RANGER RECOVERY: Updated mask / face covering requirements

Smart Cities U

VIRTUAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

 

OVERVIEW

Taught by faculty and industry-recognized experts, the Smart Cities U noncredit certificate is designed to meet the needs of anyone looking to benefit their community, particularly on-the-ground practitioners in small to midsize communities with fewer than 500,000 residents.

Enjoy the convenience of learning from anywhere. You will learn about smart city development planning, including the importance of collaboration amongst stakeholders, through case studies, activities, and additional resources. These sessions are helpful for non-government and government organizations, including individuals looking to do business with governmental organizations.

AVAILABLE FOCUS AREAS

Smart Cities U is constructed with specialized certificates in different smart cities topics, allowing participants the ability to partake in their area of greatest need. Each topic has three separate workshops focusing on the following components: assessment, government capacity, and action planning. Participants have to partake in all three workshops of that specialty topic to receive the certificate and shareable digital badge.

Smart Mobility

Smart Infrastructure

Smart Security

LAUNCH SESSIONS

Overview of Smart Cities and how it links to Economic Development

Instructors: Peggy James and William Martin

Economic development is a number one concern for municipalities, as a means to increase the well being of their citizens and successful economic development depends on collaborative planning, funding, and implementation. This session will identify trends in economic development in small to midsize communities, suggest timelines for development, and tie in smart city tactics to the overall strategic plan. Selected Smart city approaches, technology based and non- technology based, will be presented and discussed.

First steps in planning for Smart Cities

Instructor: Joe Mariani

Three goals:- quality of life, economic competitiveness, and sustainability—can provide the foundation for a smart city initiative. Deloitte’s smart city framework offers a lens through which technology can seed change in six urban domains: economy, mobility, security, education, living, and environment. Practical first steps to begin smart city development will be discussed, along with ways to analyze the initiative’s "investment readiness" and its access to finance. The plan should will include a robust business model; a creative approach to funding and financing sources (finding new sources of revenue for projects and new business models for recovery and value capture); and innovative financing structures for investors.

SMART MOBILITY

Smart Mobility: Baseline analysis of need, equity gaps, economic/social opportunities

Using GIS (Geographical Information Systems), baseline datasets can be created for planning purposes. Baseline analysis will include data collection resources, data preparation, data modeling, and result presentation. GIS is one of the tools through which governments can integrate multiple characteristics of their community in a spatial context, determining the scope and intensity of need. Clear presentation of results which is imperative to any consensual decision making process will be described and samples provided. Selected mobility related variables will be discussed such as multi modal mobility patterns ( including pedestrian), stress points or gaps in the mobility framework, and the integration of demographic characteristics and the impact on the planning process.

Smart Mobility: Utilizing readiness tools to analyze your community and municipality

This session builds on the first session in this track which provided skills for baseline assessment in the transportation area. In this workshop, we will share selected readiness tools that can be used to assess political, economic, and social resources to launch a smart mobility initiative.

Smart Mobility: Successful readiness assessment and project launch

Instructors: Phil Wagner or Marty Gottschalk

In this session, we will do a deeper dive into a successful readiness assessment and project launch in a small to midsize municipality. The City of Racine, as part of Smart Racine efforts, is pioneering the introduction and integration of an autonomous vehicle (AV) shuttle into public transportation systems in Wisconsin. The Racine AV shuttle, known as the “Badger”, represents the first municipal AV deployment in Wisconsin and heralds the future of transportation: automated, connected, electrified and shared. As such, Racine AV provides a unique opportunity for the citizens and businesses of Racine and throughout Wisconsin to personally experience AV transportation, explore the positive impact of its implementation, and envision the many benefits that follow along. This session will explore the readiness assessments for the project, and the potential for technology transfer of an AV into smaller, regional communities.

SMART INFRASTRUCTURE

Smart Infrastructure: Baseline analysis of need, equity gaps, economic/social opportunities

Instructor: Kenny French

Using GIS (Geographical Information Systems), baseline datasets can be created for planning purposes. Baseline analysis will include data collection resources, data preparation, data modeling, and result presentation. GIS is one of the tools through which governments can integrate multiple characteristics of their community in a spatial context, determining the scope and intensity of need. Clear presentation of results is imperative to any consensual decision making process. Selected infrastructure related objects will be discussed such as roadways, health facilities, schools, and housing, and the integration of demographic characteristics.

Smart Infrastructure: Utilizing readiness tools to analyze your community and municipality

This session builds on the first which provided skills for baseline assessment in the infrastructure area. In this workshop, we will share selected readiness tools that can be used to assess political, economic, and social resources to launch a smart infrastructure initiative. Three types of infrastructure readiness will be assessed:- the physical attributes of the community that provide the opportunities for economic development, the organizational characteristics of the government and associated stakeholders to implement any needed change, and the technological resources available to implement initiatives.

Smart Infrastructure: Successful readiness assessment and project launch

Instructor: Phil Hockberger

The Kenosha Innovation NeighbourhoodNeighborhood is an economic development project that utilizes smart city concepts. The former center of Kenosha's economy and community is a 107-acre urban tract used for 117 years for auto engine manufacturing. Closed in 2010 and demolished by 2013, redeveloping the site today is the focus of the Mayor's vision to add technology-based jobs and industries and attract and retain next-generation employees. Waymaker Group recommended early investments in healthcare technology and leveraged strategic relationships with Tier One universities and Fortune 500 companies to initiate phase one of development. Economic outcomes also include housing creation, support for commercial development, job creation and the establishment of a “neighborhood center” with services that support the neighborhood. An integrated infrastructure project requires the commitment of multiple stakeholders, and a readiness assessment that includes community participation.

SMART SECURITY

Smart Security: Baseline analysis of need, equity gaps, economic/social opportunities

Instructor: Kenny French

Using GIS (Geographical Information Systems), baseline datasets can be created for planning purposes. Baseline analysis will include data collection resources, data preparation, data modeling, and result presentation. GIS is one of the tools through which governments can integrate multiple characteristics of their community in a spatial context, determining the scope and intensity of need. Clear presentation of results is imperative to any consensual decision-making process. Selected security related variables will be discussed such as crime incidents, accidents, security monitoring systems, and the integration of demographic characteristics.

Smart Security: Utilizing readiness tools to analyze your community and municipality

Building on the baseline analysis this session will review various tools to assess select safety concerns, including criminal activity, pedestrian safety, and police training. Different communities will require different assessment tools according to their specific needs, and the community feedback. In this session, community as a stakeholder will be stressed, and issues of equity will be highlighted.

Smart Security: Successful readiness assessment and project launch

Racine County is one Wisconsin unit that is initiating projects to use Virtual Reality simulations in police trainings to assist officers in developing appropriate tactical responses to deescalate crisis situations. The Racine County program will be presented, along with an assessment as to why it was needed, its challenges and advantages for the police and the public. The degree of community input and the community response will be considered.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS

  • Joe Mariani

    Joe Mariani

    Joe Mariani is a Kenosha resident and research manager with Deloitte’s Center for Government Insights. His research focuses on innovation and technology adoption for both national security organizations and commercial businesses. His previous work includes experience as a consultant to the defense and intelligence industries, high school science teacher, and Marine Corps intelligence officer.

  • Headshot of Kenny French

    Dr. Kenny French

    Dr. Kenny French, Associate Professor of Geography and Geographic Information Systems at the University of Wisconsin Parkside, specializes in urban planning and transportation applications. Dr French teaches geography of transportation and land use planning.

  • Phil Hockberger, PhD

    Phil Hockberger, PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is a current faculty member at Northwestern University in Chicago. Recently he founded the Chicago Biomedical Innovation Alliance to foster communication and coordination among stakeholders interested in building innovation districts in Chicago. He was recently appointed to Mayor Lightfoot’s Healthcare and Life Sciences Working Group, charged with contributing to the 10-year economic development plan for the City of Chicago.

  • Headshot of Peggy James

    Dr. Peggy James

    Dr. Peggy James, Dean and Professor at the University of Wisconsin Parkside, has published on smart cities and civic technology. She currently teaches courses on strategic and tactical decision making. She has coauthored work with William Martin on the initial steps of Racine Wisconsin towards becoming a smart city.

  • William Martin

    William Martin, CEO of Badger Development , former CIO of Racine Wisconsin, was the lead member of Racine’s team when it received the Smart City Designation from the Smart Cities Council in 2019, the smallest city to receive that designation nationally.

REQUEST INFO

Requirements
Zoom

Prerequisites 
There are no prereqs but it is intended for all government officials, private corporations, non-profit organizations, investment/ development funds

The University of Wisconsin-Parkside is committed to providing access, equal opportunity, and reasonable accommodation in its services, program activities, education, and employment for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodations, contact Professional and Continuing Education at least eight weeks in advance at: 262-595-3340 (V), 262-595-2513 (FAX), or email continuing.ed@uwp.edu.
 

Scroll to top