RANGER RECOVERY: Updated mask / face covering requirements

Land Acknowledgement
We the Community of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside acknowledge with gratitude and humility the First Nations People of Wisconsin, whose original homelands lie within the state. We especially wish to recognize the Ho-Chunk, Miami, and Potawatomi Nations for their significant historical and spiritual connections with the Parkside area. Our footsteps do not replace theirs, but rest alongside them. Today, Wisconsin is home to 12 First Nations communities: the Ho-Chunk Nation, the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, the Menominee Nation, the Forest County Potawatomi Community, the Stockbridge-Munsee Band of the Mohicans, the Brothertown Indian Nation, and six Lake Superior Bands of the Ojibwe Nation: the Bad River, Lac Courte Oreilles, Lac du Flambeau, Mole Lake Sokaogan, Red Cliff, and Saint Croix bands. The University of Wisconsin-Parkside acknowledges and honors this history and these nations. 

Native American Heritage Month honors the culture, traditions, arts, and history of the Native American community. Join us this month as we learn from educators and celebrate the rich culture of the Native American community. Stay connected to us on Facebook and Instagram to know about upcoming events!

NAHM Ronnie Preston

Native American Heritage Month: Opening Ceremony 

NOV 1  |  11 AM-1 PM  |  Student Center, Ballroom

The Offices of Multicultural Student Affairs and Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion are excited to bring you an afternoon of traditional Native storytelling and dance to kick off Native American Heritage month!

Native American artist Ronnie Preston of the San Carlos Apache Nation will perform storytelling, dancing, and singing. Ronnie has been touring the country as a Native cultural educator for more than 15 years. His performance will teach Indigenous history and break harmful stereotypes through art.

 
 
Photo Credit: John Koster

NAHM Ronnie Preston

Ronnie Preston
 

Ronnie Preston of the San Carlos Apache tribal nation is a teacher and activist.  Born in Milwaukee, Ronnie has been traveling the country for more than 15 years singing, dancing, but most importantly, educating others about Indigenous people and preserving accurate Indigenous history nationwide. Mr. Preston considers himself a teacher because he shares stories that are real and not hiding behind fairytales.  After being fed up with frequently being approached by people with a myopic and inaccurate views of what it means to be Indigenous, he knew it was necessary for him to get out and reach as many people as possible because the truth had to be told.  Ronnie is passionate about truth telling of indigenous history and dispelling harmful stereotypes. The educational shows are vibrant and lively and thrive on the energy from the crowd. Audience members are given the opportunity to engage and become a part of the performance because they are invited to join him on stage. Ronnie skillfully highlights the connection between earth and humans, humans to one another, and humanizes a group of people that have been historically misrepresented in the media. Through his commitment and dedication, Mr. Preston has made a huge impact on the people in his community and across the United States.

Sasso_Bob

Dr. Bob Sasso
 

Robert F. (“Bob”) Sasso is Associate Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Geography and Anthropology, and Coordinator of the Museum Studies Certificate Program at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside in Kenosha, where he teaches courses in Archaeology, Physical Anthropology, Native North American Cultures, and general Anthropology. A native of Wilmette, Illinois, Bob has been researching the archaeology of Wisconsin and the Upper Midwest for over forty years. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Master of Arts and Doctoral degree in Anthropology from Northwestern University. Since 1990, his research largely has focused the archaeology of the historic Potawatomi in southeastern Wisconsin and has gathered and recorded information on hundreds of their sites here and in northeastern Illinois. He has provided site data and historical and archaeological information to the Forest County Potawatomi. For ten years, he and Dan Joyce, Director of the Kenosha Public Museums, investigated the early nineteenth century fur trade post run by brothers Louis and Jacques Vieau, Jr. and the Skunk Grove Potawatomi village at what is now Franksville in Racine County. They have collaborated on the investigation of other early historic sites in southeastern Wisconsin, including Resique's Tavern on Simmons Island and most recently the Montgomery Cabin site in Petrifying Springs County Park.

We’re Still Here: A Social Media Campaign 

Throughout the month of November, the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs will repost videos of Native social media influencers. These young activists, honor the traditions of their heritage by posting educational and thought-provoking videos for others to learn from. Follow OMSA on Facebook and Instagram for video links that are part of the "We’re Still Here" series. 

Native American Heritage Month Library Collection

The Library, in collaboration with the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs (OMSA) is pleased to present a curated library display featuring works featuring Native voices for Native American Heritage Month. Items include fiction and non-fiction books, graphic novels, DVDs, and CDs. These items are available for checkout with a Ranger Card or photo ID. Suggestions for purchase are also welcome. 

Activism: Existence as Protest

NOV 10  |  12 PM  |  Student Center, Oak Room

Learn how to be an activist for the Native Community and other underrepresented communities. Dr. Heather Kind-Keppel will discuss how to engage as an activist through being.
 

Heather Kind-Keppel
 

Dr. Heather Kind-Keppel is the Executive Director of Diversity and Inclusion and Deputy Title IX Officer at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. In her role at RFUMS, Kind-Keppel is engaged in the development of training and education initiatives for students, faculty, and staff while supporting the Assistant Director of Inclusion Programs. Kind-Keppel also has a faculty appointment in the Chicago Medical School and is an Associate Instructor at UW-Parkside where she has taught courses in Ethnic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Political Science, and Communication. Kind-Keppel has always been passionate about actively advocating for, the creation of, and sustaining inclusive environments in higher education both in and outside of the classroom through her diversity, equity, and inclusion work. Her research and scholarship has focused on the experience of Natives in higher education and how institutions can more effectively create spaces that are Indigenous versus the continued use of education as a way to perpetuate assimilation. Kind-Keppel has also advocated throughout her career for the narratives of Natives to be infused into both curriculum and social justice initiatives. Kind-Keppel has a Doctorate in Education, Master of Science in Counseling, a Master of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, a Bachelor of Arts in History.  

MOSAIC Workshop: We’re Still Here

NOV 15  |  12 PM  |  Molinaro L111

Participate in the “We’re Still Here” workshop. MOSAIC Educators will lead a discussion on debunking the misconceptions of the Native American community.

Elisa Kurber

Elisa Kurber is a Junior studying Communication with a Minor in Organizational Communication. She chose to become a MOSAIC educator because it is something she feels helps her learn more about the people around her and helps her grow into a better version of herself by seeing life through a new lens. She learns more every single day and with this improved perspective on the world, she wants to use it to teach others about diversity and inclusion on campus so they can bring that knowledge with them outside of our workshops—there really is more to learn than people realize, and there’s always room to improve! 

 

Dimler_Tess

Tess Dimler is a Sophmore studying Psychology with a Minor in Sociology and Certificate in Business Fundamentals. She chose to become a MOSAIC Educator because she is passionate about building strong communities rooted in diversity, equity, and inclusion. She believes that If we want to see students thrive, they must feel accepted and supported by a healthy learning environment. She would love to help, as well as encourage, in making this a reality.

Kill the Indian, Save the Man: A Discussion on Boarding Schools

NOV 16  |  12:30 PM  |  Student Center, Cinema

For 150 years, Native American children were removed from their families and placed in boarding schools operated by the federal government and the churches. Children were tortured and killed, and many of their bodies are still being recovered today. Dr. Heather Kind-Keppel will lead a conversation on the history and impact of boarding schools in the United States and Canada.

Heather Kind-Keppel
 

Dr. Heather Kind-Keppel is the Executive Director of Diversity and Inclusion and Deputy Title IX Officer at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. In her role at RFUMS, Kind-Keppel is engaged in the development of training and education initiatives for students, faculty, and staff while supporting the Assistant Director of Inclusion Programs. Kind-Keppel also has a faculty appointment in the Chicago Medical School and is an Associate Instructor at UW-Parkside where she has taught courses in Ethnic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Political Science, and Communication. Kind-Keppel has always been passionate about actively advocating for, the creation of, and sustaining inclusive environments in higher education both in and outside of the classroom through her diversity, equity, and inclusion work. Her research and scholarship has focused on the experience of Natives in higher education and how institutions can more effectively create spaces that are Indigenous versus the continued use of education as a way to perpetuate assimilation. Kind-Keppel has also advocated throughout her career for the narratives of Natives to be infused into both curriculum and social justice initiatives. Kind-Keppel has a Doctorate in Education, Master of Science in Counseling, a Master of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, a Bachelor of Arts in History.  

Sacred Circle Meet and Greet: A Native Student Organization

NOV 30  |  12:30 PM  |  Molinaro L112

Interested in joining a Native Student Organization? Stop by the Sacred Circle Meet and Greet to learn more about the organization. We will cover the history of Sacred Circle and discuss opportunities for growth. Snacks will be provided.

NEED MORE INFO?

Office of Multicultural Student Affairs (OMSA)  |  262-595-2731  |  omsa@uwp.edu

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