science including Earth’s energy budget, the atmosphere, the greenhouse effect, ocean circulation, climate feedbacks, climate modeling and Earth’s past climate. Also considers uncertainty in projections of future climate and solutions involving carbon sequestration, carbon-trade markets and energy efficiency. Three hour lecture. Cross-listed with GEOS 109.

3 cr
110

American Language and Culture
Prereq: Required of entering international students; consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Cultural and communication patterns in American society, for international students who speak English as a second language.

3 cr
205

Orientation to Study Abroad
Prereq: None. Freq: Occasionally.
Provides an introduction to various challenges (academic, social, cultural, linguistic, political and economic) related to studying in a foreign country. Students are familiarized with theories associated with culture shock, intercultural sensitivity, and communication and reverse culture shock and learn to apply these to their own up-coming international experience.

1 cr
206

Study Abroad Journaling
Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Primarily taught through guided written assignments while studying abroad; demonstrate an understanding of various stages and theories associated with culture shock by applying them to their living and studying abroad experiences in their host country.

2 cr
207

Cross-Cultural Reentry from Study Abroad
Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Designed for students returning from study abroad; reviews the concept of reentry shock, examines the process of reentry, and provides strategies for integrating the study abroad experiences with academics, professional goals and personal development.

1 cr
210

Cultural Anthropology
Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Introduces cross-cultural analysis of social structures and cultural systems, as well as changes due to economic, political, and cultural globalization. Cross-listed with ANTH 200.

3 cr
226

Peoples of Africa
Prereq: ANTH 100, SOCA 101, or INTS 100. Freq: Fall.
Surveys the societies and cultures of Africa. Discusses history, cultural variation, and contemporary social change. Cross-listed with SOCA 226.

3 cr
228

Peoples of Southeast Asia
Prereq: SOCA 100, 101, or INTS 100 or consent of instructor. Freq: Spring.
An anthropological survey of Southeast Asia, including the mainland and islands; focuses on cultures, history, socioeconomic conditionals, particularly the everyday life of people. Cross-listed with ANTH 228.

3 cr
268

Introduction to Holocaust Studies
Prereq: English 101 with grade of C- or better or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines historical, philosophical and other issues surrounding the Holocaust, using texts by those who experienced the Holocaust. Cross-listed with ENGL 268/HIST 268.

3 cr
290

Special Topics in International Studies
Prereq: Consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Subject matter is topical. Subject varies; see current course schedule.

1-3 cr
300

International Study Tours
Prereq: Consent of instructor. Freq: Fall.
Enables students to prepare for and participate in Study Abroad tours in international destinations. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.

1-6 cr
301

Global Skills Practicum: Basic Global Skills
Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Introduces essential knowledge and cultural sensitivity needed when traveling, working or communicating on the international level. Topics include cross-cultural comparisons and political issues. Students design solutions to global challenges and link academic work to an applied setting through additional project work.

1 cr
302

Global Skills Practicum: Perspectives on Globalization
Prereq: None. Freq:Yearly.
Examines various perspectives on contemporary globalization. Topics include internationalization and globalization in business, transnational communities and diaspora, changing global identities, and the shifting loci of power. Students design solutions to global challenges and link academic work to an applied setting through additional project work.

1 cr
303

Global Skills Practicum: Political and Economic Systems
Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Exposes students to the global context, the increased internationalization of economic relations, and its political ramifications.   Topics include foreign investment/trade, economic development, and democratic development. Students design solutions to global challenges and link academic work to an applied setting through additional project work.

1 cr
304

Global Skills Practicum: Culture and Language
Prereq: None. Freq: Yearly.
Introduces students to the diversity in cultures across the world. Topics include differences in language, food, psychology, religions, family relationships and bodily expressions. Students design solutions to global challenges and link academic work to an applied setting through additional project work.

1 cr
334

Resistance
Prereq: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Examines the concept and genealogy of modernity as understood by Foucault and Adorno, extends the Foucauldian understanding of Power and Resistance within modern and post-modern contexts by examining the works of Deleuze, Hardt and Negri, and others. Cross-listed with POLS 334.

3 cr
390

Special Topics
Prereq: Consent of instructor.  Freq: Occasionally.
Selected topics in international studies are examined. Subject varies; see current course schedule.

1-3 cr
400

Non-UW-Parkside Study Abroad
Prereq: Enrollment in approved semester study abroad program. Freq: Fall, Spring.
This course allows students to retain their good standing at UW-Parkside while they participate in non-UW-Parkside academic study abroad programs.

0 cr
401

Exchange Agreement Study Abroad
Prereq: Enrollment in approved exchange agreement program. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Provides a placeholder allowing students to retain their good standing at UW-Parkside while participating in an approved exchange agreement study abroad program. Graded credit/no credit.

0 cr
405

Internship in International Education Services
Prereq: Junior standing, major/minor in international studies, consent of instructor and program director. Freq: Spring.
The internship provides an opportunity for students to apply their international education knowledge in an experiential learning environment to gain experience in the professional world in two areas of international education: international student services and study abroad. Intended for students seeking an international experience in higher education or in other international education organizations.

1-3 cr
490

Special Topics
Prereq: Consent of instructor. Freq: Occasionally.
Selected topics in international studies are examined. Subject varies; see current course schedule.

1-3 cr
494

Internship in International Studies
Prereq: Junior or senior standing and consent of program director. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Enables a student’s paid or unpaid employment in an international context to count towards their academic program, and gives them an opportunity to reflect on the connection between their academic learning and the workplace. Does not provide credit specifically toward the INTS major, but does count for credit toward overall degree programs.

1-3 cr
495

Senior Seminar in International Studies
Prereq: Completion of major or minor requirements or consent of instructor and program director; a research methods course.  Freq: Yearly.
The senior seminar is the capstone course in the major and is required of all majors and minors. Students are expected to integrate the material studied in the major, and especially in their selected option. Students carry out an independent research project leading to a formal research paper and presentation.

3 cr
499

Independent Study
Prereq: Consent of instructor and program director. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Available to qualified students under supervision of instructor. Topic must be mutually agreed upon between professor and student.

1-4 cr

 
Graduate Courses

600

Study Abroad Placeholder
Prereq: Enrollment in approved study abroad program. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Provides a placeholder allowing students to retain their course standing at UW-Parkside while participating in an approved study abroad program. Graded credit/no credit.

0 cr
601

International Exchange Placeholder
Prereq: Enrollment in approved exchange agreement program. Freq: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Provides a placeholder allowing students to retain their course standing at UW-Parkside while participating in an approved student exchange study abroad program. Graded credit/no credit.

0 cr
Scroll to top