Liberal Studies

UW-PARKSIDE 2019-21 CATALOG
RITA/CART 235/221 • 262-595-2139/2609

College:
Arts and Humanities

Degree and Programs Offered:
Bachelor of Arts
Associate of Arts (see the Associate Degree Section)
Major - Liberal Studies
Major - Liberal Studies Online Degree Completion
Certificate – Leadership
Major Concentrations - Humanities; Social Sciences Studies; Organizational Studies; Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Career Possibilities:
There are many possible careers for liberal studies graduates, depending on how students plan their coursework. Graduates of the program may enroll in graduate programs, including business and law school, while others may find employment in a diverse range of occupations, including teaching, finance, and the legal field.

Program Overview


MISSION
Our mission is to provide flexible, innovative degree programs to students whose needs and interests are not limited to a single discipline. Grounded in the liberal arts tradition, we prepare graduates to:

  • Communicate effectively
  • Think critically and creatively
  • Make connections across disciplines
  • Become knowledgeable, engaged citizens of our local and global communities
  • Assume leadership roles and apply their knowledge in all areas of their professional and personal lives

The liberal studies major is a suitable degree-completion option for transfer and returning students, including working adults interested in career advancement.

VISION
We believe that students educated in the liberal arts tradition will have the skills to meet the many challenges of today’s workplace. Moreover, students who have the flexibility to choose advanced classes in multiple disciplines can design a major that better addresses their individual career goals. Liberal studies is committed to helping students create their own paths to degree completion, career success, and ultimately a more fulfilling quality of life. We envision our program, students, and graduates helping to shape a community that is intellectually engaged, globally connected, environmentally responsible, diverse, and inclusive.

Program Competency Areas

The flexible liberal studies curriculum is guided by six areas in which students are expected to demonstrate competency. These areas should guide students’ course selection as well as their focus within particular courses. Understanding of the competencies is demonstrated by the successful completion of a senior seminar project.  The competency areas are as follows:

Communication:
Effective communication skills include listening, speaking, reading, writing, and information literacy.

Ethical Reasoning and Action:
Individual, social, and environmental responsibility includes civic knowledge and engagement (both global and local).

History:
Recognizing patterns in past events and seeing their relevance to present-day life; demonstrating how contemporary social issues are rooted in past events and political choices; understanding the impacts of the social and physical environments on individual experience; and speculating in informed ways about how present-day trends might affect the future.

Critical and Creative Thinking:
The capacity to combine or synthesize existing ideas and information; comprehensively explore issues, ideas, objects, and events before reaching a conclusion.

Intercultural Knowledge:
Understanding and empathizing with people from diverse cultures; understanding societies and cultures on their own terms; interacting and working with people from diverse backgrounds; and leading or contributing support to those who lead.

Interdisciplinary Perspective:
The ability to make deliberate connections among various academic disciplines, to comprehend and participate in more than one discipline; the ability to reflect on the nature and value of an interdisciplinary perspective.

Preparation for Graduate School

Completion of a liberal studies degree is ideal preparation for graduate programs in the traditional liberal arts disciplines and other post-baccalaureate professional programs, such as law school.

Requirements for the Liberal Studies Major (36-47 credits)

Students complete the major “core” in addition to a concentration.

  1. Core Courses (9 credits)
    1. Required Courses (6 credits)
      LBST 103  Diversity in the United States 3 cr
      LBST 300 Humanistic Studies 3 cr
    2. Required Senior Seminar Capstone (3 credits)
      Capstone is to be completed final semester in the major/concentration.
      LBST 498 Senior Seminar Project 3 cr
      Note: In order to reach the 120 credits, including the 36 upper division credits, minimally required to earn a Bachelor’s degree at UW-Parkside, Liberal Studies majors may need to complete additional coursework in the form of “electives”. Alternatively, students may wish to augment their major with a minor or a certificate from any department on campus as a way to fulfill the remainder of their university requirements.
       
  2. Concentration Courses (27-38 credits)
    Students choose from four concentrations within the liberal studies major: humanities; social sciences studies; organizational studies; and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies.
     
    1. Requirements for the Humanities Concentration (27 credits)
      1. Foundational Courses (3 credits)

        At this stage, students work in many different disciplines to (1) explore areas of intellectual inquiry; (2) work on the basics of writing/communicating; (3) read widely and think critically; (4) sharpen study skills; (5) begin viewing the world from multiple, global perspectives; (6) lay the foundation of basic knowledge necessary for more advanced work in individual disciplines. Students are fulfilling general education requirements, which should complement the introduction to humanities and encourage connections between classes and fields of knowledge.

        Choose one course:

        LBST 101 Introduction to Humanities: World Cultures to 1500 3 cr
        LBST 102 Introduction to Humanities: World Cultures 1500 to Present 3 cr
        Note: In addition to the HUMA survey courses, students need to select other general education classes at the 100-level, taking care to meet prerequisites for 200-level skills/methods courses (listed in the section below) that are offered by individual disciplines. For example, a student wishing to take HIST 250 needs to have taken an additional HIST at the 100-level; 200-level PSYC classes require PSYC 101 completion.
         
      2. Communication Skills or Methods Courses (9 credits)
        At this stage, students will move beyond the basics, gaining skills and knowledge necessary to perform well in more specialized classes for majors in two or more disciplines. Some of these courses are “gateway” classes, i.e. they are prerequisites for courses at the 300- 400 level. Students should choose classes carefully, with an eye toward the topics and fields they want to explore in greater depth as they map out their advanced, 300-400-level course work.

        Choose three courses (from at least two different departments):
        COMM 207 Introduction to Communication Discipline, Part I 3 cr
        COMM 208 Introduction to Communication Discipline, Part II 3 cr
        COMM 303 Organizational Communication 3 cr
        COMM 315 Communication and Gender 3 cr
        COMM 350 Digital Storytelling 3 cr
        ENGL 201 Advanced Composition 3 cr
        ENGL 202 Technical Writing 3 cr
        ENGL 204 Writing for Business and Industry 3 cr
        ENGL 206 Creative Writing-Poetry 3 cr
        ENGL 207 Creative Writing-Fiction 3 cr
        ENGL 266 Literary Analysis 3 cr
        ENGL 458 Studies in Film 3 cr
        HIST 250 Sources and Methods in History 3 cr
        LBST 100 Introduction to the Disciplines 3 cr
        LBST 252 Introduction to Film 3 cr
        ISTD 200 Introduction to Leadership 3 cr

        OR

        Any 200- or 300-level language, art, music, theater, or philosophy course that is. Other 200/300-level, non-general education classes (for example, in the social and behavior sciences) may be used to fulfill this requirement, subject to approval of the director and steering committee, in consultation with the student and adviser.
         

      3. Humanities Concentration Courses (15 credits)
        A combination of 300-400 level courses, selected in consultation with adviser, totaling 15 credits.  At this level, students should consider not only how classes help achieve competency goals, but how course choices enhance future career plans. Consider courses that will help the student bring unique skills, knowledge, perspectives, and experience into their personal lives and professions. Students are encouraged to review UW-Parkside’s various minors and certificate programs to see if their selected “Major Concentration” could also satisfy most or all requirements for a minor or certificate when combined with completed 100- and 200-level coursework.
         
    2. Requirements for the Social Science Studies Concentration (37-38 credits)
      The distinguishing feature of this second concentration option is the independently designed theme.   Working with the liberal studies adviser, students design a course of study built around a particular theme or problem in the social and behavioral sciences. Students will be accepted as liberal studies majors and allowed to proceed with an independently designed theme after that program of study has been designed in consultation with the program adviser.
      1. Introductory Social Science Courses (9 credits)
        Choose three courses (from at least two different departments):
        ANTH 100 Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr
        ANTH 200 Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr
        ANTH 201 Introduction to Archaeology 3 cr
        COMM 107 Communication and the Human Condition 3 cr
        COMM 108 Media and Society 3 cr
        ECON 101 The American Economy 3 cr
        ECON 120 Principles of Microeconomics 3 cr
        ECON 121 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 cr
        GEOG 100 Physical Geography and the Environment 3 cr
        GEOG 105 Contemporary Human Geography 3 cr
        GEOG 110 Introduction to Geography - World Regions 3 cr
        HIST 102 The United States, Reconstruction to Recent Times 3 cr
        HIST 120 Western Civilization III: From 1815 to the Present 3 cr
        POLS 100 American Politics 3 cr
        POLS 104 Introduction to International Relations 3 cr
        POLS 105 Introduction to Politics 3 cr
        PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychological Science 3 cr
        SOCA 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr
        WGSS 110 Introduction to Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies 3 cr
      2. Methodology Course (3-4 credits)
        Choose one course:
        HIST 250 Sources and Methods in History 3 cr
        POLS 200 Research Methods and Sources 4 cr
        PSYC 300 Research Methods in Psychology 3 cr
             
        SOCA 250 Statistics for the Social Sciences 3 cr
        OR    
        QM 210 Business Statistics I 3 cr
      3. Scope of Coverage (9 credits)
        Choose one 3-credit course from three of the following disciplines: anthropology, communication, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, solciology, women’s gender and sexuality studies, or ethnic studies. The purpose of the scope of coverage requirements is to ensure the interdisciplinarity nature of the student’s program.
         
      4. Major Theme (15 credits)
        A combination of 200-400 level courses within the social sciences related to a central theme or issue totaling 15 credits. Students should consider not only how classes address the theme, but how course choices may enhance future career and/or interpersonal goals. Students are also encouraged to review UW-Parkside’s various minors and certificate programs to see if their selected “Major Theme” can also satisfy most or all requirements for a minor or certificate when combined with completed 100-level coursework. Examples of advisor approved themes chosen by previous students are as follows:
        • The American Worker in Adaptation to Change
        • Poverty and Social Welfare
        • Crime and Psychological Problems Among Children
        • Illiteracy in America
        • Ethnicity and Political/Social Patterns in the U.S.
        • Politics and Mass Communication
        • Healthcare
        • Environment Policy

          The 15 credits of the themes must meet the following requirements:
        • At least 9 credits must be at the 300/400 level.
        • No more than 6 credits can be earned by directed or independent study.
        • Introductory and methods courses cannot count toward the 15 credits in the theme.
           
    3. Requirements for the Organizational Studies Concentration (27-28 credits)
      The organizational studies concentration is designed to help students understand the structures, operations, and functions of complex organizations in both public and private sector settings. Faculty members from a number of academic disciplines, including sociology/anthropology, economics, psychology, geography, history, political science, communication, philosophy, and business, provide students with a multidimensional, multi-perspective, comprehensive understanding of complex organizations in our society.
       
      1. Foundational Behavior and Organizational Courses (9 credits)
        Choose three:
        COMM 303 Organizational Communication 3 cr
        LBST 210 Introduction to Leadership 3 cr
        PSYC 101

        Introduction to Psychological Science

        3 cr
        SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr
      2. Statistics Course (3-4 credits)
        Choose one:
        POLS 200 Research Methods and Sources 4 cr
        PSYC 250 Psychological Statistics 3 cr
        QM 210 Business Statistics I 3 cr
        SOCA 250 Statistics for the Social Sciences 4 cr
        Consult with instructor regarding prerequisites.
         
      3. Concentration Courses (18 credits)
        Choose 18 credits with no more than 9 credits from one area as listed below or from the UW-Parkside catalog with consultation with your adviser. Students should consider courses that will help bring specific skills, knowledge, perspectives, and experience into their personal lives and careers. Students are also encouraged to review UW-Parkside’s various certificate programs to see if their selected “Concentration Courses” could also satisfy most or all requirements for a certificate when combined with completed 100- and 200-level coursework.

        History/Political Science/Geography
        GEOG 360 Urban Geography 3 cr
        ETHN/SOCA 206 Race and Ethnic Relations in the US 3 cr
        ETHN/HIST 302 Race/Ethnicity: United States of America 1890 to the Present 3 cr
        POLS 100 American Politics 3 cr
        POLS 202 Public Policy 3 cr
        Economics/Business
        ECON 120 Principles of Microeconomics 3 cr
        ECON 380 The Labor Market 3 cr
        HRM 343 Human Resource Management 3 cr
        MGT 349 Organizational Behavior 3 cr
        MGT 447 Management Techniques 3 cr
        PMGT 341 Basics of Project Management 3 cr
        PMGT 342 Essential Personal Skills for Project Management 3 cr
        Liberal Studies
        LBST 168 Student Leadership 3 cr
        LBST 210 Introduction to Leadership 3 cr
        Sociology/Psychology
        PSYC 320 Sociological Social Psychology 3 cr
        SOCA 301 Sociological Theory 3 cr
        SOCA 306 Research in Community Needs 3 cr
        SOCA 320 Sociological Social Psychology 3 cr
        SOCA 326 Social Gerontology 3 cr
        SOCA 373 Formal Organization 3 cr
        Communication
        COMM 107 Communication and the Human Condition 3 cr
        COMM 285 Introduction to Conflict Analysis and Resolution 3 cr
        COMM 303 Organizational Communication 3 cr
        COMM 365 Intercultural Communication 3 cr
        COMM 385 Conflict Mediation 3 cr
        ENGL 204 Writing for Business and Industry 3 cr
    4. Requirements for the Liberal Studies with Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Concentration (27 credits)
      1. Introductory Courses (6 credits)
        WGSS 110 Introduction to Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 3 cr
        One course in Feminist Theories 3 cr
        (Appropriate classes offered in English, history, philosophy, communication, psychology, etc., with approval of program director.)
         
      2. Concentration Courses (9 credits)
        Choose from at least one from the following three areas:

        Humanities and Art
        COMM 315 Communication and Gender 3 cr
        COMM 463  Gender, Race, Class, and Sexualities in Media 3 cr
        ENGL 417 Studies in British Literature: British Women Novelists Topic 3 cr
        ENGL 469 Women as Writers and Characters 3 cr
        PHIL 290 Special Topics in Philosophy: Feminism in Philosophy Topic 3 cr
        THEA/ WGSS 215 LGBTQ Representation on Stage and Screen 3 cr
        WGSS 112 Women in Literature 3 cr
        Social Sciences
        CRMJ 366 Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice 3 cr
        HIST 236 Women in Modern Society 3 cr
        MGT 446 Global Management 3 cr
        POLS 203 Women, Power, and Politics 3 cr
        PSYC 280/380 Psychology of Gender 3 cr
        SOCA 213 Gender and Society 3 cr
        Natural Sciences
        BIOS 103 Human Biology 3 cr
        HESM 285 Sport in Society 3 cr
        HESM 321 Women’s Health Issues 3 cr
        SOCA 379 Society and Environment 3 cr
        WGSS 250 Women in Science 3 cr
      3. Elective Courses related to concentration; one must be at the 400-level (12 credits)
        Select approved courses with adviser.

 

Admission Requirements for the Liberal Studies Online Major

A streamlined version of our traditional program, the major in liberal studies with a concentration in organizational studies as an online degree completion program offers students who have limitations in their schedules and transportation, an accessible, flexible program to complete their bachelor’s degree. This program is ideal for students returning to college after a hiatus, and adults whose family and work lives make online learning the most practical pathway for completing their bachelor’s degree. Before being admitted, students must meet the following requirements and apply specifically for the degree completion version of Liberal Studies with Organizational Studies Concentration Online (LBSO).

Requirements for being admitted into LBSO:

  • A minimum of 60 college credits
  • Completion of the UW-Parkside Skills requirements
  • Completion of the UW-Parkside Foreign Language requirements
  • Completion of the UW-Parkside General Education requirements (Students who have fewer than five General Education courses left to take may be considered for admission); or, completion of an associate degree from an accredited, college-parallel program.
  • Each student application will be evaluated by admissions counselors and Liberal Studies advisors. Students who have not completed some of these requirements may be given conditional admission and are expected to complete all requirements needed for a UW-Parkside degree.
     

Requirements for the Liberal Studies Online Major (36-37 credits)

Students complete the major “core” in addition the organizational studies concentration.

  1. Core Courses (9 credits)
    1. Required Courses (6 credits)
      LBST 103 Diversity in the United States 3 cr
      LBST 300 Humanistic Studies 3 cr
      Note: LBST 300 will also fulfill the university’s diversity requirement.
       
    2. Required Senior Seminar Capstone (3 credits)
      Capstone is to be completed final semester in the major/concentration.
      LBST 498 Senior Seminar Project 3 cr
      Note: In order to reach the 120 credits, including the 36 upper division credits, minimally required to earn a Bachelor’s degree at UW-Parkside, Liberal Studies majors may need to complete additional coursework in the form of “electives”. Alternatively, students may wish to augment their major with a minor or a certificate from any department on campus as a way to fulfill the remainder of their university requirements.
       
  2. Liberal Studies Concentration Courses (30-31 credits)
    1. Foundational Behavior and Organizational Courses (9 credits)
      COMM 303 Organizational Communication 3 cr
      PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychological Science 3 cr
      SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr
    2. Statistics Course (3-4 credits)
      Choose one:
      PSYC 250 Psychological Statistics 3 cr
      QM 210 Business Statistics I 3 cr
      SOCA 250 Statistics for the Social Sciences 4 cr
    3. Concentration Courses (18 credits)
      1. Required Elective Course (3 credits)
        Choose one course:
        PSYC 220 Social Psychology 3 cr
        SOCA 320 Sociological Social Psychology 3 cr
      2. Required Courses (15 credits)
        SOCA 301 Sociological Theory 3 cr
        COMM 107 Communication and Human Condition 3 cr
        POLS 100 American Politics 3 cr
        ETHN/SOCA 206 Race and Ethnic Relations in the U.S. 3 cr
        ENGL 204 Writing for Business and Industry 3 cr
    4. Elective Courses (24 credits minimum)
      If students enrolled in this program have the minimum of 60 credits, and complete the above 36 credits, they will still need an additional 24 credits to meet the minimum required 120 credits to complete their UW-Parkside degree. Below are examples or recommended groupings of elective courses for focused degree completion. Students are also required to meet the 36 upper-division credits required to graduate and are expected to meet that minimum requirement through incoming credits or elective credits.
       
      1. Business Organization Electives (18 credits minimum)
        ACCT 201 Financial Accounting 3 cr
        BUS 100 Introduction to Business 3 cr
        BUS 272 Legal Environment of Business 3 cr
        ECON 120 Principles of Microeconomics 3 cr
        ECON 121 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 cr
        ECON 367 Financial Institutions and Markets 3 cr
        PMGT 341 Basics of Project Management 3 cr
        PMGT 342 Essential Personal Skills for Project Management 3 cr
      2. Public Sector Organization Electives (18 credits minimum)
        BUS 272 Legal Environment of Business 3 cr
        ECON 101 The American Economy 3 cr
        HIST 102 The United States: Reconstruction To Recent Times 3 cr
        HIST 128 World History III: From 1800 to The Present 3 cr
        PHIL 205 Philosophy of Religion 3 cr
        GEOG 100 Physical Geography and the Environment 3 cr
        SOCA 354 Class, Status and Power 3 cr
        SOCA 355 Urbanism and Urbanization 3 cr
        Other groups of elective courses can be requested through the department

        Students can complete credits via elective courses offered through UW-Parkside. Students will be advised to select elective courses based on their interests, career goals, and transfer credits as they become available and as they are relevant to this degree-completion program. Students are also required to meet the 36 upper-division credits required to graduate and are expected to meet that minimum requirement through incoming credits or elective credits.

 

Requirements for the Leadership Certificate (12 credits)

The leadership certificate provides a curriculum that combines conceptual and theoretical frameworks with opportunities to apply those concepts and theories in real-world situations. Students who complete the certificate program will have an enhanced understanding of the personal qualities, interpersonal dynamics, and social patterns that influence leadership efforts. They will also have the opportunity to hone specific leadership skills such as self-assessment and public speaking; identify and assess resources; work in diverse settings; and evaluate and reflect on students’ own leadership styles. Pursuing the leadership certificate is also an excellent opportunity for civic engagement.

  1. Required Courses (6 credits)
    LBST 210 Introduction to Leadership 3 cr
    LBST 492 Practicum in Leadership 3 cr
  2. Elective Courses (6 credits)
    Choose two courses:
    COMM 285 Introduction to Conflict Analysis and Resolution 3 cr
    COMM 303 Organizational Communication 3 cr
    HRM 343 Human Resource Management 3 cr
    MGT 447 Management Techniques 3 cr
    SOCA 306 Research in Community Needs 3 cr

 

Courses in Liberal Studies (LBST)

100

Introduction to the Disciplines: Humanities and the Arts
Prereq: Freshman or sophomore standing only.  Freq: Occasionally.
Explores the nature, history, overarching questions and notable figures in the Humanities and the Arts such as: art, communication, English, ethnic studies, liberal studies, modern languages, music, theatre, public speaking and women’s, gender and sexuality studies. Topics include an explanation of the UW-P General Education Program and may include information about academic success issues.

3 cr
101

Introduction to Humanities: World Cultures to 1500
Prereq: None. Freq: Fall.
Offers a thematic and comparative approach to the history of world cultures, prehistoric to 1500. Focuses on the West, but including significant material from a variety of non-Western cultures.

3 cr
102

Introduction to Humanities: World Cultures 1500 to Present
Prereq: None. Freq: Spring.
Offers thematic and comparative approach to the history of world cultures from 1500 to present. Focuses on the West, but including significant material from a variety of non-Western cultures.

3 cr
103

Diversity in the United States
Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Offers thematic and comparative approach to the history and culture of the United States, focusing on one or more of the diverse groups that comprise that culture.

3 cr
108

Prior Learning Assessment Portfolio Development
Prereq:  Consent of program director.  Freq:  Fall, Spring, Summer.
Provides guidance for portfolio development to obtain credit for prior learning. Students will gain an overview of adult learning and distance education.  Students learn to select, categorize, evaluate, and document achievements and accomplishments for review and assessment related to educational goals, academic placement, and the awarding of college credit. Offered through the Council for Adult and Experiential Leaning (CAEL) or by the department.

3 cr
168

Student Leadership
Prereq:  Acceptance to office of admissions and new student services orientation program. Instructor consent. Freq:  Spring.
Provides practical opportunities to learn and grow in preparation of your employment with the office of admissions and new student services.

3 cr
210

Introduction to Leadership
Prereq: None. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Introduces principles of leadership from an interdisciplinary theoretical and practical perspective. Introduces skills such as self-assessment, communication strategies, understanding group dynamics and working in coalitions, setting goals while remaining flexible, and managing conflict.

3 cr
290

Special Topics in Liberal Studies
Prereq:  Consent of instructor.  Freq: Occasionally.
Special topics in liberal studies will be examined.  May be repeated for credit with different topic.

1-3 cr
300

Humanistic Studies
Prereq: LBST 103 or the consent of instructor.  Freq: Fall, Spring
Investigates philosophies, methods, and issues within the humanities. Provides foundational understandings of the marginalizations that have occurred in this country since its (European) establishment.

3 cr
367

Latinos and the Law
Prereq: CRMJ 101 or POLS 100 or the consent of instructor.  Freq: Occasionally.
Introduces and examines experiences Latinos(as) encounter with and within the U.S. criminal justice system, as well as related international and transnational issues. Uses a range of theoretical frameworks, including socio-ecological, political, and psychological. Cross-listed with CRMJ 367/POLS 367.

3 cr
390

Special Topics in Liberal Studies
Prereq:  Consent of instructor.  Freq:  Occasionally.
Special topics in liberal studies will be examined.  May be repeated for credit with different topic.

1-3 cr
490

Special Topics in Liberal Studies
Prereq: Junior standing or consent of instructor.  Freq: Occasionally.
Examines special topics in liberal studies. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

1-3 cr
492

Practicum in Leadership
Prereq: ISTD 200 and two other leadership courses; or consent of instructor. Freq: Spring.
Supports students as they complete the capstone project for the leadership certificate.

3 cr
494

Internship in Liberal Studies
Prereq: Liberal studies major, junior standing, and consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring
Directed field experience, focusing on application of scholarly concepts to the workplace. Specific arrangements to be made in consultation with adviser.  Maximum of 4 credits may be applied to the major.

1-4 cr
498

Senior Seminar Project
Prereq:  Liberal studies major, senior standing, and consent of instructor. Freq: Fall, Spring.
Enables students to apply the knowledge and competencies of Liberal Studies to a senior project.

3 cr
499

Independent Study
Prereq:  Liberal studies major, junior standing, and consent of instructor. Freq:  Fall, Spring, Summer.
Individual study of selected topics in Liberal Studies.

1-3 cr
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